List of state highway spurs in Kansas

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Kansas state highway spurs
K-22 marker K-131 marker K-368 marker
Highway markers for K-22, K-131, and K-368
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate nn (I-nn)
US HighwaysU.S. Highway nn (US-nn)
StateK-nn
System links
  • Kansas State Highway System

The Kansas state highway system includes and has included many state highway spurs that connect through highways with places that are not along a through highway. The Kansas Department of Transportation and its predecessor agencies have established most of these highways to serve small cities. In most cases, the spur highway connecting a through route with a city ends at the city limit of the city. The spur highways also serve unincorporated villages, state institutions like psychiatric hospitals, state parks and other Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism–administered facilities, and historic sites.


K-22[edit]

K-22
LocationHaddam
Length3.087 mi[1] (4.968 km)
Existed1941–

K-22 is a 3.087-mile-long (4.968 km) spur route that serves the city of Haddam in west central Washington County.[1][2]

Browse numbered routes
K-21K-23

K-30[edit]

K-30
LocationMaple Hill
Length1.950 mi[1] (3.138 km)
Existed1950–

K-30 is a 1.950-mile-long (3.138 km) spur route that serves the city of Maple Hill in northeastern Wabaunsee County.[1][2]

Browse numbered routes
K-28K-31

K-41[edit]

K-41
LocationDelphos
Length4.960 mi[1] (7.982 km)
Existed1938–

K-41 is a 4.960-mile-long (7.982 km) spur route that serves the city of Delphos in north central Ottawa County.[1][2]

Browse numbered routes
K-39K-42

K-46[edit]

K-46
LocationLittle River
Length1.315 mi[1] (2.116 km)
Existed1937–2013

K-46 was a 1.315-mile (2.116 km) north–south spur of US-56 that served the town of Little River. K-46 first appeared on the 1937 Kansas highway map.[3] It was removed from the highway system on June 3, 2013.[4]

Browse numbered routes
K-44K-47

K-67[edit]

K-67
LocationNorton
Length0.972 mi[1] (1.564 km)
Existed1938–

K-67 is a 0.972-mile-long (1.564 km) spur route that serves the Kansas Department of Corrections Norton Correctional Facility east of Norton in central Norton County.[1][2] The highway begins at US-36 and K-383, which run concurrently east–west, and immediately has a grade crossing of the Kyle Railroad. K-67 passes along the east side of the state prison and crosses Prairie Dog Creek before reaching its northern terminus at the next section line road.[2] K-67 has existed since at least January 1938.[5] Before K-67 provided access to Norton Correctional Facility, the highway served Norton State Hospital on the same site. The state hospital closed in 1988.[6]

Browse numbered routes
K-66K-68

K-71[edit]

K-71
LocationBern
Length4.581 mi[1] (7.372 km)

K-71 is a 4.581-mile-long (7.372 km) spur route that serves the city of Bern in north central Nemaha County.[1][2] The route begins at an intersection with K-63 and heads east to Bern, where it ends at an intersection with 216th Road and Matthews Avenue.

Browse numbered routes
I-70K-72

K-72[edit]

K-72
LocationBasehor
Existed1932–1973

K-72 was a spur route that served the city of Basehor. The highway began at US-24 and US-40 and ran northward to the Basehor city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-72 from the state highway system in 1973 and it is now known as 155th Street.

Browse numbered routes
K-71US-73

K-76[edit]

K-76
LocationWilliamstown
Length0.325 mi[7] (0.523 km)
Existedc. 1951–2014

K-76 was a 0.325-mile-long (0.523 km) spur route that served the unincorporated village of Williamstown in southeastern Jefferson County. The highway began at Railroad Avenue just north of the Union Pacific Railroad. K-76 headed north along Oak Street to a four-way intersection with US-24 and US-59. From that intersection, US-24 headed west toward Perry, US-59 headed north toward Oskaloosa, and the two U.S. Highways headed southeast concurrently toward Lawrence.[7][8] K-76 has existed since before 1951, when the Kansas State Highway Department approved a relocation of US-24 on the north side of Williamstown through a May 23, 1951, resolution. This project moved the US-24–US-59–K-76 intersection south, and US-59 took over the northern part of K-76's course.[9] The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-76 from the state highway system through a January 3, 2014, resolution.[7]

Browse numbered routes
US-75US-77

K-78[edit]

K-78
LocationMiller
Length1.057 mi[1] (1.701 km)
Existedc. 1938

K-78 is a 1.057-mile-long (1.701 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Miller in northeastern Lyon County.[1][2] The highway begins at a junction of section line roads on the northern edge of the village. K-78 heads north to its end at US-56 between Admire and Osage City.[2] A spur to Miller has been part of the state highway system since at 1936.[10] K-78 was assigned to the Miller spur by January 1938 at the latest.[11]

Browse numbered routes
US-77K-79

K-79[edit]

K-79
LocationCircleville
Length3.561 mi[1] (5.731 km)

K-79 is a 3.561-mile-long (5.731 km) spur route that serves the city of Circleville in north central Jackson County.[1][2] The route begins at an intersection with K-16 and heads north to Circleville, where it ends at an intersection with 254th Road and K Road.

Browse numbered routes
K-78K-80

K-80[edit]

K-80
LocationMorganville
Length3.816 mi[1] (6.141 km)

K-80 is a 3.816-mile-long (6.141 km) spur route that serves the city of Morganville in north central Clay County.[1][2] The route begins at an intersection with Jayhawk Road and Allen Street, where it heads east and ends at an intersection with K-15.

Browse numbered routes
K-79US-81

K-84[edit]

K-84
LocationPenokee
Length0.881 mi[1] (1.418 km)
Existedc. 1938

K-84 is a 0.881-mile-long (1.418 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Penokee in west central Graham County.[1][2] The highway begins just north of Railroad Avenue in the village, from which the road continues south as 4th Street. K-84 crosses the South Fork Solomon River on its way to its northern terminus at US-24 between Hoxie and Hill City.[2] The main east–west highway of Graham County crossed the South Fork Solomon River at Penokee on its course between Morland and Hill City in 1918.[12] However, by 1932, that highway followed US-24's present course, and a spur route may have been in place south to Penokee.[13] K-84 was assigned to the Penokee spur by January 1938 at the latest.[11]

Browse numbered routes
US-83K-85

K-85[edit]

K-85
LocationMorland
Length0.800 mi[1] (1.287 km)
Existedc. 1938

K-85 is a 0.800-mile-long (1.287 km) spur route that serves the city of Morland in west central Graham County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit north of Solomon Street; the road continues as 5th Street. K-85 crosses the South Fork Solomon River on its way to its northern terminus at US-24 between Hoxie and Hill City.[14] The main east–west highway of Graham County followed the south side of the South Fork Solomon River at Morland on its course between Hoxie and the village of Penokee in 1918.[12] However, by 1932, that highway followed US-24's present course, and a spur route may have been in place south to Morland.[13] K-85 was assigned to the Morland spur by January 1938 at the latest.[11]

Browse numbered routes
K-84K-86

K-88[edit]

K-88
LocationVermillion
Length0.466 mi[1] (0.750 km)
Existed1935–

K-88, also known as 29th Terrace, is a short 0.466-mile-long (0.750 km) state highway located entirely within Marshall County in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-88's southern terminus is at the end of state maintenance at the Vermillion city limits, where it continues as 29th Terrace. The northern terminus is at K-9 north of the City of Vermillion.

The entire route is in Marshall County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Vermillion0.0000.00029th TerraceSouthern terminus; continues south as 29th Terrace
Noble Township0.4660.750 K-9 (Sunflower Road) – Frankfort, CentraliaNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-87K-89

K-89[edit]

K-89
LocationHalstead
Length1.514 mi[1] (2.437 km)
Existed1932–
Hertzler Memorial Highway sign at the south end of K-89

K-89 is a 1.514-mile-long (2.437 km) spur route that serves the city of Halstead in central Harvey County.[1][2] The highway begins at a flood gate at the south end of the highway's bridge across the Little Arkansas River at the north city limit.[15] The road continues south as Main Street, which contains a variety of historic sites, including its post office, museum and former railroad station, a pair of historic homes, and the Bernhard Warkentin Homestead, which is a National Historic Landmark. K-89 heads north by Riverside Park—the site of the Old Settlers Picnic and of filming for the 1955 movie Picnic[16]—along Hertzler Memorial Highway, which honors "Horse and Buggy Doctor" Arthur E. Hertzler.[17] The highway passes through an S-curve to veer east onto a section line road, which the highway follows to its end at US-50 between Burrton and Newton.[18] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a purchase order for right of way to construct K-89 on September 13, 1932.[19] The highway was built in the second half of 1934 as an improved dirt road that was partially funded by national recovery grants.[20] However, before the state had paved the highway, the commission decided to eliminate several sharp curves in the highway's planned course and return the unused land to the former property owners in a November 15, 1935, resolution.[19] K-89 was paved on its present course by 1936.[10]

Browse numbered routes
K-88K-90

K-90[edit]

K-90
LocationLeavenworth State Fishing Lake
Length2.180 mi[21] (3.508 km)
Existed1936–1997

K-90 was a 2.180-mile-long (3.508 km) spur route that served Leavenworth State Fishing Lake. The highway began at Leavenworth State Fishing Lake and ran eastward to K-16 northwest of the city of Tonganoxie. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-90 from the state highway system in a December 9, 1997 resolution.[21]

Browse numbered routes
K-89K-92

K-94[edit]

K-94
LocationClark County State LakeKingsdown
Length10.780 mi[1] (17.349 km)
Existed1936–

K-94 is a state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. The highway runs 10.780 miles (17.349 km) from Clark County State Lake north to US-54 in Kingsdown.


CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Clark0.0000.000Clark County State LakeSouthern terminus
FordKingsdown10.78017.349 US-54Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-93K-95

K-97[edit]

K-97
LocationSheridan State Game management area
Existed1941–1957

K-97 was a spur route that served the Sheridan State Game management area in Sheridan County. The highway began at US-40 and ran northward to the Sheridan State Game management area. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-97 in 1941 and removed it from the state highway system in a 1957 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-96K-98

K-100[edit]

K-100
LocationTopeka
Existed1957–1978

K-100 was a short spur route in the city of Topeka in Shawnee County. The highway began at I-70, US-40 and K-4 at exit 357A of I-70 and ran northward to a dead end. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-100 in 1957 and removed it from the state highway system in 1978. The road is now known as SW Fairlawn Road.

Browse numbered routes
K-99K-101

K-102[edit]

K-102
LocationWest MineralScammon
Length5.004 mi[1] (8.053 km)
Existed1940–

K-102 is a 5.004-mile-long (8.053 km) spur route that serves the city of West Mineral in Cherokee County. K-102's western terminus is in West Mineral where it continues as Richardson Avenue and the eastern terminus is at K-7 in the City of Scammon.

The entire route is in Cherokee County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
West Mineral0.0000.000Richardson AvenueWestern terminus; continues as Richardson Avenue
Scammon5.0048.053 K-7Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-101K-103

K-105[edit]

K-105
LocationToronto State Park
Length10.425 mi[1] (16.777 km)
Existed1941–


K-105 is a 10.425-mile-long (16.777 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-105's southern terminus is at Carlisle Road in Toronto State Park and the northern terminus is at US-54 north of Toronto.

The entire route is in Woodson County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Toronto State Park0.0000.000Carlisle RoadSouthern terminus
Town of Toronto10.42516.777 US-54Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-104K-106

K-110[edit]

K-110
LocationAxtell
Length1.760 mi[1] (2.832 km)
Existed1941–

K-110 is a 1.760-mile-long (2.832 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-110's southern terminus is at US-36 south of Axtell, and the northern terminus is a continuation as State Street at the Axtell City limits.

The entire route is in Marshall County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Murray Township0.0000.000 US-36Southern terminus
Axtell1.7602.832State StreetContinuation as State Street at Axtell City limits
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-108K-111

K-112[edit]

K-112
LocationEsbon
Length2.483 mi[1] (3.996 km)
Existed1950–

K-112 is a 2.483-mile-long (3.996 km) spur route that serves the city of Esbon in Jewell County. K-112's southern terminus is at U.S. Route 36 (US-36) and the northern terminus is a continuation as Grand Avenue at the Esbon city limits.

The entire route is in Jewell County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Esbon Township0.0000.000 US-36Southern terminus
Esbon2.4833.996Grand AvenueContinuation as Grand Avenue at Esbon City limits
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-111K-113

K-114[edit]

K-114
LocationOgden
Length0.90 mi[22] (1.4 km)
Existed1977–

K-114 is a 0.9-mile-long (1.4 km) spur route that serves the city of Ogden in southwestern Riley County.[22] The highway begins at the east city limit of Ogden; the road continues southwest as Riley Street. The highway curves southeast as a four-lane divided highway, crosses a Union Pacific rail line, and reaches its eastern terminus at a partial cloverleaf interchange with K-18, a four-lane freeway that heads northeast toward Manhattan and southwest toward I-70 and Junction City.[22][23][2] K-114 was proposed as part of a May 9, 1973, Kansas State Highway Commission resolution to remove K-18 from its course through Fort Riley in favor of a route around the military base between Ogden and Junction City to separate military traffic and regular highway traffic. K-18 would be placed on its present corridor from just east of Ogden south to I-70, and the piece of K-18 between the city of Ogden and the new portion of K-18 would become K-114.[24] The junction of K-18 and K-114 would be a partial interchange featuring a flyover ramp for westbound K-18 and no access from K-114 to westbound K-18 or from eastbound K-18 to K-114.[23][24] K-114 was established when construction on the K-18 link between Ogden and I-70 was completed between 1975 and 1977.[25][26] Between 2010 and 2013, K-18 and K-114 were relocated and their present interchange was constructed.[27][28]

K-114 (1950–1966)[edit]

K-114
LocationEverest
Length0.376 mi[29] (0.605 km)
Existed1950–1966

K-114 was a 0.376-mile-long (0.605 km) spur route that served the city of Everest in southeastern Brown County.[29][30] The highway began at US-73 and K-20, which ran concurrently east–west, between Horton to the west and Huron and Denton to the east. K-114 headed north to the south city limit of Everest, from which the road continued north as Fifth Street.[30][31] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-114 into the state highway system through a July 12, 1950, resolution.[29] The commission authorized relocations of US-73 and K-20 in and around Everest through an August 12, 1964, resolution. The eastern end of K-20's concurrency with US-73 had been southeast of Everest. The state-numbered highway would be relocated to pass through Everest, assume the course of K-114, and reach its new US-73 junction at what was K-114's southern terminus.[32] K-114 was replaced by K-20 when the relocations were completed in 1966.[33][34]

K-115[edit]

K-115
LocationPalmer
Length0.650 mi[1] (1.046 km)
Existed1946–

K-115 is a 0.650-mile-long (1.046 km) spur route that serves the city of Palmer in south central Washington County.[1][2] The highway begins at Pennsylvania Avenue just west of the east city limit at Peats Creek. K-115 heads east along Palmer Avenue to K-9 and K-15, which run concurrently north–south, between Clay Center and Linn.[35] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-115 into the state highway system from Washington County through an April 10, 1946, resolution.[36]

K-119[edit]

K-119
LocationGreenleaf
Length0.761 mi[1] (1.225 km)
Existed1947–

K-119 is a 0.761-mile-long (1.225 km) spur route that serves the city of Greenleaf in east central Washington County.[1][2] The highway begins at K-9 and K-148, which run concurrently east–west, between Linn and Barnes. K-119 heads north to the south city limit of Greenleaf at 8th Street, from which the road continues north as Main Street.[37] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-119 into the state highway system from Washington County through an October 8, 1947, resolution.[38]

K-121[edit]

K-121
LocationStuttgart
Length0.451 mi[39] (0.726 km)
Existed1954–2014

K-121 was a 0.451-mile-long (0.726 km) spur route that served the city of Stuttgart in Phillips County. The highway began at US-36 and ran eastward to the Stuttgart city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-121 from the state highway system in a May 1, 2014 resolution.[39]

Browse numbered routes
K-120K-122

K-122[edit]

K-122
LocationPrairie View
Existed1952–1960

K-122 was a short spur route that served the city of Prairie View in Osage County. The highway began at US-36 west of Prairie View and ran eastward to the Prairie View city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-122 in 1952 and removed it from the state highway system in a 1960 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-121K-123

K-130[edit]

K-130
LocationHartford, Neosho Rapids
Length7.818 mi[1] (12.582 km)
Existed1951–

K-130 is a 7.818-mile-long (12.582 km) spur route that serves the cities of Hartford and Neosho Rapids in Lyon County. K-130's southern terminus is a continuation as Commercial Street at the Hartford City limits, and the northern terminus is at I-35 and US-50 north of the City of Neosho Rapids. K-130 was originally a section of K-57, but in 1951 K-57 was realigned furthur south.[40] The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began building the John Redmond Dam on June 18, 1959 and then in 1962 K-130 was realigned slightly between Hartford and to make room for the new reservoir. The dam went into service on November 17, 1964.[41][42]


CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
LyonHartford0.0000.000Commercial StreetSouthern terminus; continuation as Commercial Street at Hartford City limits
Coffey
No major junctions
LyonJackson Township7.81812.582 I-35 / US-50 – Wichita, Kansas CityNorthern terminus; diamond interchange; I-35 exit 141
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-129K-131

K-131[edit]

K-131
LocationLebo
Length0.521 mi[1] (0.838 km)
Existed1949–

K-131 is a 0.521-mile-long (0.838 km) spur route that serves the city of Lebo in northwestern Coffey County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit between Sixth and Seventh streets, from which the road continues south as Ogden Street. K-131 heads north to a diamond interchange with I-35 and US-50, which run concurrently east–west, between Emporia and Ottawa.[43] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-131 into the state highway system from Coffey County through an August 24, 1949, resolution.[44] The section of highway began at US-50S south of the city and went north 0.560 miles (0.901 km) to Sac and Fox Street and Ogden Street at the south city limit of Lebo.[44][45] This highway is now named Old Highway 131.[43] On November 14, 1968, the Kansas State Highway Commission approved a lengthy resolution adding and removing several designations in Lyon, Coffey, Osage, and Franklin counties as part of plans to construct I-35 between Emporia and Ottawa. The resolution removed US-50 from its old course and placed it on I-35, and it also changed K-131's route from its southern approach to Lebo to its current northern approach.[45] The change in routing in K-131 and the other highways went into effect in 1973 when I-35 was completed from east of Emporia to Ottawa.[46][47]

Browse numbered routes
K-130K-132

K-133[edit]

K-133
LocationDennis
Length0.491 mi[48] (0.790 km)
Existed1954–1995

K-133 was a 0.491-mile-long (0.790 km) spur route that served the city of Dennis in Labette County. The highway began at US-160 and ran northward to the Dennis city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-133 from the state highway system in a May 3, 1995 resolution.[48]

Browse numbered routes
K-132K-134

K-134[edit]

K-134
LocationBartlett
Length0.231 mi[49] (0.372 km)
Existed1954–2000

K-134 was a 0.231-mile-long (0.372 km) spur route that served the city of Bartlett in Labette County. The highway began at US-166 and K-134 and ran northward to the Bartlett city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-134 from the state highway system in a December 5, 2000 resolution.[49]

Browse numbered routes
K-133I-135

K-136[edit]

K-136
LocationTroy
Length0.400 mi[1] (0.644 km)
Existed2004–

K-136 is a 0.400-mile-long (0.644 km) spur route that serves the city of Troy in Doniphan County. K-136's southern terminus is at the Troy city line and the northern terminus is at US-36 north of Troy.

