List of secondary highways in Nipissing District

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This is a list of secondary highways in Nipissing District, many of which serve as logging roads or provide access to Algonquin Park and sparsely populated areas in the Nipissing District of northeastern Ontario.

Highway 523[edit]

Highway 523 shield

Highway 523
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 20.1 km[1] (12.5 mi)
Major junctions
South end: NipissingHastings boundary
North end:  Highway 60 – Madawaska
Location
Districts: Nipissing
Highway system
Highway 522B Highway 524

Secondary Highway 523, commonly referred to as Highway 523, is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. The highway is a 20.1-kilometre (12.5 mi) north–south route in Nipissing District which follows the historic Madawaska Colonization Road. The highway begins at the Nipissing-Hastings boundary, where it continues south to Highway 127. It ends at Highway 60 in the village of Madawaska.

Highway 531[edit]

Highway 531 shield

Highway 531
Route information
Length: 13.5 km[1] (8.4 mi)
Existed: 1956[2] – present
Major junctions
South end: Maple Road in Bonfield
North end:  Highway 17 – Ottawa
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Villages: Bonfield
Highway system
Highway 529A Highway 532

Secondary Highway 531, commonly referred to as Highway 531, is a provincially maintained secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It connects Highway 17 east of North Bay with the community of Bonfield. The 3.5-kilometre (2.2 mi) route was established in 1956, and has remained the same since then. It passes through a forested area and has several private residences located along its length. Aside from Maple Road, its southern terminus, and Highway 17, its northern terminus, Highway 531 encounters no roads along its length.

Highway 533[edit]

Highway 533 shield

Highway 533
Route information
Length: 53.4 km[1] (33.2 mi)
Existed: 1956[2] – present
Major junctions
South end:  Highway 17 in Mattawa
North end:  Highway 63 near Eldee
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Towns: Mattawa
Highway system
Highway 532 Highway 534
Highway 533 through Mattawa

Secondary Highway 533, commonly referred to as Highway 533, is a provincially maintained secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. The route begins in the town of Mattawa, at Highway 17, and travels north to Highway 63.

Highway 539[edit]

Highway 539 shield

Highway 539
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 37.0 km[1] (23.0 mi)
Major junctions
Southwest end:  Highway 17 in Warren
  Highway 539A in River Valley
Northeast end:  Highway 64 in Field
Location
Divisions: Sudbury District, Nipissing District
Major cities: Markstay-Warren, West Nipissing
Highway system
Highway 538 Highway 540
Highway 539 north of Warren

Secondary Highway 539, commonly referred to as Highway 539, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, located within the Sudbury and Nipissing Districts. Commencing at a junction with Highway 17 in the community of Warren, the highway extends northeasterly for 23.4 kilometres (14.5 mi) to the community of River Valley, and thence southeasterly for 13.6 kilometres (8.5 mi) to a junction with Highway 64 in Field.

A spur route, Highway 539A, extends northwesterly from Highway 539 at River Valley.

Highway 539A[edit]

Highway 539A shield

Highway 539A
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 5.8 km[1] (3.6 mi)
Existed: 1958 – present
Major junctions
Southeast end:  Highway 539 in River Valley
Northwest end:  Highway 805 at the SudburyNipissing boundary
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Towns: West Nipissing, River Valley
Highway system
Highway 539 Highway 540
Highway 539A near River Valley

Secondary Highway 539A, commonly referred to as Highway 539A, is a provincially maintained secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, located within Nipissing District. Commencing at a junction with Highway 539 in the community of River Valley, the highway extends northwesterly for 13.1 kilometres (8.1 mi) to a point near where the Sturgeon River crosses the boundary between Nipissing and Sudbury District. At this point, the roadway turns northward and continues as Highway 805.

Highway 575[edit]

Highway 575 shield

Highway 575
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 19 km[1] (12 mi)
Major junctions
Northeast end:  Highway 17 in Verner
Northwest end:  Highway 64 in Field
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Towns: West Nipissing, Verner, Field
Highway system
Highway 575 near Field

Secondary Highway 575, commonly referred to as Highway 575, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, located within Nipissing District. Commencing at Highway 17 in Verner, the highway travels to Highway 64 in the community of Field, a distance of 19 km (12 mi).

Highway 630[edit]

Highway 630 shield

Highway 630
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 27.8 km[1] (17.3 mi)
Major junctions
South end: Kiosk
North end:  Highway 17 in Calvin
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Highway system
Highway 628 Highway 631

Secondary Highway 630, commonly referred to as Highway 630, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It provides access to Algonquin Provincial Park from the north. It measures 27.8 km in length and links Highway 17 with the community of Kiosk.

Highway 656[edit]

Highway 656 shield

Highway 656
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 3.8 km[1] (2.4 mi)
Major junctions
South end:  Highway 533 near Mattawa
North end: Otto Holden Generating Station
Location
Divisions: Nipissing District
Highway system
Highway 655 Highway 657

Secondary Highway 656, commonly referred to as Highway 656, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It provides access to the Otto Holden Generating Station on the Ottawa River from a junction with Highway 533 located just north of Mattawa.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2007). "Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts". Retrieved July 8, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Ontario Secondary Roads Now Designated 500, 600". 112 (33,119). The Globe and Mail. February 4, 1956. p. 4. Two new Ontario road numbers appear on the province's 1956 official road map which will be ready for distribution next week. The new numbers are the 500 and 600 series and designate hundreds of miles of secondary roads which are wholly maintained by the Highways Department. More than 100 secondary roads will have their own numbers and signs this year. All of these secondary roads were taken into the province's main highways system because they form important connecting links with the King's Highways