List of shipwrecks in the Great Lakes

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The Great Lakes, a collection of five freshwater lakes located in North America, have been sailed upon since at least the 17th century, and thousands of ships have been sunk while traversing them. Many of these ships were never found, so the exact number of shipwrecks in the Lakes is unknown; the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum approximates 6,000 ships and 30,000 lives lost,[1] while historian and mariner Mark Thompson has estimated that the total number of wrecks is likely more than 25,000.[2] In the period between 1816, when the Invincible was lost, to the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald in 1975, the Whitefish Point area alone has claimed at least 240 ships.[2]

Map of the shipwrecks in the Great Storm of 1913
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Lake Erie[edit]

Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates
17 Fathom wreck Lying on a silt bottom at 105 feet

http://www.eriewrecks.com/shipwrecks/17fathom/17fathom.html

42°39′N 80°03′W / 42.650°N 80.050°W / 42.650; -80.050 (17 Fathom wreck)
Admiral 1942, Dec 2 14 died. Towing barge CLEVECO (qv), she encountered a heavy gale & began to founder. She radioed in, but C.G. was unable to locate her in the murk before she went down. Owned by Cleveland Tankers, Cleveland.

Wreck located by a commercial diver in 1969.

41°38′N 81°54′W / 41.633°N 81.900°W / 41.633; -81.900 (Admiral)
Adventure 41°38′N 82°41′W / 41.633°N 82.683°W / 41.633; -82.683 (Adventure)
SS Algeria 41°31′N 81°42′W / 41.517°N 81.700°W / 41.517; -81.700 (SS Algeria)
Alva B. 41°30′N 82°01′W / 41.500°N 82.017°W / 41.500; -82.017 (Alva B.)
America 41°49′N 82°38′W / 41.817°N 82.633°W / 41.817; -82.633 (America)
Angler 1893 A tug that caught fire and sank in Long Point.
PS Anthony Wayne 28 April 1850 A wooden hulled paddle steamer that sank after her boilers exploded. She is the oldest steamboat wreck on the Great Lakes. 41°31.00′N 82°23.00′W / 41.51667°N 82.38333°W / 41.51667; -82.38333 (PS Anthony Wayne)
PS Atlantic 20 August 1852 Paddlewheel steamer rammed and sunk off Long Point in the fifth-worst single-vessel disaster to ever occur on the Great Lakes. 42°30′N 80°05′W / 42.500°N 80.083°W / 42.500; -80.083 (Steamship Atlantic)
Arches 42°27′N 80°01′W / 42.450°N 80.017°W / 42.450; -80.017 (Arches)
Argo October 20, 1937 tank barge sank off Pelee Island with cargo of oil, considered one of the greatest pollution risks on the Lakes[3]
Armenia
Aycliffe Hall 1936 Sank off Long Point.
Bay Coal Schooner 41°33′N 81°56′W / 41.550°N 81.933°W / 41.550; -81.933 (Bay Coal Schooner)
Bow Cabin 41°56′N 82°14′W / 41.933°N 82.233°W / 41.933; -82.233 (Bow Cabin)
British Lion 1877 Ran aground off Long Point. The same storm claimed the Mediera and Elize A. Turner.
Brown Brothers 1959 Sank off Long Point. 42°37′N 80°00′W / 42.617°N 80.000°W / 42.617; -80.000 (Brown Brothers (ship))
Brunswick 42°35′N 79°24′W / 42.583°N 79.400°W / 42.583; -79.400 (Brunswick)
Canobie 42°10′N 80°00′W / 42.167°N 80.000°W / 42.167; -80.000 (Canobie)
Carlingford 42°39′N 79°28′W / 42.650°N 79.467°W / 42.650; -79.467 (Carlingford)
Cascade
Case
C.B. Benson 42°46′N 79°14′W / 42.767°N 79.233°W / 42.767; -79.233 (C.B. Benson)
C.B. Lockwood Discovered to have sunk below Lake Erie's bottom[4] 41°56′N 81°23′W / 41.933°N 81.383°W / 41.933; -81.383 (C.B. Lockwood)
Cecil J. 42°45′N 80°13′W / 42.750°N 80.217°W / 42.750; -80.217 (Cecil J.)
Charger
Charles B. Packard
Charles H. Davis 41°30′N 81°43′W / 41.500°N 81.717°W / 41.500; -81.717 (Charles H. Davis)
Charles Foster 42°10′N 80°15′W / 42.167°N 80.250°W / 42.167; -80.250 (Charles Foster)
City of Concord
City of Dresden 1922 Ran aground off Long Point.
Clarion
Cleveco 41°47′N 81°36′W / 41.783°N 81.600°W / 41.783; -81.600 (Cleveco)
Colonel Cook
Colonial
Conemaugh
Craftsman 41°31′N 82°00′W / 41.517°N 82.000°W / 41.517; -82.000 (Craftsman)
Crete 42°10′N 80°00′W / 42.167°N 80.000°W / 42.167; -80.000 (Crete)
David Stewart
David Vance
Dean Richmond 42°17′N 79°55′W / 42.283°N 79.917°W / 42.283; -79.917 (Dean Richmond)
Dundee 41°41′N 81°50′W / 41.683°N 81.833°W / 41.683; -81.833 (Dundee)
Dunkirk Schooner Site An early unidentified schooner lying off Dunkirk, New York 42°33′0″N 79°36′0″W / 42.55000°N 79.60000°W / 42.55000; -79.60000 (Dunkirk Schooner Site)
Duke Luedtke 41°41′N 81°57′W / 41.683°N 81.950°W / 41.683; -81.950 (Duke Luedtke)
Eldorado 42°10′N 80°00′W / 42.167°N 80.000°W / 42.167; -80.000 (Eldorado)
Elize A. Turner 1877 Ran aground off Long Point. The same storm claimed the British Lion and Madiera.
Elphicke 1913 Ran aground off Long Point.
Empire 1870 Ran aground off Long Point.
Erieau Quarry Stone 42°15′N 81°54′W / 42.250°N 81.900°W / 42.250; -81.900 (Erieau Quarry Stone)
F.A. Meyer 41°55′N 82°02′W / 41.917°N 82.033°W / 41.917; -82.033 (F.A. Meyer)
Fannie L. Jones 41°30′N 81°43′W / 41.500°N 81.717°W / 41.500; -81.717 (Fannie L. Jones)
Frank E. Vigor 41°57′N 81°57′W / 41.950°N 81.950°W / 41.950; -81.950 (Frank E. Vigor)
George Dunbar 41°40′N 82°33′W / 41.667°N 82.550°W / 41.667; -82.550 (George Dunbar)
George Stone
George Worthington
SS G. P. Griffith 18 June 1850 Between 241 and 289 lives lost. Third-greatest loss of life in any Great Lakes shipping disaster.
Grand Traverse
H.A. Barr 42°09′N 81°23′W / 42.150°N 81.383°W / 42.150; -81.383 (H.A. Barr)
Henry Roop 12 October 1843 A schooner lost in a storm.
H.G. Cleveland
Hickory Stick 41°32′N 82°06′W / 41.533°N 82.100°W / 41.533; -82.100 (Hickory Stick)
Idaho 1897 Ran aground off Long Point.