K-137[edit]

K-137
LocationPurcell
Length0.250 mi[1] (0.402 km)
Existed1952–

K-137 is a 0.250-mile-long (0.402 km) spur route that serves the community of Purcell in Doniphan County. K-137's southern terminus is at the Purcell city line and the northern terminus is at K-20 north of Purcell.

K-138[edit]

K-138
LocationPaxico
Length1.086 mi[1] (1.748 km)
Existed1952–

K-138 is a 1.086-mile-long (1.748 km) spur route that serves the city of Paxico in central Wabaunsee County.[1][2] The highway begins at a partial cloverleaf interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Alma and Maple Hill. K-138 heads east and gradually approaches a Union Pacific Railroad line and then closely parallels the line to the west city limit of Paxico at Newbury Avenue.[50] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized K-10, which at the time extended west of Lawrence, to be relocated to a new two-lane road between K-99 north of Alma and Maple Hill through an October 29, 1940, resolution.[51] This new highway bypassed K-10's old course west from Paxico when it was completed between 1941 and 1945.[51][52][53] The commission accepted K-138 into the state highway system from Wabaunsee County through an October 8, 1952, resolution.[54] K-138 followed K-10's old course for 1.259 miles (2.026 km) between an oblique intersection on a tangent with the contemporary course of K-10 and the city limit of Paxico.[51][54] K-10 near Paxico was replaced by US-40 between 1953 and 1956.[55][56] K-138 was put on its present course when it was relocated at its west end to tie into the I-70 interchange when US-40 was upgraded to the Interstate Highway in 1961.[57][58]

K-139[edit]

K-139
LocationCuba
Length1.000 mi[1] (1.609 km)
Existed1954–

K-139 is a 1.000-mile-long (1.609 km) spur route that serves the city of Cuba in Republic County. K-139's southern terminus is at Linden Street in Cuba and the northern terminus is at US-36 north of Cuba.

K-157[edit]

K-157
LocationLyon Township
Length3.866 mi[1] (6.222 km)
Existed1950–

K-157 is a 3.866-mile-long (6.222 km) spur route in Lyon Township in southwestern Geary County that serves Rock Springs 4-H Center, a 4-H camp that lies in both Geary and Dickinson counties.[1][2] The highway begins at the main entrance of Rock Springs 4-H Center just north of the Geary–Dickinson county line. K-157 heads north to the next section line road, then the route curves east and follows the section line road to its eastern terminus at US-77 between Junction City and Herington.[2] The Kansas State Highway Commission proposed a state highway connection between US-77 and Rock Springs 4-H Camp in a May 24, 1950, resolution, and the commission confirmed their decision in a November 14, 1950, resolution. The highway used the north–south segment of modern K-157, but instead of heading east toward modern US-77 north of the camp, the highway headed west to the contemporary course of US-77.[59] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-77 between Herington and Junction City in a January 6, 1960, resolution. The resolution included designation of a new course for K-157 from north of the 4-H facility to connect with the new course of US-77 and to remove the connection to old US-77.[60] K-157 was assigned to its present course after US-77's relocation was completed in 1961.[57][58]

Browse numbered routes
K-156K-158

K-162[edit]

K-162
LocationProtection
Existed1963–1977

K-162 was a short spur route that served the city of Protection in Comanche County. The highway began at US-160 and US-183 ran northward to the Protection city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-162 from the state highway system in a 1977 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-161K-163

K-163[edit]

K-163
LocationGarden Plain
Length0.485 mi[61] (0.781 km)
Existed1966–2013

K-163 was a 0.485-mile-long (0.781 km) spur route that served the city of Garden Plain in Sedgwick County. The highway began at the Garden Plain city limits and ran northward to US-54. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-163 from the state highway system in a June 1, 2013 resolution.[61]

Browse numbered routes
K-162K-164

K-164[edit]

K-164
LocationValley Center
Existed1967–1985

K-164 was a short spur route that served the city of Valley Center in Sedgwick County. The highway began at North Broadway in Valley Center and ran eastward to I-135, US-81 and K-15. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-164 from the state highway system in a 1985 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-163K-165

K-165[edit]

K-165
LocationHesston
Existed1967–1985

K-165 was a short spur route that served the city of Hesston in Harvey County. The highway began at the Hesston city limits and ran northward to I-135 and US-81 north of Hesston. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-165 from the state highway system in a 1985 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-164US-166

K-167[edit]

K-167
LocationMarienthal
Length0.506 mi[1] (0.814 km)
Existed1958–

K-167 is a 0.506-mile-long (0.814 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Marienthal in east central Wichita County.[1][2] The highway begins at K-96 between Leoti and Scott City. K-167 heads north through a grade crossing of the Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad and terminates at the north end of the village at a county highway equidistant between K-96 and the section line road to the north.[2] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-167 into the state highway system from Wichita County through an August 27, 1958, certification of a September 25, 1957, resolution.[62]

Browse numbered routes
US-166K-168

K-168[edit]

K-168
LocationLehigh
Length0.527 mi[1] (0.848 km)
Existed1970–

K-168 is a 0.527-mile-long (0.848 km) spur route that serves the city of Lehigh in west central Marion County.[1][2] The highway begins at US-56 and K-15, which run concurrently east–west, between Canton and Hillsboro. K-168 heads north to the south city limit of Lehigh at Main Street, from which the road continues north as Old K56 Road.[63] K-168 was constructed as part of US-56, which in 1969 passed along the west city limit of Lehigh and intersected K-15 at what is now K-168's southern terminus.[64] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized a relocation of US-56 to its current course near Lehigh in a March 26, 1969, resolution. As part of the resolution, the portion of bypassed US-56 south of Main Street in Lehigh would be redesignated K-168.[65] The US-56 relocation was completed and K-168 was assigned to its present course in 1970.[66][67]

Browse numbered routes
K-167US-169

K-171 (1958–2010)[edit]

K-171
LocationBushton
Existed1958–2010

K-171 was a short spur route that served the city of Bushton in Rice County. The highway began at the Bushton city limits and ran northward to K-4 north of Bushton. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-171 from the state highway system in a 2010 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-170K-171

K-172[edit]

K-172
LocationTopeka
Existed1957–1978

K-172 was a short spur route in the city of Topeka in Shawnee County. The highway began at the Kansas Youth Center and ran eastward to US-40, US-75 Alt. and K-4, which ran concurrent at the time of decommissioning but is now just US-24. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-172 in 1957 and removed it from the state highway system in 1978. The road is now known as NW 25th Street.

Browse numbered routes
K-171K-173

K-173[edit]

K-173
LocationDensmore
Length0.650 mi[1] (1.046 km)
Existed1956–

K-173 is a 0.650-mile-long (1.046 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Densmore in southeastern Norton County.[1][2] The highway begins at an intersection of section line roads in the village. K-173 heads north to its end at K-9 between Edmond and Logan.[2] The village of Densmore had been served directly by K-9 until that highway was relocated to its present course between Edmond and Logan between 1946 and 1948.[68][69] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-173 into the state highway system from Norton County through a May 23, 1956, certification of March 13, 1956, resolution that recognized the need to restore state highway access to the village of Densmore.[70]

Browse numbered routes
K-172K-174

K-174[edit]

K-174
LocationMelvern
Existed1956–1968

K-174 was a short spur route that served the city of Melvern in Osage County. The highway began at US-75 and K-31 west of Melvern and ran eastward to the Melvern city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-174 in 1956 and removed it from the state highway system in a 1968 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-173K-175

K-175[edit]

K-175
LocationMarquette
Length0.500 mi[71] (0.805 km)
Existed1956–2013

K-175 was a 0.500-mile-long (0.805 km) spur route that served the city of Marquette in northwestern McPherson County.[71][72] The highway began at an abandoned railroad grade at the north city limit of Marquette. The road continued south as Swedonia Street into the city, which contains the Hans Hanson House and the Kansas Motorcycle Museum. K-175 headed north from the city limit to its end at K-4 between Geneseo and Lindsborg.[73] The Kansas State Highway Commission established the highway through a June 13, 1956, resolution to restore state highway access to Marquette removed when K-4 was relocated to bypass the city between 1953 and 1956.[74][75] The Kansas Department of Transportation acted to remove K-175 from the state highway system in a September 9, 2009, resolution that mainly concerned relocating several segments of K-61.[71] The removal was effective at the conclusion of "turnback work" to resurface the highway in 2013.[76]

Browse numbered routes
K-174K-176

K-176[edit]

K-176
LocationLucas

K-176 was a spur route that served the city of Lucas in Russell County. The highway began at the Lucas city limits and ran northward to K-18. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-176 from the state highway system in 2006.[77]

Browse numbered routes
K-175US-177

K-178[edit]

K-178
LocationSt. Benedict
Length3.513 mi[1] (5.654 km)
Existed1957–

K-178 is a 3.513-mile-long (5.654 km) spur route that serves the community of St. Benedict in Nemaha County. K-178's southern terminus is at US-36 west of the city of Seneca and the northern terminus is a continuation as 176th Street at Main Street in St. Benedict.

