List of Northumbrian saints

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from List of saints of Northumbria)
Jump to: navigation, search

This list of Northumbrian saints includes Christian saints with strong connections to the medieval Kingdom of Northumbria, either because they were of local origin and ethnicity (chiefly Anglian) or because they travelled to Northumbria from their own homeland and became noted in their hagiography for work there. Northumbria existed from the 7th–10th centuries in what is now northern England, along with areas of the Scottish Borders and the Lothian. Its chief ecclesiastical centre was York.

During the reign of king Oswald of Northumbria, an Irish monk Aidan was invited to reconvert the area to Christianity. He and other Irish monks achieved this and subsequently the Northumbrians helped to reconvert much of the rest of England and also parts of the European Continent.

Saints[edit]

Saint Aidan
Saint Cuthbert
Saint Willibrord
Saint Benedict Biscop
Saint John of Beverley
Name Born Life Comments Feast Reference
Edwin of Northumbria Deira, Northumbria 586—632 King of Northumbria, converted to Christianity from paganism. 12 October [1]
Paulinus of York Rome died 644 First bishop of the refounded diocese of York
Converted Edwin to Christianity.
10 October [2]
Oswald of Northumbria Deira, Northumbria 604—642 King of Northumbria, invited Aidan to reconvert his kingdom to Christianity. 5 August [3]
Aidan of Lindisfarne Connacht, Ireland died 651 First Bishop of Lindisfarne, invited by Oswald to reconvert Northumbria. 31 August [4]
Oswine of Deira Deira, Northumbria died 651 King of Deira, died "at least for the justice of Christ". 20 August [5]
Honorius of Canterbury Rome died 653 accompanied Paulinus, wrote to Pope to raise York into archbishoporic. 30 September [6]
Everilda Wessex Founder of Everingham. Wessex princess, became a nun in Northumbria. 9 July [7]
Finan of Lindisfarne Ireland died 661 Bishop of Lindisfarne, converted Sigeberht II of Essex and Peada of Mercia. 9 February [8]
Colmán of Lindisfarne Ireland 605—675 Bishop of Lindisfarne, active during time of the Synod of Whitby. 8 August [9]
Balin Northumbria Brother of Gerald of Mayo, disciple of Colmán, moved to Connacht. 3 September [10]
Tuda of Lindisfarne Ireland died 664 Bishop of Lindisfarne, staunch supporter of Latin calculations of Easter. 21 October [11]
Boisil Northumbria died 664 Founder of Melrose, abbot who was the teacher of Cuthbert. 7 July [12]
Hilda of Whitby Deira, Northumbria 614—680 Founder of Whitby, abbess and part of the Deiran royal family. 17 November [13]
Æbbe the Elder Northumbria 615—683 Founder of Ebchester and St Abb's Head, abbess and Bernician princess. 25 August [14]
Eata of Hexham Northumbria died 686 Bishop of Lindisfarne, earlier abbot, first non-Irishman to hold the bishopric. 26 October [15]
Cedd Northumbria 620—664 Bishop of London, brother of Chad, credited with reconversion of Essex. 26 October [16]
James the Deacon Rome accompanied Paulinus, taught people Gregorian chant and plain song. 11 October [17]
Chad of Mercia Northumbria died 672 Bishop of York, brother of Cedd, credited with Christianisation of Mercia. 2 March [18]
Cædmon Whitby, Northumbria Earliest English poet, herdsman who became a devoted monk [19]
Hereswitha Deira, Northumbria sister of Hilda of Whitby, retired to Gaul to lead religious life. 3 September [20]
Begu Hackness, Northumbria died 690 Nun at Whitby, witnessed miracle of Hilda. 31 October [21]
The Two Ewalds Northumbria died 695 missionaries Ewald the Black and Ewald the Fair, martyred in Old Saxony. 3 October [22]
Eanflæd of Bernicia Deira, Northumbria 626—704 Queen of Bernicia, later Abbess of Whitby succeeding Hilda. 24 November [23]
Benedict Biscop Northumbria 628—690 Founder of Monkwearmouth and Jarrow, Benedictine abbot. 12 January [24]
Bosa of York Northumbria died 705 Bishop of York, educated as a scholar at Whitby Abbey under Hilda. 9 March [25]
Hædde Headingley, Northumbria died 705 Bishop of Winchester, was also a monk at Whitby Abbey. 7 July [26]
Wilfrid Northumbria 633—709 Founder of Ripon and Preston, Bishop of York, advocate of Latin Easter. 24 April [27]
Cuthbert of Lindisfarne Dunbar, Northumbria 634—687 Bishop of Lindisfarne, priest and hermit, patron saint of Northumbria 20 March [28]
Ceolfrith Northumbria 642—716 Abbot of Wearmouth, major contributor to the project Codex Amiatinus. 25 September [29]
Easterwine Northumbria 650—686 Abbot of Wearmouth, previously a soldier in earlier life. 7 March [30]
Eadberht of Lindisfarne Northumbria died 698 Bishop of Lindisfarne, favoured poverty, long periods of solitude and devotion. 6 May [31]
Ælfflæd of Whitby Deira, Northumbria 654—713 Daughter of king Oswiu of Northumbria and Eanflæd, Abbess of Whitby. 8 February [32]
Willibrord Northumbria 658—739 Founder of Utrecht, missionary known as Apostle of the Frisians. 7 November [33]
Acca of Hexham Northumbria 660—740 Bishop of Hexham, strong promoter of education. 20 October [34]
Suitbert of Kaiserwerdt Northumbria died 713 Founder of Kaiserswerth, joined Willibrord's Frisian mission. 1 March [35]
Egbert of Northumbria Northumbria died 729 monk at the Abbey of Rathmelsigi, arranged Willibrord's Frisian mission. 24 April [36]
Adalbert of Egmond Northumbria monk at the Abbey of Rathmelsigi, joined Willibrord's Frisian mission. 25 June [37]
John of Beverley Harpham, Northumbria died 721 Founder of Beverley, Bishop of Hexham and then Bishop of York. 7 May [38]
Eadfrith of Lindisfarne Northumbria died 721 Bishop of Lindisfarne, said to have been artist of the Lindisfarne Gospels. 4 June
Bede Jarrow, Northumbria 672—735 author of History of the English People, recognised Doctor of the Church. 25 May [39]
Æthelwold of Lindisfarne Northumbria died 740 Bishop of Lindisfarne, oversaw binding of the raw Lindisfarne Gospels. 12 February [40]
Wilfrid II Whitby, Northumbria died 745 Bishop of York, described as a very holy man, and interested in education. 29 April [41]
Osana Deira, Northumbria 698—750 sister of Osred I of Northumbria, known for miraculous grave flagellation. 18 June [42]
Baldred of Tyninghame Ireland died 757 Hermit and priest, moved to Lindisfarne, known as Apostle of the Lothians. 6 March [43]
Billfrith Northumbria died 758 Benedictine hermit, silversmith who bound the Lindisfarne Gospels. 6 March [44]
Æthelwold of Farne Northumbria Hermit who lived on Inner Farne, priest and a monk at Ripon Abbey. 23 March [45]
Lebuinus Ripon, Northumbria died 773 Founder of Deventer, an Apostle of the Frisians. 12 November [46]
Alcmund of Hexham Northumbria died 781 Bishop of Hexham. Considered a saint after death. 7 September [47]
Ælfwald I of Northumbria Northumbria died 788 King of Northumbria. Considered a saint at Hexham Abbey after murder.
Willehad of Bremen Northumbria 735—789 First Bishop of Bremen, missionary to the Saxons under Charlemagne. 13 July [48]
Alkelda Northumbria died 800 princess and nun, strangled by Viking women during raid at Middleham. 28 March [49]
Alcmund of Derby Northumbria died 800 Northumbrian prince, son of king Alhred of Northumbria. 19 March [50]
Bega Ireland princess from Ireland, valued virginity, moved to Northumbria to avoid pirates. 7 November [51]
Æbbe of Coldingham Northumbria died 870 Founder of Coldingham, origin of cutting off the nose to spite the face. 25 August