Indiana 42°17′N 79°59′W / 42.283°N 79.983°W / 42.283; -79.983 (Indiana)
Isabella J. Boyce June 1917 A sandsucker which grounded on Middle Bass Island in Lake Erie, caught fire, and sunk in 10 feet (3.0 m) of water. No lives were lost.
Ivanhoe 41°33′N 82°02′W / 41.550°N 82.033°W / 41.550; -82.033 (Ivanhoe)
James B. Colgate 20 October 1916 A whaleback steamer that sank off Long Point, in a storm that also took the SS Merida (lake freighter). 42°05′N 81°44′W / 42.083°N 81.733°W / 42.083; -81.733 (James B. Colgate (ship))
James J. Reed 1944 Sank off Long Point.
Jay Gould 41°51′N 82°24′W / 41.850°N 82.400°W / 41.850; -82.400 (Jay Gould)
Jennie P. King 1866 Foundered off Long Point.
Jersey City 1860 Foundered off Long Point.
J.G. McGrath 42°40′N 79°23′W / 42.667°N 79.383°W / 42.667; -79.383 (J.G. McGrath)
J.J. Boland Jr. 42°22′N 79°43′W / 42.367°N 79.717°W / 42.367; -79.717 (J.J. Boland Jr.)
John B. Griffin
John B. Lyon
John Pridgeon Jr. 41°35′N 81°58′W / 41.583°N 81.967°W / 41.583; -81.967 (John Pridgeon Jr.)
Jorge B.
Joseph Paige 14 October 1893 Ran aground off Long Point, in a gale that also took the Wocoken.
Lawrence 1921 Ran aground off Long Point.
Lake Serpent 1829
Little Wissahickon 41°54′N 81°56′W / 41.900°N 81.933°W / 41.900; -81.933 (Little Wissahickon)
Lycoming 42°15′N 81°53′W / 42.250°N 81.883°W / 42.250; -81.883 (Lycoming)
Mabel Wilson 41°30′N 81°43′W / 41.500°N 81.717°W / 41.500; -81.717 (Mabel Wilson)
Madiera 1877 Ran aground off Long Point. The same storm claimed the British Lion and Elize A. Turner.
Magnet
Margaret Olwill June 28, 1899 Overloaded with limestone, the load shifted during an unexpected June gale and the ship was capsized by waves when the steering chains broke. At least eight people perished.
Marquette & Bessemer No. 2 December 1909
Marshall F. Butters 41°43′N 82°17′W / 41.717°N 82.283°W / 41.717; -82.283 (Marshall F. Butters)
Mecosta 41°31′N 81°53′W / 41.517°N 81.883°W / 41.517; -81.883 (Mecosta)
Merida 16 October 1916 A Ward Line steamer that sank off Long Point in a storm that also took the James B. Colgate. 42°13′N 81°20′W / 42.217°N 81.333°W / 42.217; -81.333 (Meria (ship))
Morania 29 October 1951 Also includes Penobscot. Closest shipwreck to Buffalo River
M.I. Wilcox
Morning Star 41°36′N 82°12′W / 41.600°N 82.200°W / 41.600; -82.200 (Morning Star)
Mystic 1907 Sank off Long Point.
New Brunswick
Niagara 1899 Ran aground off Long Point.
North Carolina 41°43′N 81°22′W / 41.717°N 81.367°W / 41.717; -81.367 (North Carolina)
Northern Indiana July 17, 1856 Caught fire near Point au Pelee, Lake Erie, while en route from Buffalo to Monroe, Michigan.[5] 56 lives lost. 41°53′N 82°30′W / 41.883°N 82.500°W / 41.883; -82.500 (Northern Indiana)
Oneida 42°13′N 79°51′W / 42.217°N 79.850°W / 42.217; -79.850 (Oneida)
Oxford 42°28′N 79°51′W / 42.467°N 79.850°W / 42.467; -79.850 (Oxford)
Paddy Murphy
Pascal P. Pratt 1908 Ran aground off Long Point. 42°33′N 80°05′W / 42.550°N 80.083°W / 42.550; -80.083 (Pascal P. Pratt (ship))
Passaic 42°28′N 79°27′W / 42.467°N 79.450°W / 42.467; -79.450 (Passaic)
Penelope 41°31′N 82°02′W / 41.517°N 82.033°W / 41.517; -82.033 (Penelope)
Philip D. Armour 42°07′N 80°10′W / 42.117°N 80.167°W / 42.117; -80.167 (Philip D. Armour)
Philip Minch 41°41′N 82°30′W / 41.683°N 82.500°W / 41.683; -82.500 (Philip Minch)
Pocahontas 1862 Foundered off Long Point.
Queen of the West 41°50′N 82°23′W / 41.833°N 82.383°W / 41.833; -82.383 (Queen of the West)
Raleigh 29 November 1911 During a storm, the rudder broke and she ran aground about 1 mile off Wildwood Road, Sherkston, Ontario in 30 feet of water.
Rebecca Foster 1857 Foundered off Long Point.
Robert 42°15′N 81°49′W / 42.25°N 81.81°W / 42.25; -81.81 (Robert)
S.F. Gale 41°44′N 81°52′W / 41.733°N 81.867°W / 41.733; -81.867 (S.F. Gale)
S.K. Martin 42°14′N 79°56′W / 42.233°N 79.933°W / 42.233; -79.933 (S.K. Martin)
St. James Sank of unknown cause off Long Point in Lake Erie; discovered 1984. 42°27′N 80°07′W / 42.450°N 80.117°W / 42.450; -80.117 (St. James)
Sand Merchant 41°34′N 82°57′W / 41.567°N 82.950°W / 41.567; -82.950 (Sand Merchant)
Sarah E. Sheldon 41°29′N 82°06′W / 41.483°N 82.100°W / 41.483; -82.100 (Sarah E. Sheldon)
Siberia 1883 A schooner that ran aground off Long Point.
Siberia 1905 Ran aground off Long Point.
Smith A tugboat that sank under tow off Long Point, Lake Erie.
Specular
Success 41°31′N 82°54′W / 41.517°N 82.900°W / 41.517; -82.900 (Success)
Sultan 24 September 1864 Lost in a storm off of Cleveland 41°36′N 81°37′W / 41.600°N 81.617°W / 41.600; -81.617 (Sultan)
T-8 42°35′N 80°01′W / 42.583°N 80.017°W / 42.583; -80.017 (T-8)
Tasmania 41°47′N 82°29′W / 41.783°N 82.483°W / 41.783; -82.483 (Tasmania)
Tire Reef 42°41′N 80°08′W / 42.683°N 80.133°W / 42.683; -80.133 (Tire reef)
Trade Wind A schooner that collided with the Sir Charles Napier off Long Point. 42°25′N 80°12′W / 42.417°N 80.200°W / 42.417; -80.200 (Trade Wind (ship))
Tug Smith 42°28′N 79°59′W / 42.467°N 79.983°W / 42.467; -79.983 (Tug Smith)
Two Fannies 41°33′N 81°55′W / 41.550°N 81.917°W / 41.550; -81.917 (Two Fannies)
Unknown 42°08′N 81°37′W / 42.133°N 81.617°W / 42.133; -81.617
Valentine 41°55′N 81°54′W / 41.917°N 81.900°W / 41.917; -81.900 (Valentine)
Washington Irving 42°32′N 79°27′W / 42.533°N 79.450°W / 42.533; -79.450 (Washington Irving (schooner))
Wild Rover Foundered off Long Point.
William H. Vanderbilt 1883 Ran aground off Long Point.
Willis
Wilma 42°42′N 80°02′W / 42.700°N 80.033°W / 42.700; -80.033 (Wilma)
Wocoken 14 October 1893 Ran aground off Long Point in a gale that also took the Joseph Paige.
Young Phoenix 1818 Sank off Long Point, Lake Erie.