Browse numbered routes
K-177K-179

K-180[edit]

K-180
LocationAlta Vista
Length0.307 mi[78] (0.494 km)
Existed1956–2001

K-180 was a 0.307-mile-long (0.494 km) spur route that served the city of Alta Vista in Wabaunsee County. The highway began at K-4 south of Alta Vista and ran northward to the Alta Vista city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-180 from the state highway system in a December 19, 2001 resolution.[78]

Browse numbered routes
K-179K-181

K-182[edit]

K-182
LocationBellaire
Length0.914 mi[1] (1.471 km)
Existed1955–

K-182 is a 0.914-mile-long (1.471 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Bellaire in east central Smith County.[1][2] The highway begins at US-36 between Smith Center and Lebanon. K-182 heads north and ends at the grade crossing with the Kyle Railroad in the village of Bellaire.[2] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-182 into the state highway system from Smith County through a November 23, 1955, resolution.[79]

Browse numbered routes
K-181US-183

K-184[edit]

K-184
LocationBrewster
Length1.578 mi[1] (2.540 km)
Existed1955–

K-184 is a 1.578-mile-long (2.540 km) spur route that serves the city of Brewster in Thomas County. K-184's southern terminus is at I-70 and US-24 and the northern terminus is at the Brewster city limits .

Browse numbered routes
US-183K-185

K-185[edit]

K-185
LocationMcFarland
Length0.650 mi[1] (1.046 km)
Existed1955–

K-185 is a 0.650-mile-long (1.046 km) spur route that serves the city of McFarland in north central Wabaunsee County.[1][2] The highway begins at a section line road within an S-curve at the north city limit, from which the road continues southeast as Main Street. K-185 heads north to its end at a partial cloverleaf interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Alma and Maple Hill.[80] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-185 into the state highway system from Wabaunsee County through a May 25, 1955, resolution. K-185's northern terminus was originally at K-10, which at the time extended west of Lawrence.[81] The commission had authorized K-10 to be relocated to a new two-lane road between K-99 north of Alma and Maple Hill through an October 29, 1940, resolution.[51] This new highway bypassed K-10's old course through McFarland when it was completed between 1941 and 1945.[51][52][53] K-10 near McFarland was replaced by US-40 in 1956.[81][56] The highway was then upgraded to I-70 in 1961.[57][58]

Browse numbered routes
K-184K-186

K-186[edit]

K-186
LocationMenlo
Length1.600 mi[1] (2.575 km)
Existed1955–

K-186 is a 1.600-mile-long (2.575 km) spur route that serves the city of Menlo in Thomas County. K-184's southern terminus is at G Avenue in Menlo and the northern terminus is at US-24 north of Menlo.

Browse numbered routes
K-185K-187

K-188[edit]

K-188
LocationSeguin
Length3.100 mi[1] (4.989 km)
Existed1956–

K-188 is a 3.100-mile-long (4.989 km) spur route that serves the community of Seguin in Sheridan County. K-188's southern terminus is at the Seguin line and the northern terminus is at US-24 north of Seguin.

Browse numbered routes
K-187K-189

K-189[edit]

K-189
LocationMiltonvale
Length0.915 mi[1] (1.473 km)

K-189 is a 0.915-mile-long (1.473 km) spur route that serves the city of Miltonvale in southeastern Cloud County.[1][2] The highway begins at the south end of East 3rd Street, which forms the east city limit. The road curves west into the city and becomes east–west Ash Avenue. K-189 heads north to its end at US-24 between Glasco and Clay Center.[82] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-24 from east of US-81 to Miltonvale through a November 24, 1954, resolution. The old routing of US-24 west of Miltonvale would be transferred to county control, and the portion of US-24 from Miltonvale north to the junction of the old and new courses would remain in the state highway system.[83] The US-24 relocation was completed and K-189 was assigned to the connector from US-24 to Miltonvale by 1956.[56]

Browse numbered routes
K-188K-190

K-191[edit]

K-191
LocationLebanon
Length0.999 mi[1] (1.608 km)
Existed1954–

K-191 is a 0.999-mile-long (1.608 km) spur route that serves the geographic center of the contiguous United States near Lebanon in east central Smith County.[1][2] The highway begins at a park with a monument to the site's geographic distinction at the junction of two section line roads. K-191 heads east to its end at US-281 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the north city limit of Lebanon.[84] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-191 into the state highway system from Smith County through a November 24, 1954, certification of an April 14, 1954, resolution to provide state resources to the ordinary section line road burdened with serving traffic to the geographic site.[85]

Browse numbered routes
K-190K-192

K-193[edit]

K-193
LocationAsherville
Length0.467 mi[1] (0.752 km)
Existed1954–

K-193 is a 0.467-mile-long (0.752 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Asherville in east central Mitchell County.[1][2] The highway begins at an intersection of section line roads in the village. K-193 heads north to its end at US-24 between Beloit and Glasco.[2] The village of Densmore had been served directly by US-24 until that highway was relocated to its present course from west of Asherville to the Mitchell–Cloud county line between 1952 and 1954.[86] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved retaining a section of bypassed US-24 as a new spur route designated K-193 to retain state highway access to the village through a March 24, 1954, resolution.[87]

Browse numbered routes
K-192K-194

K-194[edit]

K-194
LocationSimpson
Length1.580 mi[1] (2.543 km)
Existed1954–

K-194 is a 1.580-mile-long (2.543 km) spur route that serves the city of Simpson, which lies in east central Mitchell County on the west side of the Mitchell–Cloud county line.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit at the Kyle Railroad and Front Street, from which the road continues south as Mill Street. K-194 heads north along the county line to its end at US-24 between Beloit and Glasco.[88] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-24 from the Mitchell–Cloud county line east to Glasco through a June 25, 1952, resolution. The portion of US-24 through Simpson, which followed the length of the road along the county line between US-24 and the railroad, would be removed from the state highway system.[89] After the US-24 relocation was completed by early 1954, the commission decided to restore state highway access to Simpson along the former course of US-24 through a March 24, 1954, resolution.[90] The spur to Simpson was designated K-194 between then and 1956.[90][56]

Browse numbered routes
K-193K-195

K-195[edit]

K-195
LocationHarveyville
Length0.370 mi[1] (0.595 km)
Existed1954–

K-195 is a 0.370-mile-long (0.595 km) spur route that serves the city of Harveyville in Wabaunsee County. K-195's southern terminus is at K-31 south of Harveyville and the northern terminus is at Main Street in Harveyville.

Browse numbered routes
K-194K-196

K-197[edit]

K-197
LocationIndustry
Length2.000 mi[1] (3.219 km)
Existed1957–

K-197 is a 2.000-mile-long (3.219 km) spur route that serves the community of Industry in Clay County and Dickinson County. K-197's western terminus is at 1st Road in Industry and the eastern terminus is at K-15 east of Industry.

