List of shipwrecks in 1918

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The list of shipwrecks in 1918 includes ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during 1918.

table of contents
← 1917 1918 1919 →
Jan Feb Mar Apr
May Jun Jul Aug
Sep Oct Nov Dec
Unknown date
References

January[edit]


February[edit]


March[edit]


April[edit]


May[edit]


June[edit]


July[edit]


August[edit]


September[edit]


October[edit]


November[edit]


December[edit]


Unknown date[edit]

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date 1918
Ship Country Description
Barge No. 739 and Barge No. 740  United States Army The barges sank off Black Point, Connecticut before 28 September.[1]
Fairhaven  United States
The hulk of Fairhaven, ca. 1920.
Fire destroyed the sternwheel passenger paddle steamer at her moorings in Seattle, Washington.
Diana  Germany The cargo ship was sunk off the coast of Norway following a boiler explosion in January or early February.[2]
Dorothy Barrett  United States The tugboat was wrecked by ice in January–February at Richardson's Landing. Her machinery was salvaged in the Spring.[3]
Elisha  United States The tugboat was wrecked by ice in January–February. Raised and repaired.[4]
Hazel Watson  United States The tugboat was wrecked by ice in January–February.[5]
Isabella  United States The icebreaker was wrecked by ice in January–February.[6]
Kaisei Maru  Japan Impounded in Sealing Cove (57°03′N 135°22′W / 57.050°N 135.367°W / 57.050; -135.367 (Sealing Cove)) on the coast of Japonski Island in Sitka, Territory of Alaska, since 1909 or 1910 for illegal seal hunting, the ship sank ca. 1918 after becoming waterlogged.[7]
Norian The vessel ran aground on the mattress sill at the head of Pass a Loutre, Louisiana in fog. Refloated 18 days later.[8]
Pastime  United States The wreck of the yacht was reported as an obstruction on 7 September in the Cheboygan River opposite the City Park, Cheboygan, Michigan and work to remove it was finished on 19 October.[9]
Sénégamble  France The ship collided with another vessel and sank in February or early March.[10]
Success  Australia The sailing vessel, a fake museum ship, supposedly of an earlier career as an Australian prison ship, was sunk by ice at Carrollton, Kentucky in January–February 1918, though some sources say 1917 or 1919.[11]
SM UB-107  Imperial German Navy World War I: The Type UB III submarine struck a mine and sank in the North Sea (54°08′N 0°00′E / 54.133°N 0.000°E / 54.133; 0.000) between 27 July and 3 August with the loss of all 38 crew.
SM UC-79  Imperial German Navy World War I: The Type UC II submarine struck a mine and sank in the English Channel off Cap Gris Nez, Pas-de-Calais, France in late March or early April.
Vulcan  United States Army The condemned and stripped US Army Corps of Engineers dipper dredge was disposed of by scuttling in the St. Louis, Missouri District.[12]
Wabash  United States The tugboat was wrecked by ice in January–February.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Records of the T. A. Scott co". mysticseaport.org. Retrieved 26 April 2021.
  2. ^ "Imperial and Foreign news items". The Times. No. 41704. London. 4 February 1918. col E, p. 5.
  3. ^ "American Marine Engineer June, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 19 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  4. ^ "American Marine Engineer October, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 28 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  5. ^ "American Marine Engineer March, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 4 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  6. ^ "American Marine Engineer March, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 4 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  7. ^ alaskashipwreck.com Alaska Shipwrecks (K)
  8. ^ "Annual report of the chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, Corp of Engineers Year ending June 30, 1919". Government Printing Office, Washington. 1919. Retrieved 14 August 2019 – via Googlebooks.
  9. ^ "Annual report of the chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, Corp of Engineers Year ending June 30, 1919". Government Printing Office, Washington. 1919. Retrieved 26 April 2021 – via Googlebooks.
  10. ^ "Shipping losses". The Times. No. 41729. London. 5 March 1918. col A, p. 3.
  11. ^ "American Marine Engineer March, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 4 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  12. ^ "Annual report of the chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, Corp of Engineers Year ending June 30, 1919". Government Printing Office, Washington. 1919. Retrieved 14 August 2019 – via Googlebooks.
  13. ^ "American Marine Engineer March, 1918". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 4 September 2020 – via Haithi Trust.

See also[edit]

Ship events in 1918
Ship launches: 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923
Ship commissionings: 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923
Ship decommissionings: 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923
Shipwrecks: 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923