Lake Huron[edit]

Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates Image
Arabia October 1884 Barque that foundered of Echo Island near Tobermory, Ontario in 120 feet of water.
SS Argus November 9, 1913
CC Martin 1911 Tug lost with barge Albatross during storm off French River, one life lost. 45°30′56″N 81°04′13″W / 45.51555°N 81.070277°W / 45.51555; -81.070277 (CC Martin)
SS Cedarville 7 May 1965 A bulk carrier that collided with SS Topdalsfjord in the Straits of Mackinac. N45° 47.235′ W085° 40.248′
SS Charles S. Price 15 November 1913 Capsized in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. Sighted floating upside-down November 10, 1913 identified as Charles S. Price before it sank on November 15, 1913. Wreck was not found until the 60s when it was found by Resbert R. Martin. N43 11.89980 W82 23.89980
SS Choctaw 12 February 1915 Sank in a collision with the SS Wahcondah.
City of Grand Rapids 29 October 1907 The City of Grand Rapids was a double decker passenger streamer that caught fire while docked in Little Tub Harbour. For the security of the harbour, the Grand Rapids was towed out into Georgian Bay and released to burn. From there she drifted to the head of Big Tub Harbour where she burnt to the waterline and sank.
Cornelia B. Windiate 27 November 1875 Iced up and slowly sank in a storm after passing through the Straits of Mackinac.
SS Daniel J. Morrell 29 November 1966 Broke in two in a storm on Lake Huron, with the aft section coming to rest five miles from the bow. 43°51′00″N 82°35′24″W / 43.850°N 82.590°W / 43.850; -82.590 (SS Daniel J. Morrell) Daniel J. Morrell.jpg
Dorcas Pendell 6th July 1914 Shallow water shipwreck located in the harbor of Harbor Beach, Michigan. The Dorcas Pendell was a schooner built in 1884 and burned in place on July 6th 1914 after running aground.
SS D.R. Hanna 16 May 1919 A 552-foot (168 m) long steel freighter that sank in a collision with the Quincy A. Shaw.
Emma L. Nielson 26 June 1911 Collision in fog off Pointe Aux Barques.
Erie Belle 21 November 1883 A steamship that exploded while attempting to rescue the stranded schooner J. N. Carter. 44°09′24″N 81°39′32″W / 44.156741°N 81.658997°W / 44.156741; -81.658997 (Erie Belle)
Exchange
Forest City 5 June 1904 Ran aground in foggy weather near south east end of Bear's Rump Island in Georgian Bay near Tobermory. Smashed stem is in 60 feet and stern is at 150 feet depth. 45°19.0′N 81°33.0′W / 45.3167°N 81.5500°W / 45.3167; -81.5500 (SS Forest City)
Hunter Savidge Capsized off Point Aux Barques.
SS Hydrus 11 November 1913 Lost on Lake Huron during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. Its wreck was discovered in July 2015.[6] Hydrus - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
SS Isaac M. Scott 9 November 1913 A lake freighter that sank in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. 45°03′N 83°02′W / 45.050°N 83.033°W / 45.050; -83.033 (SS Isaac M. Scott) Isaac M. Scott - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
James C. King November 1901 While under tow by W.L.Wetmore, which was wrecked by a storm, the King was wrecked too at the north west end of Bonnet Island near Tobermory, Ontario in about 90 feet of water.
SS James Carruthers 9 November 1913 Lost on Lake Huron during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. 44°48′04″N 82°23′49″W / 44.801°N 82.397°W / 44.801; -82.397 (SS James Carruthers) James Carruthers - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
James Davidson 4 October 1883 Wooden bulk freighter wrecked in shallow water off the coast of Thunder Bay Island while towing a consort-barge to Duluth. While still stranded, its engine and boiler were salvaged, and the rest of it has since broken up and separated about 35 feet underwater.[7] 45°01′56.64″N 83°11′33.78″W / 45.0324000°N 83.1927167°W / 45.0324000; -83.1927167
SS John A. McGean 1913 Lost in storm off Harbor Beach in Lake Huron in the Great Storm of 1913. Wreck discovered in 1985.[6] John A. McGean - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
SS Kaliyuga October 1905 A wooden steamship lost in a storm.
Lottie Wolf 16 October 1891 This schooner broke up in gale force seas in shallow water about 200 feet of the Hope Island Lighthouse in about 30 feet of water near Midland, Ontario.
Mapledawn 30 November 1924 This steel freighter ran aground in a snow storm on the west side of Christian Island near Midland, Ontario. She is in 35 feet of water with part of the stem sticking out of the water.
Marine City Wrecked north of Sturgeon Point Light.
Metamora 30 September 1907 A wooden tug that sank near Pointe au Baril, Georgian Bay. 45°31′43.39″N 80°24′26.61″W / 45.5287194°N 80.4073917°W / 45.5287194; -80.4073917 (Metamora (shipwreck))
Michigan November 1943 While removing grain from the stranded Riverton at the north west end of Hope Island near Midland, Ontario, high winds blew her into shallow waters grounding her in 20 feet of water.
Monohansett 23 November 1907 The wooden steam barge sank after catching fire near Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron. As the wreck took place near the island's Life Saving Station, no lives were lost.[8] 45°01′59.76″N 83°11′59.28″W / 45.0332667°N 83.1998000°W / 45.0332667; -83.1998000
SS Monrovia 26 May 1959 A cargo ship that collided with SS Royalston north of Thunder Bay Island. 44°35′25″N 82°33′12″W / 44.59028°N 82.55333°W / 44.59028; -82.55333 (SS Monrovia)
SS Ohio (1875) 26 September 1894 A wooden freighter that sank in a collision with the schooner Ironton.
Philo Scoville October 1889 Wrecked during a storm and is in 100 feet at north east end of Bonnet Island near Tobermory, Ontario.
SS Regina 10 November 1913 Lost on Lake Huron during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. Regina - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
Sweepstakes September 1885 A schooner that was damaged off Cove Island in August, then sank a month later in Big Tub Harbour, near Tobermory. 45°15′18″N 81°40′50″W / 45.25500°N 81.68056°W / 45.25500; -81.68056 (=Sweepstakes)
True North II 16 June 2000 A glass-bottomed tour boat that sank in Georgian Bay, killing two students.
Typo 14 October 1899 The wooden three-masted schooner was run down by the steamer W.P. Ketcham. The ship sank immediately and the four crew on board drowned.[9] 45°24′55″N 83°33′51″W / 45.41528°N 83.56417°W / 45.41528; -83.56417
PS Waubuno 22 November 1879 A side-wheel paddle steamer lost in a storm in Georgian Bay. 45°07′15″N 80°09′58″W / 45.12083°N 80.16611°W / 45.12083; -80.16611 (=PS Waubuno)
W.L. Wetmore November 1901 Wrecked in a storm at the west end of Bonnet Island in about 30 feet of water, near Tobermory, Ontario.
SS Wexford 9 November 1913 Lost on Lake Huron during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. Wexford - Lake Huron shipwrecks.jpg
Minnedosa 20 October 1905 Sank while in tow, near Harbor Beach, Michigan; 9 crew and passengers lost.