Browse numbered routes
K-196K-198

K-198[edit]

K-198
LocationCollyer
Length0.811 mi[1] (1.305 km)
Existed1960–

K-198 is a 0.811-mile-long (1.305 km) spur route that serves the city of Collyer in northwestern Trego County.[1][2] The highway begins at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Quinter and WaKeeney. K-198 heads north to the next section line road, then the route turns west to its end at Ainslie Street at the south city limit of Collyer, from which the road continues west as Eighth Street.[91] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized the construction of I-70, the relocation of US-40 onto I-70, and the removal of old US-40 from the state highway system between Collyer and Ogallah via WaKeeney in a February 26, 1958, resolution. That resolution retained the portion of US-40 at Collyer along what is now K-198 and added a north–south connector from old US-40 to I-70.[92] I-70 was completed between Collyer and Ogallah and K-198 was applied to I-70's connector to Collyer by 1960.[93]

Browse numbered routes
K-197K-199

K-199[edit]

K-199
LocationCourtland
Length0.832 mi[1] (1.339 km)
Existed1962–

K-199 is a 0.832-mile-long (1.339 km) spur route that serves the city of Courtland in west central Republic County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit, from which the road continues south as Main Street. K-199 heads north to its end at US-36 between Mankato and Scandia.[94] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a US-36 bypass from west of Formoso in Jewell County east to US-36's present junction with K-199 through a March 28, 1958, resolution. US-36 from the Courtland north city limit to K-199's present northern terminus would be retained as a state highway.[95] K-199 was assigned to the spur route to Courtland after the US-36 project was completed in 1962.[58][96]

Browse numbered routes
K-198K-201

K-201[edit]

K-201
LocationStark
Length0.786 mi[97] (1.265 km)
Existed1958–2013

K-201 was a 0.786-mile-long (1.265 km) spur route that served the city of Stark in Neosho County. The highway began at US-59 west of Stark and ran eastward to the Stark city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-201 from the state highway system in a June 3, 2013 resolution.[97]

Browse numbered routes
K-199K-202

K-202[edit]

K-202
LocationSavonburg
Length0.698 mi[98] (1.123 km)
Existed1958–2013

K-202 was a 0.698-mile-long (1.123 km) spur route that served the city of Savonburg in Allen County. The highway began at US-59 west of Savonburg and ran eastward to the Savonburg city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-202 in 1958 and removed it from the state highway system in a 2013 resolution.[98]

Browse numbered routes
K-201K-203

K-203[edit]

K-203
LocationElsmore
Length0.633 mi[99] (1.019 km)
Existed1958–2013

K-203 was a 0.633-mile-long (1.019 km) spur route that served the city of Elsmore in Allen County. The highway began at US-59 west of Elsmore and ran eastward to Main Street in Elsmore. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-203 from the state highway system in an October 11, 2013 resolution.[99]

Browse numbered routes
K-202K-204

K-205[edit]

K-205
LocationMilan
Length0.752 mi[100] (1.210 km)
Existed1959–2014

K-205 was a 0.752-mile-long (1.210 km) spur route that served the city of Milan in Sumner County. The highway began at the Milan city limits and ran northward to US-160. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-205 from the state highway system through a January 6, 2014, resolution.[100]

Browse numbered routes
K-204K-206

K-206[edit]

K-206
LocationChapman
Length0.932 mi (1.500 km)
Existed1958–2015

K-206 was a 0.932-mile-long (1.500 km) spur route that served the city of Chapman in Dickinson County. The highway began at the Chapman city limits and ran northward to I-70 and US-40 north of Chapman. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-206 from the state highway system in 2015.

Browse numbered routes
K-205K-207

K-209[edit]

K-209
LocationWoodbine
Length2.455 mi[1] (3.951 km)
Existed1961–

K-209 is a 2.455-mile-long (3.951 km) spur route that serves the city of Woodbine, which lies in east central Dickinson County on the west side of the Dickinson–Morris county line.[1][2] The highway begins at the northwest corner of the city at the intersection of Western Avenue and Eighth Street, which is also an intersection of orthogonal section line roads. K-209 follows the north city limit through a grade crossing with the heritage Abilene and Smoky Valley Railroad to the northeast corner of the city at Gillett Road. The highway crosses Lyon Creek, intersects Wolf Road, and curves away from and back to the east–west section line the route followed from Woodbine. At the east end of the curve, K-209 crosses the Dickinson–Morris county line, east of which the highway curves southeast to an orthogonal intersection with US-77 between Junction City and Herington.[101] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-77 between Herington and Junction City in a January 6, 1960, resolution. The old course of US-77 passed along the west and north sides of Woodbine, crossed Lyon Creek, and turned north onto Wolf Road toward Junction City. The resolution stated the old course of US-77 from the northwest corner of Woodbine to Wolf Road would remain in the state highway system, and a new road would be constructed east from Wolf Road to the new course of US-77.[60] Those two segments together became K-209 after US-77's relocation was completed in 1961.[57][58][60]

Browse numbered routes
K-208K-210

K-210[edit]

K-210
LocationArgonia
Length0.144 mi[100] (0.232 km)
Existed1959–2014

K-210 was a 0.144-mile-long (0.232 km) spur route that served the city of Argonia in Sumner County. The highway began at the Argonia city limits and ran northward to US-160. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-210 from the state highway system through a January 6, 2014 resolution.[100]

Browse numbered routes
K-209K-211

K-211[edit]

K-211
LocationPark
Length1.035 mi[1] (1.666 km)
Existed1959–

K-211 is a 1.035-mile-long (1.666 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-211's southern terminus is at I-70 and US-40 southwest of Park, and the northern terminus is at Old US-40 in Park.

The entire route is in Gove County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Payne Township0.0000.000 I-70 / US-40 – Hays, LimonSouthern terminus; diamond interchange; I-70 exit 99
Park1.0351.666Old US-40Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-210K-212

K-212[edit]

K-212
LocationQuinter
Length0.653 mi[102] (1.051 km)
Existed1959–2014

K-212 was a 0.653-mile-long (1.051 km) spur route that served the city of Quinter in Gove County. The highway began at I-70 south of Quinter and ran northward to Main Street in Quinter. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-212 from the state highway system in a April 4, 2014 resolution.[102]

Browse numbered routes
K-211K-214

K-215[edit]

K-215
LocationGoessel
Length0.488 mi[1] (0.785 km)
Existed1951–

K-215 is a 0.488-mile-long (0.785 km) spur route that serves the city of Goessel in southwestern Marion County.[1][2] The highway begins at the east city limit at Elm Street, from which the road continues west as Main Street. K-215 passes to the south of the Mennonite Heritage Museum as it heads east to K-15 between Lehigh and Newton.[103] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-215 into the state highway system from Marion County through a September 14, 1951, resolution. The highway originally extended west 1 mile (1.6 km) from K-15 through the then-unincorporated village to the next section line road.[104] On May 28, 1952, the commission passed another resolution in response to the village incorporating since the previous resolution. Since Kansas law stated a state highway could only extend to the city limit of a municipality, the new resolution removed from the state highway system the portion of the highway within the new city limits of Goessel.[105]

Browse numbered routes
K-214K-216

K-216[edit]

K-216
LocationGrinnell
Length0.585 mi[1] (0.941 km)
Existed1962–

K-216 is a 0.585-mile-long (0.941 km) spur route that serves the city of Grinnell in northwestern Gove County.[1][2] The highway begins at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Colby and Grainfield. K-216 heads north to South 6th Street, onto which the highway turns west and ends at the south city limit of Grinnell just east of Adams Street.[106] The Kansas State Highway Commission established K-216 to retain state highway access to Grinnell as part of a September 12, 1962, resolution that authorized the construction of I-70 and the relocation of US-40 onto I-70 from US-40 east of Oakley to Grainfield.[107] I-70 between Oakley and Grainfield was constructed between 1962 and 1965, although K-216 may have been marked as early as 1963.[96][108]

Browse numbered routes
K-215K-217

K-217[edit]

K-217
LocationWheeler
Length0.500 mi[109] (0.805 km)
Existed1959–2014

K-217 was a 0.500-mile-long (0.805 km) spur route that served the city of Wheeler in Cheyenne County. The highway began at US-36 south of Wheeler and ran northward to County Route O in Wheeler. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-217 from the state highway system in a March 3, 2014 resolution.[109]

Browse numbered routes
K-216K-218

K-218[edit]

K-218
LocationHerington
Length1.773 mi[1] (2.853 km)
Existed1964–

K-218 is a 1.773-mile-long (2.853 km) spur route that serves the city of Herington in southeastern Dickinson County.[1][2] The highway begins at the west city limit just north of Walnut Street, which heads east toward downtown Herington. K-218 intersects a Union Pacific Railroad line and continues north to its end at K-4 between Hope and Latimer.[110] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-77 between Herington and Junction City in a January 6, 1960, resolution.[60] The old course of US-77 entered Herington from the south along what is now US-56 Business; turned east onto Trapp Street, north onto Broadway Street, and west onto Walnut Street; and left town by turning north onto what is now K-218.[60][110] The course of K-218 remained in the state highway system after US-77's relocation was completed in 1961.[57][58][60] K-218 was assigned to the old piece of US-77 between 1963 and 1965.[96][108]

Browse numbered routes
K-217K-219

K-219[edit]

K-219
LocationSeward
Length0.995 mi[111] (1.601 km)
Existed1950–2013

K-219 was a 0.995-mile-long (1.601 km) spur route that served the city of Seward in Stafford County. The highway began at K-19 south of Seward and ran northward to the Seward city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-219 in 1950 and removed it from the state highway system in a May 1, 2013 resolution.[111]

Browse numbered routes
K-218K-220

K-220[edit]

K-220
LocationNew Cambria
Existed1959–1973

K-220 was a short spur route that served the city of New Cambria in Saline County. The highway began at the New Cambria city limits and ran northward to exit 260 of I-70 and US-40 northeast of New Cambria. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-220 from the state highway system in a 1973 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-219K-221

K-221[edit]

K-221
LocationSolomon
Existed1959–2013

K-221 was a short spur route that served the city of Solomon in Dickinson County. The highway began at the Solomon city limits and ran northward to I-70 and US-40 north of Solomon. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-221 from the state highway system in a 2013 resolution. It is now known as North Poplar Street.

