List of state leaders in the 1st century

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State leaders in the 1st century BCState leaders in the 2nd centuryState leaders by year

This is a list of state leaders in the 1st century (1–100 AD).

Africa: North[edit]

  • Juba II, client King under Rome (25 BC–23 AD)
  • Ptolemy, client King under Rome (20–40)

America: Mesoamerica[edit]

Asia[edit]

East Asia[edit]

China

  • Gengshi, Emperor (23–25)
  • Guangwu, Emperor (25–57)
  • Ming, Emperor (58–75)
  • Zhang, Emperor (76–88)
  • He, Emperor (89–105)

Korea

  • Onjo, King (18 BC–28 AD)
  • Daru, King (28–77)
  • Giru, King (77–128)
  • Daeso, King (7 BC–22 AD)

South Asia[edit]

  • Satakarni III, King (1 BC-1 AD)
  • Pulumavi I, King (1-36)
  • Gaura Krishna, King (36-61)
  • Hāla, King (61–66)
  • Mandalaka aka Puttalaka or Pulumavi II, King (69-71)
  • Purindrasena, King (71-76)
  • Sundara Satakarni, King (76-77)
  • Chakora Satakarni, King (77-78)
  • Shivasvati, King (78-106)
  • Gautamiputra Satkarni, King (106-130)
  • Vasisthiputra/ Pulumavi III, King (130-158)
  • Shiva Sri Satakarni, King (158-165)
  • Shivaskanda Satakarni, King (165–172)
  • Sri Yajna Satakarni, King (172–201)
  • Vijaya Satakarni, King (201-207)
  • Chandra Sri Satakarni, King (207-214)
  • Pulumavi IV, King (217-224)

Sri Lanka

West Asia[edit]

  • Attambelos II, client King under Parthia (c.17/16 BC–8/9 AD)
  • Abinergaos I, client King under Parthia (10/11–22/23)
  • Orabazes I, client King under Parthia (c.19)
  • Attambelos III, client King under Parthia (c.37/38–44/45)
  • Theonesios II, client King under Parthia (c.46/47)
  • Theonesios III, client King under Parthia (c.52/53)
  • Attambelos IV, client King under Parthia (54/55–64/65)
  • Attambelos V, client King under Parthia (64/65–73/74)
  • Orabazes II, client King under Parthia (c.73–80)
  • Pakoros II, client King under Parthia (80–101/02)
  • Kamnaskires VII, client King under Parthia (c.28 BC–c.1 AD)[4]
  • Kamnaskires VIII, client King under Parthia (c.1–c.15 AD)[5]
  • Kamnaskires IX, client King under Parthia (c.15–c.25)[6]
  • Orodes I, client King under Parthia (c.25–c.50)
  • Orodes II, client King under Parthia (c.50–c.70)
  • Phraates, client King under Parthia (c.70–c.90)[7]
  • Orodes III, client King under Parthia (c.90–c.100)[8]
  • Kamnaskires-Orodes, client King under Parthia (c.100–c.120)[9]

Roman Asia

  • Archelaus, client King under Rome (36 BC–17 AD)
  • client King of Batanaea under Rome (37–41)
  • client King of Galilee under Rome (40–41)
  • client King of all Judaea under Rome (41–44)
  • client Tetrarch of Chalcis under Rome (48–53)
  • client Tetrarch of Batanaea under Rome (53–c.92)
  • Client king of Armenia Minor under Rome (55–72)
  • Client tetrarch of Chalcis under Rome (57–92)

Europe[edit]

Roman Europe

  • Aspurgus, client King under Rome (8 BC–38 AD)
  • Mithridates III, client King under Rome (38–46)
  • Cotys I, client King under Rome (46–63)
  • Incorporated as a part of the Roman Province of Moesia Inferior (63–68)
  • Rhescuporis I, client King under Rome (68–90)
  • Sauromates I, client King under Rome (90–123)
  • Tincomarus, client King of Thrace under Rome (c.20 BC–7 AD)
  • Eppillus, client King of Thrace under Rome (8–15)
  • Verica, client King of Thrace under Rome (15–40)

Eurasian Caucasus[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rajesh Kumar Singh (2013). Ajanta Paintings: 86 Panels of Jatakas and Other Themes. Hari Sena. pp. 15–16. ISBN 9788192510750. 
  2. ^ [1][dead link]
  3. ^ a b [2][dead link]
  4. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires XII and XIII.
  5. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires XIV and XV.
  6. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Late Kamnaskires Successors types 1, 2 and 3.
  7. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Phraates I, II and III.
  8. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Orodes III and IV.
  9. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires-Orodes I and II.
  10. ^ a b Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 72, "At least two of his successors Comosicus and Scorillo/Corilus/Scoriscus became high priests and eventually Dacian, Kings"
  11. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 47
  12. ^ De Imperatoribus Romanis [3]. Retrieved 2007-11-08. "In the year 88, the Romans resumed the offensive. The Roman troops were now led by the general Tettius Iulianus. The battle took place again at Tapae but this time the Romans defeated the Dacians. For fear of falling into a trap, Iulianus abandoned his plans of conquering Sarmizegetuza and, at the same time, Decebalus asked for peace. At first, Domitian refused this request, but after he was defeated in a war in Pannonia against the Marcomanni (a Germanic tribe), the emperor was obliged to accept the peace."
  13. ^ De Imperatoribus Romanis [4]. Retrieved 2007-11-08.