Lake Michigan[edit]

Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates
SS Alpena 15 October 1880 A sidewheel steamer that capsized in a storm.
Alvin Clark 19 June 1864 A schooner that sank off the shore of Chambers Island. It was raised in 1969 and taken to Menominee, where it became a tourist attraction. However, it quickly deteriorated, and was demolished in 1994 to make way for a parking lot. 45°06′15″N 87°37′13″W / 45.104167°N 87.620278°W / 45.104167; -87.620278 (Alvin Clark (schooner))
SS Anna C. Minch 11 November 1940 A cargo carrier that broke in two and sank during the Armistice Day Blizzard. 43°47′13″N 86°31′52″W / 43.787°N 86.531°W / 43.787; -86.531 (SS Anna C. Minch)
SS Appomattox 2 November 1905 A bulk cargo steamship that ran aground in fog. 43°05′37.09″N 87°51′58.35″W / 43.0936361°N 87.8662083°W / 43.0936361; -87.8662083 (SS Appomattox)
SS Australasia 18 November 1896 A wooden steamship that sank after burning to a total loss. 44°55.20′N 87°11.13′W / 44.92000°N 87.18550°W / 44.92000; -87.18550 (SS Australasia)
The Brick
SS Carl D. Bradley 18 November 1958 A self-unloading Great Lakes freighter caught in a vicious storm on Lake Michigan.
SS Chicora 21 January 1895 A steamer that went missing in Lake Michigan
Christina Nilsson 23 October 1884 A schooner that sank in a blizzard off Baileys Harbor.
Continental 1904 A bulk carrier that sank off the coast of Two Rivers.
Daniel Lyons 17 October 1878 A schooner that collided with the Kate Gillett off Algoma.
SS Eber Ward 20 April 1909 A cargo ship that foundered in heavy ice west of Mackinaw City.
Erie L. Hackley 3 October 1903 A cargo liner that sank in a storm near Green Island, Wisconsin. 45°03.71′N 87°27.37′W / 45.06183°N 87.45617°W / 45.06183; -87.45617 (Erie L. Hackley)
SS Eastland 24 July 1915 Rolled over in the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois.
Fleetwing 26 September 1888 A schooner that ran aground off the coast of Liberty Grove.
SS Francisco Morazan 29 November 1960 Grounded and became a total loss in 1960 off the south shore of South Manitou Island. She ran over the wreck of the bulk freighter SS Walter L Frost.
Frank O'Connor 3 October 1919 A bulk carrier that caught fire and sank off the coast of North Bay. 45°06′52″N 87°0′44″W / 45.11444°N 87.01222°W / 45.11444; -87.01222 (Frank O'Connor)
Gallinipper 1851 A schooner that sank in a gale off the coast of Centerville.
Grape Shot November 1867 A schooner that was run aground by a gale off the coast of Plum Island.
Green Bay An unidentified sloop off the coast of Sevastopol, believed to date from 1840-1860.
Grace Channon 1877 A three-masted wooden schooner that collided with the propeller tug Favourite 12 miles south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[10]
Hanover November 1867 A schooner that struck a shoal near the Strawberry Islands.
Hennepin (shipwreck) 18 August 1927 The first self-unloading bulk carrier; sprang a leak off the east coast of Lake Michigan.
Home 1858 A schooner that collided with the William Fiske off the coast of Centerville.
Iris 1913 A schooner that ran aground off the coast of Washington Island.
Joys 23 December 1898 A steamboat that caught fire at anchor in the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal.
Lady Elgin 8 September 1860 A steamship wrecked in Lake Michigan near Chicago following a collision with the schooner Augusta. The greatest loss of life on open water in the Great Lakes. 42°11′00″N 87°39′00″W / 42.18333°N 87.65000°W / 42.18333; -87.65000 (PS Lady Elgin)
SS Lakeland 3 December 1924 A steel freighter that sank after she sprang a leak. 44°47.34′N 87°11.32′W / 44.78900°N 87.18867°W / 44.78900; -87.18867 (SS Lakeland)
Louisiana 8 November 1913 A steamboat that caught fire in a snowstorm off Washington.
L.R. Doty 25 October 1898 A steamship lost in a violent storm while towing the Olive Jeanette.
Lumberman 6 April 1893 A schooner that sank in a storm off the coast of Oak Creek.
Meridian October 1873 A schooner that sank off the coast off Sister Bay.
SS Milwaukee 22 October 1929 Train ferry that sank in a storm off Milwaukee with the loss of all hands. Today she lies about four miles northeast of the North Point Lighthouse.[11]
Mount Vernon
Niagara 23 September 1856 A palace steamer that caught fire and sank off Belgium, Wisconsin.
Northerner 29 November 1868 A schooner that capsized off Port Washington.
Ocean Wave 23 September 1869 A scow schooner that sank in a storm off the coast of Door County.
Phoenix 21 November 1847 Wooden steamship that caught fire from over-stoked boilers and burned to the waterline off the coast of Sheboygan, WI, killing at least 190 but perhaps more than 250 of the nearly 300 souls on board. 39 people survived in lifeboats and three were rescued from the water.[12]
R. J. Hackett 12 November 1905 The first Great Lakes freighter; caught fire, ran aground and sank in Green Bay. 45°21′28″N 87°10′55″W / 45.35778°N 87.18194°W / 45.35778; -87.18194 (R. J. Hackett (steamer))
Rosinco 19 September 1928 A luxury yacht that sank off the coast of Kenosha.
Rouse Simmons 23 November 1912 Sunk in a storm on Lake Michigan with its cargo of Christmas trees.
Success 26 November 1896 Pushed ashore by a gale during a storm off the coast of Sevastopol, Wisconsin.
Tennie and Laura 2 August 1903 A scow schooner that sank off Port Washington.
Three Brothers 27 September 1911 A lumber freighter that took on water and was driven aground on South Manitou Island.
S.B. Toledo 22 October 1856 79 of 81 passengers and crew were lost when she sank near Port Washington, Wisconsin in 10 to 35 feet of water. Also carried freight. Wood hull, propeller/direct acting steam engine built by B.B. Jones Co, Buffalo, New York 1854.
SS Selah Chamberlain 13 October 1886 Sank two miles northeast of Sheboygan. 43°46.196′N 087°39.401′W / 43.769933°N 87.656683°W / 43.769933; -87.656683 (SS Selah Chamberlain)
SS William B. Davock 11 November 1940 Sank near Pentwater in the Armistice Day Blizzard.
SS Wisconsin October 1929 A steamboat that sank off the coast of Kenosha.
Thomas Hume 21 May 1891 A schooner that disappeared on Lake Michigan.
SS W.H. Gilcher 28 October 1892 The Gilcher was a steel hulled freighter that went missing on Lake Michigan on 28 October 1892.
SS Pere Marquette 18 9 September 1910 A steel hulled car ferry that mysteriously flooded, and sank on Lake Michigan.
SS John V. Moran 7 February 1899 A wooden hulled freighter that sunk when a piece of ice punched a hole in her hull.
SS Henry Cort 30 November 1934 A whaleback freighter that ran aground at Muskegon, Michigan.