Browse numbered routes
K-220K-222

K-222 (1960–1962)[edit]

K-222
LocationArma
Length0.111 mi (0.179 km)
ExistedJune 8, 1960–February 14, 1962

K-222 was a 0.111-mile-long (0.179 km) spur route that served the city of Arma in Crawford County. The highway began at US-69 and ran eastward to the Arma city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-222 on June 8, 1960 and removed it from the state highway system in a February 14, 1962 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-221K-222

K-222 (1966–2000)[edit]

K-222
LocationMound Valley
Length0.399 mi[49] (0.642 km)
Existed1966–2000

K-222 was a 0.399-mile-long (0.642 km) spur route that served the city of Mound Valley in Labette County. The highway began at US-160 and ran northward to the Mound Valley city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-222 from the state highway system in a December 5, 2000 resolution.[49]

Browse numbered routes
K-222K-223

K-224[edit]

K-224
LocationHumboldt
Length1.039 mi[112] (1.672 km)
Existed1977–2013

K-224 was a 1.039-mile-long (1.672 km) spur route that served the city of Humboldt in Allen County. The highway began at the Humbolt city limits and ran eastward to US-169 east of Humboldt. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-224 in 1977 and removed it from the state highway system in an October 13, 2013 resolution.[112]

Browse numbered routes
K-223K-225

K-228[edit]

K-228
LocationIonia
Length0.400 mi[1] (0.644 km)
Existed1945–

K-228 is a 0.400-mile-long (644 m) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. Located entirely within Jewell County, K-228's western terminus is at K-128 west Ionia and the eastern terminus is a continuation as a locally maintained road at the Ionia city limits. K-228 is not included in the National Highway System,[113] a system of highways important to the nation's defense, economy, and mobility.[114] 2017 Annual average daily traffic (AADT) on K-228 was 70 vehicles per day.[115] K-228 was assigned by the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) on June 20, 1945.[116] K-128 originally ran directly north–south through Ionia until it was moved slightly westward to a new alignment in 1945 and at that time K-228 was created to link Ionia to the new alignment of K-128.[117][118][119]

The entire route is in Jewell County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Ionia Township0.0000.000 K-128Western terminus
Ionia0.4000.644Unnamed roadEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-227K-229

K-229[edit]

K-229
LocationHaven
Existed1960–1977

K-229 was a short spur route that served the city of Haven in Reno County. The highway began at the former K-96 alignment, now known as Switzer Road, northward to the Haven city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-229 from the state highway system through a 1977 resolution. K-229 was decommissioned when K-96 was rerouted to a new alignment.

Browse numbered routes
K-228K-230

K-230[edit]

K-230
LocationMount Hope
Existed1960–1995

K-230 was a short spur route that served the city of Mount Hope in Sedgwick County. The highway began at the Mount Hope city limits, where it continued as North Ohio Street, and ran northward to K-96. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-230 from the state highway system through a 1995 resolution and is now known as North 279th Street West. K-230 was a former section of K-96 before K-96 was rerouted to a new alignment.

Browse numbered routes
K-229K-231

K-231[edit]

K-231
LocationDorrance
Existed1961–2006

K-231 was a spur route that served the city of Dorrance in Russell County. The highway began at the Dorrance city limits and ran northward to I-70 and US-40 north of Dorrance. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-231 from the state highway system in 2006.[77]

Browse numbered routes
K-230K-232

K-233[edit]

K-233
LocationOketo
Length3.481 mi (5.602 km)
Existed1961–present

K-233, also known as Cherokee Road, is a 3.481-mile-long (5.602 km) state highway located entirely within Marshall County in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-233's western terminus is at US-77 in the community of Lone Elm, and the eastern terminus is a continuation as East Street at the Oketo city limits. Just before the eastern terminus the highway crosses the Big Blue River. The entire route is in Marshall County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Lone Elm0.0000.000 US-77 – Marysville, WymoreWestern terminus
Oketo3.4815.602East StreetEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-232K-234

K-234[edit]

K-234
LocationHanover
Length0.347 mi[1] (0.558 km)
Existed1962–

K-234 is a 0.347-mile-long (0.558 km) spur route that serves the city of Hanover in northeastern Washington County.[1][2] The highway begins at the east city limit at Highland Street, where the road continues west as North Street. K-234 heads east to K-148 between Barnes and the Nebraska state line.[120] K-234's course was constructed as part of a relocation of K-15E (now K-148) south of Hanover that the Kansas State Highway Commission approved November 18, 1940. K-15E would be removed from Zenith Road from US-36 to Hanover and instead placed on K-148's present course south of what is now K-234 and on K-234's course to enter Hanover from the east instead of the south.[121] This relocation was completed by 1945.[53] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized a relocation of K-15E north from Hanover on March 8, 1961. This relocation would move K-15E from K-234's present course and Shady Boulevard north from Hanover to K-148's present course.[122] K-234 was established after the K-15E relocation was completed in 1962.[58][96]

Browse numbered routes
K-233I-235

K-236[edit]

K-236
LocationOneida
Length1.535 mi[1] (2.470 km)
Existed1961–

K-236 is a 1.535-mile-long (2.470 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-236's southern terminus is at US-36 south of Oneida, and the northern terminus is a continuation as 5th Street at the Oneida city limits.

The entire route is in Nemaha County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Rock Creek Township0.0000.000 US-36Southern terminus
Oneida1.5352.4705th StreetNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
I-235K-237

K-237[edit]

K-237
LocationPerry Lake
Length3.351 mi (5.393 km)
Existed1961–

K-237 begins at an at-grade intersection with the US-24 expressway in rural Jefferson County, about four miles west of Perry. From that junction, the highway heads in a mostly due-north course until it reaches the entrance to Perry State Park. At that point, the K-237 designation ends, but the road continues along the western edge of Perry Lake, and eventually turns west as a county-maintained road that connects with K-4 on the north edge of Meriden.

Browse numbered routes
K-236K-238

K-238[edit]

K-238
LocationElwood
Length1.433 mi[1] (2.306 km)
Existed1962–

K-238 is a 1.433-mile-long (2.306 km) spur route in Elwood in east central Doniphan County.[1][2] The highway serves Rosecrans Memorial Airport, the joint civilian–military airport for St. Joseph, Missouri, which lies on the opposite side of the Missouri River from Elwood. The airport lies west of the river but is in the state of Missouri; the Kansas–Missouri border follows a chain of oxbow lakes. Traffic from St. Joseph must pass through Kansas and use K-238 to reach the city's airport. K-238 begins at a diamond interchange with US-36 in the city of Elwood between St. Joseph and Wathena. The highway heads north through an S-curve and intersects Roseport Road. K-238 continues north along the west city limit to its end at the Browning Bridge, which crosses the eponymous oxbow lake into Missouri at the south end of the airport.[123] The Missouri River and the state line followed the same meander path prior to the Missouri River basin floods of 1952, before which St. Joseph was connected to its airport on land via Missouri Supplemental Route OO.[124][125] The 1952 floods created a meander cutoff east of the airport, cutting St. Joseph off from its airport. By 1955, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a permanent cutoff channel east of the one caused by the floods.[124] In order to improve access to the airport, the Kansas State Highway Commission approved the designation and construction of K-238 from US-36, which then followed Roseport Road, north to the Browning Bridge at the state line in a July 12, 1961, resolution.[126] The highway was constructed and marked as K-238 in 1962.[58][96] US-36 was authorized to be moved to its present freeway in a July 31, 1980, resolution. The resolution also extended K-238 east from its southern terminus along old US-36 through Elwood to its partial cloverleaf interchange with the freeway just west of the U.S. Highway's bridge to St. Joseph.[127] K-238 was authorized to be placed on its present course and removed from Roseport Road through a March 25, 1993, resolution.[128] The diamond interchange at K-238's southern terminus was completed between 1995 and 1997.[129][130]

Browse numbered routes
K-237K-239

K-241[edit]

K-241
LocationEmpire Township
Existed1960–1991

K-241 was a short spur route that served Kanopolis Lake State Park in Ellsworth County. The highway began at Kanopolis Lake State Park and ran eastward to K-141 north of the city of Venango. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-241 from the state highway system through a 1991 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-239K-242

K-242[edit]

K-242
LocationPawnee Township
Existed1962–1984

K-242 was a short spur route that served Fort Larned National Historic Site in Pawnee County. The highway began at Fort Larned National Historic Site and ran northward to U.S. Route 156 (US-156). The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-242 from the state highway system through a 1984 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-241K-243

K-243[edit]

K-243
LocationHollenberg Pony Express Station
Length0.942 mi[1] (1.516 km)
Existed1962–

K-243 is a 0.942-mile-long (1.516 km) spur route that serves the Hollenberg Pony Express Station near Hanover in northeastern Washington County.[1][2] The highway begins at K-148 between Barnes and the Nebraska state line. K-243 heads east to Big Bear Road, a section line road that provides access to the Hollenberg Pony Express Station property, also known as the Cottonwood Pony Express Station and Hollenberg Ranch State Park.[120] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-243 into the state highway system from Washington County through a June 13, 1962, certification of an August 23, 1961, resolution. The commission based its actions on a law the Kansas Legislature passed in 1961 that permitted the commission to improve roads to historical sites.[131]

Browse numbered routes
K-242K-244

K-245[edit]

K-245
LocationMeriden
Length0.330 mi[7] (0.531 km)
Existed1961–2014

K-245 was a 0.330-mile-long (0.531 km) spur route that served the city of Meriden in Jefferson County. The highway began at K-4 south of Meriden and ran northward to Lull Street in Meriden. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-245 in 1961 and removed it from the state highway system in a January 3, 2014 resolution.[7]

Browse numbered routes
K-244K-246


K-246[edit]

K-246
LocationSabethaMorill
Length5.572 mi[1] (8.967 km)

K-246 is a 5.572-mile-long (8.967 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-246's western terminus is at US-75 in the City of Sabetha, and the northern terminus is a continuation as Roxanna Street at the Morill city limits.


CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
NemahaBrown
county line
Sabetha0.0000.000 US-75 (Acorn Road) – Holton, AuburnWestern terminus
BrownMorill5.5728.967Roxanna StreetEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-245K-247

K-247[edit]

K-247
LocationEllis
Length0.123 mi[1] (0.198 km)
Existed1964–

K-247 is a 0.123-mile-long (0.198 km) spur route that serves the city of Ellis in western Ellis County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit of Ellis at 3rd Street, from which the road continues south as Washington Street. K-247 heads north to its end at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between WaKeeney and Hays.[132] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized the construction of I-70, the relocation of US-40 onto I-70, and the removal of old US-40 from the state highway system between Ogallah to the west in Trego County and Hays in an August 14, 1963, resolution. That resolution included a connector with the proposed designation of K-247 between I-70 and Ellis to retain state access to the city that would be removed with the removal of the old route of US-40 from the state highway system.[133] I-70 was completed between Ogallah and Hays and Ogallah and K-247 was applied to I-70's connector to Ellis in 1964.[96][108]

Browse numbered routes
K-246K-248

K-248[edit]

K-248
LocationKensington
Length0.997 mi[1] (1.605 km)
Existed1962–

K-248 is a 0.997-mile-long (1.605 km) spur route that serves the city of Kensington in west central Smith County.[1][2] The highway begins at 180 Road, a section line road, a little east of that road's bridge over Cedar Creek as the west leg of a wye intersection between east–west 180 Road and the north–south road that is named Main Street within Kensington, whose city limits are a little to the north of the wye. K-248 intersects a Kyle Railroad–operated rail line in the center of town. The highway follows Main Street to its northern terminus at US-36 at the north city limits of Kensington. US-36 heads west toward Agra and east toward Athol.[134] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved a relocation of US-36 from east of Agra in far eastern Phillips County to Kensington through a March 7, 1962, resolution. All of the bypassed routing of US-36, which included the present route of K-248 through Kensington, was planned to returned to local control.[135] However, on October 24, 1962, the commission passed a resolution retaining the portion of old US-36 north of 180 Road.[136] K-248 was assigned to its course after the US-36 relocation was completed in 1962.[58][96]

Browse numbered routes
K-247K-249

K-251[edit]

K-251
LocationCheney Reservoir
Length3.671 mi[1] (5.908 km)
Existed1963–


K-251 is a 3.671-mile-long (5.908 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-251's southern terminus is at US-54 and US-400 north of Cheney, and the northern terminus is a continuation as County Route 556 (CR 556) by Cheney Reservoir.The northern sector of the highway is inside of Cheney State Park, as well as Morton Township. At the southern terminus is a Diamond interchange.[137]

The entire route is in Grand River Township, Sedgwick County.

mi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
0.0000.000 US-54 / US-400 – Kingman, WichitaSouthern terminus; diamond interchange
3.6715.908 CR-556Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-249K-252

K-252[edit]

K-252
LocationBeverly
Length0.453 mi[1] (0.729 km)
Existed1964–

K-252 is a 0.453-mile-long (0.729 km) spur route that serves the city of Beverly in east central Lincoln County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit of Beverly north of 3rd Street, from which the road continues south as Main Street. K-252 heads north to its end at K-18 between Lincoln and Tescott.[138] The Kansas State Highway Commission accepted K-252 into the state highway system from Lincoln County through a May 13, 1964, resolution.[139] The designation restored state highway access to Beverly after K-18 had been removed from Beverly after that highway was relocated between Lincoln and Beverly between 1958 and 1960.[93][140]

Browse numbered routes
K-251K-253

K-253[edit]

K-253
LocationEdson
Length0.674 mi[1] (1.085 km)
Existed1968–

K-253 is a 0.674-mile-long (1.085 km) spur route that serves the unincorporated village of Edson in east central Sherman County.[1][2] The highway begins at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-24, which run concurrently east–west, between Goodland and Brewster. K-253 heads north to Old U.S. Highway 24, where the highway ends east of the center of Edson.[2] The Kansas State Highway Commission established K-253 to retain state highway access to Edson in an August 10, 1966, resolution.[141] This access was not originally part of plans for the portion of I-70 between the Colorado state line and Levant in Thomas County, as US-24 would have been moved onto I-70 and the old course of US-24 would be removed from the state highway system; these plans had been approved in a June 7, 1966, resolution.[142] K-253 was marked after I-70 was completed from Goodland to Levant in 1968.[143][64]

Browse numbered routes
K-252K-254

K-255[edit]

K-255
LocationVictoria
Length1.195 mi[1] (1.923 km)
Existed1964–

K-255 is a 1.195-mile-long (1.923 km) spur route that serves the city of Victoria in eastern Ellis County.[1][2] The highway begins at the north city limit of Victoria just north of 13th Street, from which the road continues south as Cathedral Street. K-255 heads north to its end at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Hays and Topeka.

Browse numbered routes
K-254K-256

K-257[edit]

K-257
LocationGorham
Length0.932 mi[144] (1.500 km)
Existed1966–2006

K-257 was a 0.932-mile-long (1.500 km) spur route that served the city of Gorham in west central Russell County.[144][145] The highway began at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-40, which run concurrently east–west, between Hays and Russell. K-257 headed north its end at Carrie Street at the south city limit of Gorham, from which the road continued north as Clifford Street.[145][146] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized the construction of I-70, the relocation of US-40 onto I-70, and the removal of old US-40 from the state highway system from Hays to east of Russell in an May 13, 1964, resolution. That resolution included a connector between I-70 and Gorham to retain state access to the city that would be removed with the removal of the old route of US-40 from the state highway system.[144] K-257 was assigned to the Gorham connector after I-70 was completed through Russell County in 1966.[33][34] The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-257 from the state highway system through an August 24, 2006, resolution.[147]

Browse numbered routes
K-256K-258

K-258[edit]

K-258
LocationWebster Reservoir
Length3.902 mi[1] (6.280 km)

K-258 is a 3.902-mile-long (6.280 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-258's southern terminus is a continuation as 10th Terrace by Webster Reservoir, and the northern terminus is at US-24 west of Stockton.

The entire route is in Rooks County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Rush Township0.0000.00010th TerraceSouthern terminus
Belmont Township3.9026.280 US-24 – Hill City, StocktonNorthern terminus; partial diamond interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-257K-259

K-259[edit]

K-259
LocationOnaga
Length0.200 mi (0.322 km)
Existed1964–1991

K-259 was a 0.200-mile-long (0.322 km) spur route that served the city of Onaga in Pottawatomie County. The highway began at K-16 and ran northward to the Onaga city limits. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-259 from the state highway system through a 1991 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-258K-260

K-261[edit]

K-261
LocationPrairie Dog State Park
Length1.201 mi (1.933 km)

K-261 is a 1.201-mile-long (1.933 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-261's southern terminus is at Prairie Dog State Park, and the northern terminus is at US-36 and K-383 west of Norton.

The entire route is in Norton County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Prairie Dog State Park0.0000.000Prairie Dog State ParkSouthern terminus
GarfieldCenter
township line
1.2011.933 US-36 / K-383Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-260K-263

K-263[edit]

K-263
LocationPaola
Length0.642 mi[148] (1.033 km)
Existed1969–1997

K-263 was a 0.642-mile-long (1.033 km) spur route that served the city of Paola in Jefferson County. The highway began at the Paola city limits and ran eastward to US-169 and K-7 east of Paola. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-263 in 1969 and removed it from the state highway system in a November 4, 1997 resolution.[148]

Browse numbered routes
K-261K-264

K-264[edit]

K-264
LocationLarned
Length1.033 mi[1] (1.662 km)
Existedc. 1965

K-264 is a 1.033-mile-long (1.662 km) spur route that serves Larned State Hospital west of Larned in central Pawnee County.[1][2] The highway begins at a T-intersection northwest of the psychiatric hospital within the state complex, which also includes the Larned Correctional Mental Health Facility and the Larned Juvenile Correctional Facility of the Kansas Department of Corrections. K-264 heads north out of the state reservation through an S-curve to its north end at K-156 between Larned and Burdett.[2] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized constructing K-264 through an August 11, 1965, resolution. Because the route served a state institution, the spur highway was exempt from the 10,000-mile (16,093 km) state highway system limitation.[149] K-264 was completed between 1965 and 1968.[149][150]

Browse numbered routes
K-263K-265

K-265[edit]

K-265
LocationLeonardville

K-265 was a spur route that was proposed to serve the city of Leonardville in Riley County. The highway was to begin at the Leonardville city limits and run northward to US-24. The Kansas Department of Transportation proposed on March 17, 1965 that US-24 be moved to a new alignment north of Leonardville and that K-265 follow the old US-24 alignment north to the new one. K-265 was never built as US-24 was never rerouted.

