List of sausages

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Chorizo sausage

This is a list of notable sausages. Sausage is a food usually made from ground meat with a skin around it. Typically, a sausage is formed in a casing traditionally made from intestine, but sometimes synthetic. Some sausages are cooked during processing and the casing may be removed after. Sausage making is a traditional food preservation technique. Sausages may be preserved by curing, drying, or smoking.

Sausages[edit]

A British-style breakfast with black pudding (far left)
Sai ua is a grilled pork sausage from Northern Thailand and Northeastern Burma.
Winter salami is a type of Hungarian salami[1] based on a centuries-old producing tradition.

By country[edit]

Argentina[edit]

Armenia[edit]

Australia[edit]

Austria[edit]

Smoked Extrawurst

Belgium[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Bulgaria[edit]

Canada[edit]

Chile[edit]

China[edit]

Colombia[edit]

Croatia[edit]

Cuba[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Estonia[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Various boudin

Georgia[edit]

Germany[edit]

A variety of bratwurst on a stand at the Hauptmarkt in Nuremberg, Germany

Greece[edit]

Hungary[edit]

India[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Italy[edit]

Kaminwurz from South Tyrol
A variety of soppressata
Italian salumi[edit]
Aging salumi

Salumi are Italian cured meat products and predominantly made from pork. Only sausage versions of salumi are listed below. See the salumi article and Category:Salumi for additional varieties.

Kazakhstan[edit]

Korea[edit]

Laos[edit]

Lebanon[edit]

Lithuania[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Morocco[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Braadworst in an enamel pan

Philippines[edit]

Various types of Philippine longganisa in Quiapo, Manila

Poland[edit]

Polish kielbasa, grilled
  • kielbasa
  • kabanos, a thin, air-dried sausage flavoured with caraway seed, originally made of pork
  • kiełbasa wędzona, Polish smoked sausage
  • krakowska, a thick, straight sausage hot-smoked with pepper and garlic
  • wiejska ([ˈvʲejska]) - a large U-shaped pork and veal sausage with marjoram and garlic
  • weselna, "wedding" sausage, medium thick, u-shaped smoked sausage; often eaten during parties, but not exclusively
  • kaszanka or kiszka - traditional blood sausage or black pudding
  • myśliwska - smoked, dried pork sausage.
  • kiełbasa biała - a white sausage sold uncooked
  • prasky

Portugal[edit]

Puerto Rico[edit]

Morcilla cocida, Spanish-style blood sausage eaten in Spain and Latin America

Romania[edit]

Pleşcoi sausages served with bread and mustard

Russia[edit]

  • Doktorskaya kolbasa (lit. doctor's sausage) – predominant type of mortadella-type sausage closely resembling American-style, lard-less bologna; it was invented in USSR as a healthy food for people with stomach problems, and ended up dominating the Russian market for cooked sausages with high water content (so-called "boiled sausages" in Russia). According to the original Soviet state standard, it had to be made with pork, beef, eggs, milk, cardamom or nutmeg, salt and sugar.
  • Krestyanskaya kolbasa (peasant sausage)
  • Sardelka – a small cooked sausage that is eaten like a frankfurter; it is, however, thicker than a typical frankfurter.

Serbia[edit]

South Africa[edit]

Spain[edit]

Botifarra cooking on a grill

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

A St. Galler bratwurst, schüblig and cervelat, cooked and served hot.

Taiwan[edit]

Thailand[edit]

Tunisia[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Ukraine[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

English[edit]
Scottish[edit]
Welsh[edit]

United States[edit]

Packaged pepperoni slices

Venezuela[edit]

Vietnam[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Herz salami 1888
  2. ^ Lapidos, Juliet (8 June 2011). "Vegetarian Sausage: Which imitation pig-scrap-product is best?". Slate.
  3. ^ Hempstead, A. (2017). Moon Atlantic Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland & Labrador. Travel Guide. Avalon Publishing. p. pt171. ISBN 978-1-63121-486-8. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  4. ^ Toldrá, F. (2010). Handbook of Meat Processing. Wiley. p. 391. ISBN 978-0-8138-2096-5. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  5. ^ Steves, R. (2017). Rick Steves Berlin. Rick Steves. Avalon Publishing. p. pt606. ISBN 978-1-63121-694-7. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  6. ^ Sheraton, M. (2010). The German Cookbook: A Complete Guide to Mastering Authentic German Cooking. Random House Publishing Group. p. pt396. ISBN 978-0-307-75457-8. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  7. ^ Long, L.M. (2015). Ethnic American Food Today: A Cultural Encyclopedia. Ethnic American Food Today. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 277. ISBN 978-1-4422-2731-6. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  8. ^ Phillips, A.; Scotchmer, J. (2010). Hungary. Bradt Guides. Bradt Travel Guides. p. 373. ISBN 978-1-84162-285-9. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  9. ^ Publishing, DK (2012). Sausage (in German). DK Publishing. p. 34. ISBN 978-1-4654-0092-5. Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  10. ^ Südtirol - Das Kochbuch Gebundene Ausgabe. Köln: Naumann Und Goebel; (30 August 2011), p. 15, ISBN 978-3625130277
  11. ^ "Kaminwurzen – smoked dry sausages, pack of 3". Metzgerei Mair. Metzgerei Mair. Retrieved 18 September 2015.
  12. ^ Wadi, S. (2015). The New Mediterranean Table: Modern and Rustic Recipes Inspired by Traditions Spanning Three Continents. Page Street Publishing. p. 193. ISBN 978-1-62414-104-1. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  13. ^ Khalifé, M. (2008). The Mezze Cookbook. New Holland. p. 10. ISBN 978-1-84537-978-0. Retrieved 22 October 2017.
  14. ^ "Banat Sausage". Radio Romania International. 23 October 2017. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  15. ^ Handbook of Fermented Meat and Poultry. Wiley. 2014. p. 245. ISBN 978-1-118-52267-7. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  16. ^ Allen, G. (2015). Sausage: A Global History. Edible (in German). Reaktion Books. p. pt115. ISBN 978-1-78023-555-4. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  17. ^ Sinclair, C. (2009). Dictionary of Food: International Food and Cooking Terms from A to Z. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. pt1179. ISBN 978-1-4081-0218-3. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  18. ^ "Stornoway black pudding given protected status". BBC News. 8 May 2013. Retrieved 26 March 2014.
  19. ^ Country Life. Country Life, Limited. 2000. p. 53. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  20. ^ Sinclair, C. (2009). Dictionary of Food: International Food and Cooking Terms from A to Z. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. pt571. ISBN 978-1-4081-0218-3. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  21. ^ Webb, A. (2012). Food Britannia. Random House. pp. 120–121. ISBN 978-1-4090-2222-0. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  22. ^ "Britain's Best Baker judge urges menu simplicity". The Morning Advertiser. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  23. ^ Finney, T.B. (1908). Handy Guide: For the Use of Pork Butchers, Butchers, Bacon Curers, Sausage and Brawn Manufacturers, Provision Merchants, Etc. T.B. Finney. p. 67. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  24. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/6159630.stm,
  25. ^ Carr, David (16 January 2009). "A Monument to Munchies". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 May 2010.
  26. ^ Bruni, Frank (30 May 2007). "Go, Eat, You Never Know". Retrieved 26 July 2017.

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Sausages at Wikimedia Commons
  • Media related to Salumi at Wikimedia Commons
  • Media related to Sausage making at Wikimedia Commons