Lake Ontario[edit]

Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates
Alberta A Lake tug with the appearance of an Alligator Tug from the Ottawa River logging days, sank near Bay of Quinte.
Aloha 1917 Sunk while in tow of the CW Chamberlain off Nine Mile Point
Annie Falconer 1904 A schooner that sank in a storm en route to Picton. One crew member perished of exposure upon reaching Amherst Island.
Augustus A schooner that sank en route to be scuttled during the 1937 Portsmouth harbour cleanup.
Bay State November 4, 1862 Screw propeller, sank in storm. Wreck discovered August 2015[13]
Belle Sheridan November 7, 1880 A 123-foot two masted schooner. She was carrying coal en route to Toronto when caught in the Gale of 1880 and after fighting for hours, sank in 12 feet of water in Wellers Bay. Only one of the crew of seven survived.
Black Duck 1872 A 51-foot single mast scow sloop that sank in the East end of Lake Erie in August 1872.
China 1872 A small steamer that caught fire and sank off False Duck Island, six months after launching.
City of Sheboygan 1925 Sank in a storm off Amherst Island with the loss of 5 people.
Comet 1861 A paddlewheeler that sunk in a collision with the schooner Exchange off Nine Mile Point, with the loss of 2 lives.
Cornwall 1931 A paddlewheeler scuttled in the Amherst Island graveyard.
Dominion
Dredge Islander A dredge scuttled in the Snake Island graveyard after harbour cleanup in the 1930s.
Dupont Salvage Scow Scuttled near Dupont Point, perhaps after the Elevator Bay cleanup.
Effie Mae 1993 A charter boat that was scuttled beside the Aloha for a diving attraction
Empress A steamer scuttled in the Amherst Island Graveyard. Real name unknown.
Frontenac Tug.
George A. Marsh 17 August 1917 A schooner that was sunk during a heavy gale off Pigeon Island. Twelve of fourteen crew and passengers died.[14]
George T Davie Barge.
Glendora A steamer that was scuttled in the Amherst Island Graveyard. Real name unknown.
USS Hamilton 8 August 1813 A US Navy schooner that sunk in a squall off Fourteen Mile Creek. A US sister ship the Scourge sank in the same squall.
Hilda Wrecker.
Katie Eccles Ran aground near Kingston on Lake Ontario.
KPH Wreck A flat barge 100' long that sank near Kingston Psychiatric Hospital.
Londonderry Wrecker.
Maple Glen Steamer.
Marine Museum 2 Scow.
Mark One Tug.
Monkey Wrench A schooner that was scuttled in the Amherst Island Graveyard. Real name unknown.
Munson 30 April 1890 A dredger that sank in 4 minutes due to leaking plank, off Lemoine Point.[14]
Nisbet Grammer 26 May 1926 A lake freighter that sank in a collision with the Dalwarnic off Somerset.
SS Noronic 17 September 1949 A Great Lakes cruise ship that burned and sank at Toronto dock, with over 100 passengers killed.
Ocean Wave 1853 Paddlewheeler.
Olive Branch Schooner.
Oliver Mowat Schooner.
HMS Ontario 31 October 1780 A British 22-gun brig-sloop sunk in a storm on Lake Ontario, discovered in 2008. The oldest shipwreck ever found on the Great Lakes.
St. Peter 27 October 1898 A schooner that was wrecked near Pultneyville. 43°18′42″N 77°7′52″W / 43.31167°N 77.13111°W / 43.31167; -77.13111 (St. Peter (shipwreck))
Queen Mary A steamer that was scuttled in the Amherst Island Graveyard. Real name unknown.
R.H. Rae Schooner.
Ricky's Tug Scuttled in the Amherst Island Graveyard. Real name unknown.
HMS St Lawrence A wooden warship that served in the War of 1812. The ship was decommissioned and her hull was used as a storage facility by Morton's Brewery in Kingston. In January 1832, the hull was sold to Robert Drummond for £25. Later, it was sunk close to shore, and is now a popular diving attraction. 44°13′14″N 76°30′18″W / 44.22056°N 76.50500°W / 44.22056; -76.50500 (HMS St Lawrence (1814))
S.M. Douglas A former White Star dredger.
HMS Speedy 8 October 1804 A schooner that sank off Brighton, Lake Ontario. 43°48′50″N 76°47′20″W / 43.814°N 76.789°W / 43.814; -76.789 (HMS Speedy (1798))
USS Sylph 1823 A schooner that served in the War of 1812.
Terry's Tug Tug.
HMS Toronto 1811 A schooner that sank off Hanlan's Point, Toronto Islands, Lake Ontario.
Unknown 43°27′N 77°26′W / 43.450°N 77.433°W / 43.450; -77.433
Washington 1803 Commercial sloop owned by Canadians, built by Americans on Lake Erie, sunk off Oswego.[15]
Waterlily Steam barge.
William Jamieson Schooner.
William Johnston A tug that sank off 9-Mile Point. 44°07′N 76°33′W / 44.117°N 76.550°W / 44.117; -76.550 (William Johnston)
HMS Wolfe (later HMS Montreal) A freshwater sloop of war that served in the War of 1812. She was ordered broken up and sold in 1831, and is presumed to have rotted and sunk at Kingston. The wreck, identified as HMS Montreal by Parks Canada in 2006, lies near the Royal Military College of Canada. 44°13′N 76°27′W / 44.217°N 76.450°W / 44.217; -76.450 (HMS Wolfe (1813))
Wolfe Islander II Car ferry.