Browse numbered routes
K-264K-266

K-266[edit]

K-266
LocationPawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site
Length7.541 mi[1] (12.136 km)
Existed1967–

K-266 is a 7.541-mile-long (12.136 km) state highway located entirely within Republic County in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-266's southern terminus is at US-36 west of the City of Scandia, and the northern terminus is at Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.

The entire route is in Republic County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Courtland Township0.0000.000 US-36 – Mankato, ScandiaSouthern terminus
White Rock Township7.54112.136Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic SiteNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-265K-267

K-267[edit]

K-267
LocationKanorado
Length0.837 mi[1] (1.347 km)
Existed1969–

K-267 is a 0.837-mile-long (1.347 km) spur route that serves the city of Kanorado in west central Sherman County near the Colorado state line.[1][2] The highway begins at a diamond interchange with I-70 and US-24, which run concurrently east–west, between Goodland and Burlington, Colorado. K-267 heads north to Old U.S. Highway 24, onto which the highway turns west to parallel the Kyle Railroad line. The highway ends at Eastern Avenue at the east city limit of Kanorado, from which Old U.S. Highway 24 continues west through a corner of Kanorado to the Colorado state line.[151] The Kansas State Highway Commission approved plans for the portion of I-70 between the Colorado state line and Levant in Thomas County through a June 7, 1966, resolution. As part of these plans, US-24 would have been moved onto I-70 and almost all of the old course of US-24 would be removed from the state highway system. However, the portion of old US-24 from Eastern Avenue to the next section line road joined the portion of that road between old US-24 and I-70 as part of the new K-267.[142] K-267 was marked when I-70 was completed from Goodland to the Colorado state line in late 1969.[64][66]

Browse numbered routes
K-266K-268

K-271[edit]

K-271
LocationMayfield
Length0.657 mi[100] (1.057 km)
Existed1967–2014

K-271 was a 0.657-mile-long (1.057 km) spur route that served the city of Mayfield in Sumner County. The highway began at the Mayfield city limits and ran northward to US-160. The Kansas Department of Transportation removed K-271 from the state highway system through a January 6, 2014 resolution.[100]

Browse numbered routes
US-270K-272

K-272[edit]

K-272
LocationSalina
Length1.019 mi (1.640 km)
ExistedJanuary 22, 1969–November 11, 1971

K-272 was a 1.019-mile-long (1.640 km) spur route that served the Salina Municipal Airport in the city of Salina in Saline County. The highway began at the Salina Municipal Airport and ran eastward to US-81. The Kansas Department of Transportation designated K-272 on January 22, 1969 and removed it from the state highway system through a November 11, 1971 resolution.

Browse numbered routes
K-271K-273

K-273[edit]

K-273
LocationWilliamsburg
Length0.438 mi[152] (0.705 km)
Existed1968–2002

K-273 was a 0.438-mile-long (0.705 km) spur route that served the city of Williamsburg in Franklin County. The highway began at the Williamsburg city limits and ran northward to I-35 and US-50. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-273 in 1968 and then removed it from the state highway system through a September 30, 2002 resolution.[152]

Browse numbered routes
K-272K-274

K-274[edit]

K-274
LocationHays
Length0.416 mi[153] (0.669 km)
Existed1969–1997

K-274 was a 0.416-mile-long (0.669 km) spur route in the city of Hays in Ellis County. The highway began at Fort Hays branch of Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station and ran northward to US-183 Bypass. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-274 on December 23, 1969 and removed it from the state highway system in a November 9, 2009 resolution.[153]

Browse numbered routes
K-273K-276

K-276[edit]

K-276
LocationOlivet
Length1.384 mi[1] (2.227 km)
Existed1970–

K-276 is a 1.384-mile-long (2.227 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-276's western terminus is a continuation as D Avenue at the Olivet city limits, and the eastern terminus is at US-75 east of Olivet.

The entire route is in Osage County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Olivet0.0000.000D AvenueWestern terminus; continues as D Avenue at Olivet city limits
Olivet Township1.3842.227 US-75 – Burlington, LyndonEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-274K-277

K-277[edit]

K-277
LocationNorth of Farlington
Length0.710 mi[154] (1.143 km)
Existed1969–1997

K-277 was a 0.710-mile-long (1.143 km) spur route that served the city of Farlington in Crawford County. The highway began at K-7 north of Farlington and ran eastward to Farlington Lake. The Kansas Department of Transportation assigned K-277 in 1992 and removed it from the state highway system in a June 1, 2013 resolution.[154]

Browse numbered routes
K-276K-278

K-278[edit]

K-278
LocationEisenhower State Park
Length2.988 mi (4.809 km)


K-278 is a 2.988-mile-long (4.809 km) state highway located entirely within Osage County in the U.S. state of Kansas. K-278's western terminus is a continuation as West 293rd Street at the end of state maintenance by the entrance to Eisenhower State Park, and the eastern terminus is at US-75 and K-278 northwest of the City of Melvern.

The entire route is in Osage County.

Locationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
Eisenhower State Park0.0000.000West 293rd StreetWestern terminus; continues west as West 293rd Street at South Fairlawn Road
OlivetMelvern
township line
2.9884.809 US-75 / K-31 (South Jordan Road) – Topeka, BurlingtonEastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
Browse numbered routes
K-277K-279

K-279[edit]

K-279
LocationOsawatomie
Length0.489 mi[1] (0.787 km)
Existed1972–

K-279 is a 0.489-mile-long (0.787 km) spur route that serves Osawatomie State Hospital in the city of Osawatomie in southwestern Miami County.[1][2] The highway begins at Osawatomie Road at the eastern entrance to the psychiatric hospital grounds. K-279 heads east, passing out of and back into the Osawatomie city limits, to a diamond interchange with US-169 and K-7, which run concurrently along the freeway bypass of Osawatomie, between Paola and Garnett.[155] K-279 was established as the route number for a new connector between the US-169 bypass and Osawatomie State Hospital in the same July 19, 1972, resolution in which the Kansas State Highway Commission approved constructing the bypass. The highway was constructed to retain state highway access to the state hospital after US-169 was removed from Old Kansas City Road. Because the route served a state institution, K-279 was exempt from the 10,000-mile (16,093 km) state highway system limitation.[156] The US-169 bypass, K-279, and their interchange opened between 1975 and 1977.[25][26]

Browse numbered routes
K-278US-281

K-284[edit]

K-284
LocationBarnard
Length5.618 mi[1] (9.041 km)
Existed1973–

K-284 is a 5.618-mile-long (9.041 km) spur route that serves the city of Barnard in north central Lincoln County.[1][2]

Browse numbered routes
US-283K-285

K-285[edit]

K-285
LocationDe Soto
Length0.218 mi[157][158] (0.351 km)
Existed1977–c. 1999

K-285 was a 0.218-mile-long (0.351 km) spur route that served the city of De Soto in northwestern Johnson County.[157][158] The highway began at a partial cloverleaf interchange with K-10 between Shawnee and Eudora. K-285 headed north to the south city limit of De Soto, from which the highway continued north along Lexington Avenue.[159][160] The Kansas State Highway Commission authorized the relocation of K-10 onto its freeway between De Soto and K-7 and the removal of old K-10 from the state highway system in a June 15, 1972, resolution. The 0.607-mile-long (0.977 km) portion of old K-10 from the freeway to the south city limit of De Soto would be retained and designated K-285.[157] K-285 replaced the piece of K-10 north of the freeway when the K-10 freeway was completed between 1975 and 1977.[25][26] In 1977, the city of De Soto expanded its limits southward; thus, the Kansas Department of Transportation removed the 0.389-mile-long (0.626 km) portion of K-285 between the old and new south city limit from the state highway system in a January 26, 1977, resolution. The resolution also stated any further annexation of the land under K-285 would automatically result in the relevant length of road being transferred to local control.[158] The city of De Soto activated this provision of the resolution, thus removing K-285 from the state highway system, when the city annexed the remainder of the land under K-285 between 1997 and 1999.[130][161]

Browse numbered routes
K-284K-292

K-368[edit]

K-368
LocationVassar
Length1.000 mi[1] (1.609 km)
Existed1972–

K-368 is a 1.000-mile-long (1.609 km) spur route that serves Pomona State Park near Vassar in east central Osage County.[1][2] The highway begins at K-268 between Lyndon and Quenemo. K-368 heads north and intersects the Flint Hills Nature Trail, a rail trail along a former Missouri Pacific Railroad line, before reaching its north end at the entrance to Pomona State Park.[2][162] The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began to construct Pomona Dam and its associated reservoir in the early 1960s. The federal agency agreed to relocate several county highways that would be displaced by the reservoir, and the Kansas State Highway Commission requested a pair of those highways–an east–west highway between US-75 and K-68 and an access road to the recreational land around the reservoir—be constructed to state highway standards. The commission designated those highways K-268 and K-368, respectively, in a November 14, 1962, resolution.[163] K-268 and K-368 were constructed and added to the state highway system and Pomona Reservoir was completed between 1963 and 1965.[96][108]

Browse numbered routes
K-360K-383

References[edit]

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External links[edit]