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "St. Edwin". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  2. ^ "St. Paulinus, Archbishop of York". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  3. ^ "St. Oswald". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  4. ^ "St. Aidan of Lindisfarne". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  5. ^ "St. Oswin". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  6. ^ "St. Honorius". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  7. ^ "St. Everilda of Everingham". Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of America.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  8. ^ "St. Finan". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  9. ^ "St. Colman". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  10. ^ "St. Balin". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 8 November 2009.
  11. ^ "St. Tuda". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  12. ^ "St. Boisil". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  13. ^ "St. Hilda". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  14. ^ "St. Aebbe the Elder". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  15. ^ "St. Eata". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  16. ^ "St. Cedd". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  17. ^ "St. James the Deacon". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  18. ^ "St. Ceadda". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  19. ^ "St. Caedmon". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  20. ^ "St. Hereswitha". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  21. ^ "St. Begu". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  22. ^ "Ss. Ewald the Dark and Ewald the Fair". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  23. ^ "St. Eanfleda". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  24. ^ "St. Benedict Biscop". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  25. ^ "St. Bosa". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  26. ^ "St. Haedda of Winchester". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  27. ^ "St. Wilfrid". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  28. ^ "St. Cuthbert". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  29. ^ "St. Ceolfrith". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  30. ^ "St. Easterwine". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  31. ^ "St. Eadbert". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  32. ^ "Ælfflæd". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  33. ^ "St. Willibrord". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  34. ^ "St. Acca". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  35. ^ "St. Suitbert". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  36. ^ "St. Egbert". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  37. ^ "Adalbert of Egmond". Oxford Dictionary of Saints. [dead link] Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  38. ^ "St. John of Beverley". Oxford Dictionary of Saints.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  39. ^ "The Venerable Bede". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  40. ^ "St. Ethelwald". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  41. ^ "St. Wilfrid the Younger". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  42. ^ "St. Osana". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  43. ^ "St. Baldred". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  44. ^ "St. Bilfrid". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 13 November 2009.
  45. ^ "Saint Ethelwald of Farne". Saints.SQPN.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  46. ^ "St. Lebwin". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  47. ^ "St. Alcmund". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  48. ^ "St. Willehad". Catholic Encyclopedia.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  49. ^ "St. Alkelda". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  50. ^ "British Saints". Britannia.com.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.
  51. ^ "St. Bega". Catholic Online.  Retrieved on 28 October 2009.