Lake Superior[edit]

Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates
SS Algoma 7 November 1885 Ran aground off the shore of Mott Island. 48°6′41″N 88°31′55″W / 48.11139°N 88.53194°W / 48.11139; -88.53194 (SS Algoma)
Amboy 1905 Ran aground during the Mataafa Storm of 1905. 47°28.674′N 90°59.898′W / 47.477900°N 90.998300°W / 47.477900; -90.998300 (Amboy)
SS America 7 June 1928 A passenger and delivery ship that ran aground on a reef off the shore of Isle Royale. 47°53′39″N 89°13′15″W / 47.89417°N 89.22083°W / 47.89417; -89.22083 (SS America)
Antelope 7 October 1897 Schooner-barge sank near Apostle Islands. Wreck discovered in 2016 near Michigan Island[16]
SS Arlington 1 May 1940 A steamship that broke apart in heavy seas. 48°27′29″N 87°40′12″W / 48.458°N 87.670°W / 48.458; -87.670 (SS Arlington)
SS Bannockburn 21 November 1902 A steel hulled freighter that went missing on Lake Superior.
SS Benjamin Noble 28 April 1914 Lost off Duluth; found 2004.[17] 46°56′N 91°40′W / 46.933°N 91.667°W / 46.933; -91.667 (SS Benjamin Noble)
Big Bay sloop Unidentified sloop believed to date from 1880-1920.
Chester A. Congdon 6 November 1918 A bulk steel freighter that ran aground in fog off Isle Royale. 48°11′36″N 88°30′52″W / 48.19333°N 88.51444°W / 48.19333; -88.51444 (Chester A. Congdon)
City of Ashland 8 August 1887 A steam powered tugboat, which caught fire near the shore of its namesake city, Ashland, Wisconsin.
City of Bangor 30 November 1926 A steamer that was stranded in a storm with a cargo of 248 Chryslers.
Comet 26 August 1875 Cargo and passenger steamship that suffered a series of maritime accidents before her final collision with the Manitoba in Whitefish Bay. 46°43.02′N 84°52.00′W / 46.71700°N 84.86667°W / 46.71700; -84.86667 (Comet)
SS Cumberland 25 July 1887 A paddlewheeler that struck a reef near Rock of Ages Light. 47°51′28″N 89°19′32″W / 47.85778°N 89.32556°W / 47.85778; -89.32556 (SS Cumberland)
SS Cyprus 11 October 1907 A lake freighter that capsized near Deer Park. 46°47′N 85°36′W / 46.79°N 85.60°W / 46.79; -85.60 (SS Cyprus)
SS D.M. Clemson 1 December 1908 Went missing on Lake Superior on 1 December 1908.
SS Edmund Fitzgerald 10 November 1975 Lost in a storm on Lake Superior, the Fitzgerald is one of the largest ships to have sunk in the Great Lakes. The exact cause of the disaster has never been made clear, and has been the subject of much discussion. 46°59.91′N 85°06.61′W / 46.99850°N 85.11017°W / 46.99850; -85.11017 (SS Edmund Fitzgerald)
SS Emperor 4 June 1947 A freighter that ran aground off Isle Royale. 48°12′2″N 88°29′30″W / 48.20056°N 88.49167°W / 48.20056; -88.49167 (SS Emperor)
USS Essex 13 October 1931 A decommissioned U.S. Navy steam sloop that was scrapped and burned to the waterline. Her hull is the only surviving remnant of a vessel built by Donald McKay.[18] 46°42′46″N 92°01′43″W / 46.71278°N 92.02861°W / 46.71278; -92.02861 (USS Essex)
SS George Spencer 28 November 1905 A wooden freighter that ran aground in the Mataafa Storm of 1905. 47°28.41′N 90°59.59′W / 47.47350°N 90.99317°W / 47.47350; -90.99317 (SS George Spencer)
SS Glenlyon 1 November 1924 A freighter that ran aground off Menagerie Island. 47°57′8″N 88°44′53″W / 47.95222°N 88.74806°W / 47.95222; -88.74806 (SS Glenlyon)
Gunilda 11 August 1911 A yacht that ran up on McGarvey's Shoals, Lake Superior. 48°45′N 87°23′W / 48.750°N 87.383°W / 48.750; -87.383 (Gunilda)
SS George M. Cox A ship that ran aground on a calm day.
Harriet B May 3, 1922 Lost off Two Harbors after being rammed in fog.
SS Henry B. Smith 10 November 1913 Lost in Lake Superior during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. 46°54′50″N 87°19′59″W / 46.914°N 87.333°W / 46.914; -87.333 (SS Henry B. Smith)
SS Henry Chisholm 20 October 1898 A wooden freighter that sank off the shore of Isle Royale. 47°51′28″N 89°19′32″W / 47.85778°N 89.32556°W / 47.85778; -89.32556 (SS Henry Chisholm)
SS Henry Steinbrenner 11 May 1953 Great Lakes freighter lost in Lake Superior.
Hesper 1905, May 3 A Wooden bulk-freighter steamship that sank in a snowstorm at Silver Bay. 47°16′17″N 91°16′18″W / 47.27139°N 91.27167°W / 47.27139; -91.27167 (Hesper)
SS Hudson 16 September 1901 An iron hulled steamer that was lost with all hands off Eagle Harbor. 47°35′N 88°10′W / 47.583°N 88.167°W / 47.583; -88.167 (SS Hudson)
SS Iosco 2 September 1905 A wooden steamer that sank near the Huron Islands
Ira H. Owen November 28, 1905 Early steel steamer lost off Outer Island with all hands 46°58.939′N 090°13.292′W / 46.982317°N 90.221533°W / 46.982317; -90.221533 (Ira H. Owen)
Invincible 1816 A wooden ship employed in the fur trade by the Northwest Company. It sank in a storm. Generally considered to be the first recorded ship to sink in the Great Lakes.
J. S. Seaverns 10 May 1884 Sank off Michipicoten, no lives lost. Wreck discovered in 2016.[19][20]
SS John B. Cowle (1902) 12 July 1909 Sank in Whitefish Bay with the loss of 14 lives after colliding with the Isaac M. Scott.[21] 46°44.435′N 84°57.877′W / 46.740583°N 84.964617°W / 46.740583; -84.964617 (SS John B. Cowle)
John M. Osborn 27 July 1884 Wooden steam barge rammed by 'terror of the lakes' Alberta. 46°51.974′N 85°05.210′W / 46.866233°N 85.086833°W / 46.866233; -85.086833 (John M. Osborn)
SS Kamloops 7 December 1927 A Canadian canaller that sank off Isle Royale. 48°5′6″N 88°45′53″W / 48.08500°N 88.76472°W / 48.08500; -88.76472 (SS Kamloops)
SS Lafayette 28 November 1905 A steel hulled bulk freighter that broke in half near Two Harbors, Minnesota.
SS Lambton 18 April 1922 Canadian lighthouse tender that sank in Whitefish Bay
Lucerne November 1886 A commercial schooner that sank off the coast of Long Island. 46°43.389′N 90°46.035′W / 46.723150°N 90.767250°W / 46.723150; -90.767250 (Lucerne)
Madeira 28 November 1905 A casualty of the Mataafa Storm in 1905. 47°12′22″N 91°21′29″W / 47.20611°N 91.35806°W / 47.20611; -91.35806 (Madeira (shipwreck))
Marquette 1903 A bulk freighter that sank off Michigan Island. 46°49.912′N 90°25.784′W / 46.831867°N 90.429733°W / 46.831867; -90.429733 (Marquette)
May Flower June 2, 1891 Two-masted scow schooner that capsized off the Lester River.[22] 46°48′12″N 92°00′40″W / 46.80333°N 92.01111°W / 46.80333; -92.01111 (May Flower)
Miztec 13 May 1921 A schooner barge that survived the 1919 storm that took her partner, the SS Myron. The Miztec's good fortune ended when she sank in 1921 with the loss of all hands. She came to rest next to the Myron. 46°48.073′N 85°04.500′W / 46.801217°N 85.075000°W / 46.801217; -85.075000 (Miztec)
SS M.M. Drake 2 October 1901 Sank off Vermilion Point on Lake Superior.[21] 46°46.588′N 85°05.933′W / 46.776467°N 85.098883°W / 46.776467; -85.098883 (SS M.M. Drake)
SS Monarch 6 December 1906 A passenger and delivery freighter lost in a storm off Isle Royale. 48°11′20″N 88°26′3″W / 48.18889°N 88.43417°W / 48.18889; -88.43417 (SS Monarch)
Moonlight September 1903 A schooner that sank off the coast of Michigan Island. 46°49.939′N 90°22.703′W / 46.832317°N 90.378383°W / 46.832317; -90.378383 (Moonlight)
SS Myron 23 November 1919 Lumber hooker lost in a storm on Lake Superior. 46°48.463′N 85°01.646′W / 46.807717°N 85.027433°W / 46.807717; -85.027433 (SS Myron)
Niagara 4 June 1904 Large wooden rafting tug ran aground at Knife Island 46°56′45″N 91°46′16″W / 46.945751°N 91.771245°W / 46.945751; -91.771245 (Niagara)
Noquebay 6 October 1905 A wooden schooner that caught fire and sank off Stockton Island. 46°55.568′N 90°32.717′W / 46.926133°N 90.545283°W / 46.926133; -90.545283 (Noquebay)
SS Onoko 14 September 1915 Sprang a leak and sank near Knife River 46°50.772′N 91°46.640′W / 46.846200°N 91.777333°W / 46.846200; -91.777333 (SS Onoko)
Ottawa 13 November 1909 A tugboat that caught fire after rescuing a stranded steamboat.
Pretoria 1905 A schooner-barge that sank off Outer Island in 1905. 47°05.36′N 90°23.66′W / 47.08933°N 90.39433°W / 47.08933; -90.39433 (Pretoria)
USS Puritan 27 May 1933 A commercial steamship (renamed George M. Cox in 1933) that struck a reef near Rock of Ages Light. 47°51′28″N 89°19′32″W / 47.85778°N 89.32556°W / 47.85778; -89.32556 (USS Puritan)
R.G. Stewart 4 June 1899 A commercial Packet steamer that caught fire and sank off the coast of Michigan Island.
SS Robert Wallace 17 November 1902 A wooden freighter that sank after her stern pipe burst. 46°50.837′N 91°43.736′W / 46.847283°N 91.728933°W / 46.847283; -91.728933 (SS Robert Wallace)
SS Sagamore 29 July 1901 A whaleback barge, sank in a collision with Northern Queen near Iroquois Point in Whitefish Bay. 46°31.085′N 84°37.935′W / 46.518083°N 84.632250°W / 46.518083; -84.632250 (SS Sagamore)
SS Samuel Mather 21 November 1891 Sank in a collision with the Brazil off Iroquois Point in Whitefish Bay with no loss of life.[21] 46°34.308′N 084°42.325′W / 46.571800°N 84.705417°W / 46.571800; -84.705417 (SS Samuel Mather)
Samuel P. Ely 30 October 1896 A schooner lost off Two Harbors 47°00′42″N 91°40′40″W / 47.01167°N 91.67778°W / 47.01167; -91.67778 (Samuel P. Ely)
SS Scotiadoc 20 June 1953 Rammed by the freighter Burlington in heavy fog off Trowbridge Island, near the Sleeping Giant.
Sevona 2 September 1905 A steamboat that ran aground off the coast of Sand Island. 47°00.410′N 90°54.520′W / 47.006833°N 90.908667°W / 47.006833; -90.908667 (Sevona)
SS Superior City 20 August 1920 Collided with Willis L. King in Whitefish Bay. 46°43.51′N 84°52.37′W / 46.72517°N 84.87283°W / 46.72517; -84.87283 (SS Superior City)
T.H. Camp 16 November 1900 A wooden tugboat that sank between Madeline and Basswood Islands.
SS Theano 17 November 1906 A steel ocean steamer that sank in deep water after striking a reef. 48°18′N 88°52′W / 48.300°N 88.867°W / 48.300; -88.867 (SS Theano)
Thomas Wilson 7 June 1902 Struck by the wooden steamer George Hadley and sunk less than a mile out of the Duluth Ship Canal.[23] 46°47′0″N 92°4′10″W / 46.78333°N 92.06944°W / 46.78333; -92.06944 (Thomas Wilson)
SS Vienna 17 September 1892 Rammed by Nipigon in Whitefish Bay. 46°44′N 84°57′W / 46.733°N 84.950°W / 46.733; -84.950 (SS Vienna)
SS William C. Moreland 18 October 1910 A 600 ft (180 m) long steel hulled bulk freighter that ran aground on Sawtooth Reef. 47°24.84′N 88°19.73′W / 47.41400°N 88.32883°W / 47.41400; -88.32883 (SS William C. Moreland)
SS Western Reserve 30 August 1892 Broke in two in a summer storm on Lake Superior.

Largest wrecks[edit]

Largest shipwrecks on the Great Lakes
Ship In service Out of service Length (ft) Vessel type Launched Final disposition Notes Coordinates
Leecliffe Hall May 19, 1961 September 5, 1964 730 Lake freighter September 23, 1961 Sank in the St. Lawrence River The Leecliffe Hall was a Canadian Great Lakes freighter that sank in a collision with the Greek vessel MV Apollonia in heavy fog 65 miles below Quebec in the St. Lawrence River. Three lives were lost.
SS Edmund Fitzgerald September 24, 1958 November 10, 1975 729 Lake freighter June 7, 1958 Sank on Lake Superior The Edmund Fitzgerald was 729-foot long freighter that sank of an unknown cause in a storm on Lake Superior. The Fitzgerald is the largest ship to sink on the lakes. 46°59.91′N 85°06.61′W / 46.99850°N 85.11017°W / 46.99850; -85.11017 (SS Edmund Fitzgerald)
SS Carl D. Bradley July 28, 1927 November 18, 1958 639 Self-unloading Bulk carrier April 9, 1927 Broke in two in a severe storm on Lake Michigan The Carl D. Bradley was a Great Lakes freighter that had a 31-year career that suddenly ended in 1958 when she broke in two in a severe November storm on Lake Michigan.
SS Daniel J. Morrell September 24, 1906 November 29, 1966 603 Lake freighter August 22, 1906 Sank on Lake Huron The Daniel J. Morrell was a Great Lakes bulk carrier that with only one survivor; 26-year old watchman Dennis Hale of Ashtabula, Ohio. 43°51′00″N 82°35′24″W / 43.850°N 82.590°W / 43.850; -82.590 (SS Daniel J. Morrell)
SS William C Moreland September 1, 1910 October 18, 1910 600 Lake freighter July 27, 1910 Ran aground on Sawtooth Reef The William C. Moreland was a Great Lakes bulk carrier that ran aground due to poor visibility on Sawtooth Reef, Lake Superior.
SS Cedarville 1927 May 7, 1965 588.3 Self-unloading Bulk carrier April 9, 1927 Sank in the Straits of Mackinac The Cedarville was a self-unloading freighter that sank in the Straits of Mackinac after being rammed by the M/V Topdalsfjord. Ten of the crew drowned when the ship sank. 45°47′08″N 84°40′08″W / 45.78556°N 84.66889°W / 45.78556; -84.66889 (SS Cedarville)
SS Chester A. Congdon 1907 November 6, 1918 552 Lake freighter August 29, 1907 Ran aground on Canoe Rocks The Chester A. Congdon was a steel hulled bulk carrier that stranded in heavy fog on Canoe Rocks, near Isle Royale. 48°11′36″N 88°30′52″W / 48.19333°N 88.51444°W / 48.19333; -88.51444 (Chester A. Congdon (ship))
SS D.R. Hanna 1906 May 16, 1919 552 Lake freighter October 20, 1906 Sank in a collision The D.R. Hanna was a steel hulled freighter that sank on May 16, 1919 in a collision with the Quincy A. Shaw north of Thunder Bay Island, Lake Huron.
SS James C. Carruthers 1913 November 9, 1913 550 Lake freighter May 22, 1913 Foundered on Lake Huron, in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 The James C. Carruthers was a 550-foot (170 m) long Canadian freighter that foundered in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. 44°48′04″N 82°23′49″W / 44.801°N 82.397°W / 44.801; -82.397 (SS James Carruthers)
SS Henry B. Smith 1906 November 10, 1913 545 Lake freighter May 2, 1906 Sank in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 the Henry B. Smith was an American bulk freighter that foundered in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 near Marquette, Michigan. Her wreck was discovered in 2013 by a team of divers led by Jerry Eliason. 46°54′50″N 87°19′59″W / 46.914°N 87.333°W / 46.914; -87.333 (SS Henry B. Smith)
SS Emperor May 3, 1911 June 4, 1947 525 Lake freighter December 17, 1910 Sank after striking the north side of Canoe Rocks The Emperor was a Canadian freighter owned by Canada Steamship Lines Ltd. that sank after striking the north side of Canoe Rocks near Isle Royale. 48°12′2″N 88°29′30″W / 48.20056°N 88.49167°W / 48.20056; -88.49167 (SS Emperor)
SS Isaac M. Scott 12 July 1909 11 November 1913 524 Lake freighter July 2, 1909 Capsized on Lake Huron in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 The Isaac M. Scott was an American bulk carrier that sank on Lake Huron in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. She was discovered in 1976, laying upside down, and half buried in mud under 180-feet (155m) of water. 45°03′N 83°02′W / 45.050°N 83.033°W / 45.050; -83.033 (SS Isaac M. Scott)
SS Charles S. Price 1910 November 9, 1913 524 Lake freighter 1910 Foundered in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913 The Charles S. Price Capsized on Lake Huron in the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. She was discovered floating upside down near Port Huron.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum Archived 2009-12-17 at the Wayback Machine., accessed 28 Feb 2009
  2. ^ a b Thompson, Mark L. (2000). Graveyard of the Lakes. Wayne State University Press, Detroit. pp. 17, 18, 22, 315, 317–330. ISBN 978-0-8143-3226-9.
  3. ^ Crews working to identify leak in shipwreck suspected to be the Argo, cleveland.com, October 25, 2015
  4. ^ Erica Blake (19 March 2012). "Vanished shipwreck's secret revealed". Toledo Blade. Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  5. ^ "Terrible Disaster--Burning of the Steamer Northern Indiana--Great Loss of Life". Detroit Free Press. 18 Jul 1856. p. 1. Retrieved 5 January 2016 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b Man discovers Lake Huron shipwreck missing since 1913, Jim Schaefer, Detroit Free Press, November 9, 2015
  7. ^ "James Davidson". Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. NOAA.
  8. ^ "Monohansett". Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. NOAA.
  9. ^ "Typo". Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. NOAA.
  10. ^ "Grace Channon". Shipwreck Explorers. Retrieved April 24, 2013.
  11. ^ "Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Edmund Fitzgerald". Worldpress Blog. March 26, 2011. Retrieved 6 September 2017. Shipwrecks - SS Milwaukee
  12. ^ "Shipwrecks". Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  13. ^ 153-year-old shipwreck found in Lake Ontario, Michael Pearson, CNN, October 22, 2015
  14. ^ a b Kohl, C. 1997. Treacherous Waters: Kingston's Shipwrecks. Cris Kohl. Canada. ISBN 0-9681437-0-9
  15. ^ Carola, Chris (17 August 2016). "Explorers find 2nd-oldest confirmed shipwreck in Great Lakes". Associated Press. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  16. ^ 'Spectacularly intact’: 119-year-old shipwreck found near Apostle Islands, DSuluth News Tribune, Andrew Krueger, September 13, 2016
  17. ^ "Benjamin Noble Shipwreck Found". Lakesuperior.com. 19 July 2005. Retrieved 27 April 2010.
  18. ^ "U.S.S. Essex". Lake Superior Shipwrecks. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2018-08-04.
  19. ^ J. S. Seaverns (Propeller), sunk, 10 May 1884, Maritime History of the Great Lakes
  20. ^ Lake Superior shipwreck discovered, and even the dishes survived, Andrew Krueger, Forum News Service, November 2, 2016],
  21. ^ a b c "Great Lakes Vessels Online Index". Bowling Green State University. Retrieved 7 February 2009.
  22. ^ Meverden, Keith; Tamara Thomsen (January 2012). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: May Flower - Shipwreck (draft)" (PDF). Minnesota Historical Society. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-08-09.
  23. ^ "Thomas Wilson". Lake Superior Shipwrecks. Minnesota Historical Society. 1996. Retrieved 2018-08-04.

External links[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Kohl, Cris (2008). The Great Lakes Diving Guide (2nd ed.). West Chicago: Seawolf Communications. ISBN 0967997690. Thumbnail histories, descriptions and locations of more than 1,000 Great Lakes shipwrecks located to date.
  • Kohl, Cris; Forsberg, Joan (2007). Shipwrecks at Death's Door (1st ed.). West Chicago, IL: Seawolf. ISBN 0967997682.. A guide to hundreds of northern Lake Michigan shipwrecks.
  • Kohl, Cris (2005). The 100 Best Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, Lake Huron (2nd ed.). West Chicago, IL: Seawolf Communications. ISBN 0967997658. Detailed stories of 100 significant shipwrecks, plus, in appendices, brief information about several hundreds more.
  • Kohl, Cris (2005). The 100 Best Great Lakes Shipwrecks: Lake Michigan, Lake Superior (2nd ed.). West Chicago, IL: Seawolf Communications. ISBN 0967997666. Detailed stories of 100 significant shipwrecks, plus, in appendices, brief information about several hundreds more.
  • Wachter, Georgann & Michael (2003). Erie Wrecks East: A Guide to Shipwrecks of Eastern Lake Erie (2nd ed.). Avon Lake, Ohio: CorporateImpact. ISBN 096613124X. Identifies 110 wreck locations.
  • Wachter, Georgann & Michael (2001). Erie Wrecks West: A Guide to Shipwrecks of Western Lake Erie (2nd ed.). Avon Lake, Ohio: CorporateImpact. ISBN 0966131223. Identifies 103 wreck locations.
  • Wachter, Georgann & Michael (2007). Erie Wrecks & Lights. Avon Lake, OH: CorporateImpact. ISBN 0966131258. Identifies 45 wreck locations.