List of state leaders in the 1st century BC

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State leaders in the 2nd century BCState leaders in the 1st centuryState leaders by year

This is a list of state leaders in the 1st century BC (100–1 BC).

Africa: North[edit]

Asia[edit]

Asia: East[edit]

China

  • Wu, Emperor (141–87 BC)
  • Zhao, Emperor (87–74 BC)
  • Liu He, Emperor (74 BC)
  • Xuan Di Emperor (74–49 BC)
  • Yuan, Emperor (48–33 BC)
  • Cheng, Emperor (33–7 BC)
  • Ai, Emperor (7–1 BC)
  • Ping, Emperor (1 BC–5 AD)

Korea: Three Kingdoms

  • Onjo, King (18 BC–28 AD)

Asia: South[edit]

India

  • Vasudeva (c.75–c.66 BC)
  • Bhumimitra (c.66–c.52 BC)
  • Narayana (c.52–c.40 BC)
  • Susharman (c.40–c.30 BC)
  • Satakarni II, King (141–85 BC)
  • Lambodara, King (85–67 BC)
  • Apilaka, King (67-55 BC)
  • Meghasvati, King (55-37 BC)
  • Svati, King (37-19 BC)
  • Skandasvati, King (19-12 BC)
  • Mrigendra Satakarni, King (12-9 BC)
  • Kunatala Satakarni, King (9-1 BC)
  • Satakarni III, King (1 BC-1 AD)

Sri Lanka

Asia: West[edit]

  • Asander, client King under Rome (47 BC, 44–17 BC)
  • Dynamis, client Queen under Rome (47–14 BC)
  • Mithridates, client King under Rome (47–44 BC)
  • Scribonius, King (17–16 BC)
  • Aspurgus, client King under Rome (8 BC–38 AD)
  • Mithridates, client King under Pontus (fl. 65 BC)
  • Machares, client King under Pontus (fl. 65 BC)
  • Aristarchus, client King under Rome (65-47 BC)
  • Kamnaskires III Megas Nikephorus, client King under Parthia (c.85 BC)
  • Kamnaskires IV, client King under Parthia (c.82/1-c.76/5 BC)
  • Kamnaskires V, client King under Parthia (c.73/2–c.46 BC)[2]
  • Kamnaskires VI, client King under Parthia (c.46–c.28 BC)[3]
  • Kamnaskires VII, client King under Parthia (c.28 BC–c.1 AD)[4]
  • Antialcidas, King of Paropamisade, Arachosia, and Gandhara (115–95 BC)
  • Heliokles II, King of Gandhara and Punjab (110–100 BC)
  • Polyxenios, King of Paropamisade and Arachosia (c.100 BC)
  • Demetrius III, King of Gandhara and Punjab (c.100 BC)
  • Philoxenus, King of Paropamisade, Arachosia, Gandhara, and Punjab (100–95 BC)
  • Diomedes, King of Paropamisade (95–90 BC)
  • Amyntas, King of Arachosia and Gandhara (95–90 BC)
  • Epander, King of Punjab (95–90 BC)
  • Theophilos, King of Paropamisade (c.90 BC)
  • Peukolaos, King of Arachosia and Gandhara (c.90 BC)
  • Nicias, King of Paropamisade (90–85 BC)
  • Menander II, King of Arachosia and Gandhara (90–85 BC)
  • Hermaeus, King of Paropamisade (90–70 BC)
  • Archebius, King of Arachosia, Gandhara, and Punjab (90–80 BC)
  • Maues, Indo-Scythian King of Paropamisade, Arachosia, Gandhara, and Punjab (85–60 BC)
  • Artemidoros, King of Gandhara/Punjab (c.80 BC)
  • Apollodotus II, King of Punjab (80–65 BC)
  • Telephos, King of Gandhara (75–70 BC)
  • Hippostratos, King of Western Punjab (65–55 BC)
  • Dionysios, King of Eastern Punjab (65–55 BC)
  • Zoilos II, King of Eastern Punjab (55–35 BC)
  • Apollophanes, King of Eastern Punjab (35–25 BC)
  • Strato II and Strato III, Kings of Eastern Punjab (25 BC–10 AD)
  • High Priest (76–66, 63–40 BC)
  • King (67–66 BC)
  • Ethnarch (47–40 BC)

Europe[edit]

Europe: Balkans[edit]

Europe: British Isles[edit]

Europe: Central[edit]

Europe: East[edit]

Europe: South[edit]

Eurasian Caucasus[edit]

Artaxiad Dynasty
non-dynastic

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rajesh Kumar Singh (2013). Ajanta Paintings: 86 Panels of Jatakas and Other Themes. Hari Sena. pp. 15–16. ISBN 9788192510750. 
  2. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires V, VI, VII, VIII and IX.
  3. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires X and XI.
  4. ^ According to Pakzadian, 2007: Kamnaskires XII and XIII.
  5. ^ Atlas of Classical History by R. Talbert, 1989, page 63, "Getae under Cothelas"
  6. ^ Kurt W. Treptow and Ioan Bolovan in “A history of Romania - East European Monographs”, 1996, ISBN 9780880333450, page 17 "..Two inscriptions discovered at Histria indicate that Geto-Dacian rulers (Zalmodegikos and later Rhemaxos) continued to exercise control over that city-state around 200 BC ...."
  7. ^ The Hellenistic Age from the Battle of Ipsos to the Death of Kleopatra VII by Stanley M. Burstein, 1985, Index Rhemaxos Getic or Scythian ruler
  8. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, Index Dromichaetes, King of the Getians
  9. ^ Kurt W. Treptow and Ioan Bolovan in “A history of Romania - East European Monographs”, 1996, ISBN 9780880333450, page 17 "Two inscriptions discovered at Histria indicate that Geto-Dacian rulers (Zalmodegikos and later Rhemaxos) continued to exercise control over that city-state around 200 BC ...."
  10. ^ McGing B.C.: The foreign policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus
  11. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, Index Rubobostes Dacian, King
  12. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 53, "Dacian, King Oroles"
  13. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 47, "Dicomes of the Getians"
  14. ^ The Roman History: The Reign of Augustus by Cassius Dio, Ian Scott-Kilvert, and John Carter, 1987, page 85: "... Then he completed their destruction with the help of Roles, the, King of a tribe of the Getae. When Roles visited Octavian, he was treated as a friend ..."
  15. ^ Cassius Dio. Roman History, Book LI. "While he was thus engaged, Roles, who had become embroiled with Dapyx, himself also, King of a tribe of the Getae, sent for him. Crassus went to his aid, and by hurling the horse of his opponents back upon their infantry he so thoroughly terrified the latter also that what followed was no longer a battle but a great slaughter of fleeing men of both arms. Next he cut off Dapyx, who had taken refuge in a fort, and besieged him. In the course of the siege someone hailed him from the walls in Greek, obtained a conference with him, and arranged to betray the place. The barbarians, thus captured, turned upon one another, and Dapyx was killed along with many others. His brother, however, Crassus took alive, and not only did him no harm but actually released him."
  16. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 48, "The Dacian, King Cotiso"
  17. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 146, "Zyraxes who ruled in Dobruja"
  18. ^ Studies in Ancient Greek and Roman Society by Robin Osborne, 2004, page 128: "... of its citizens, named Akornion, went on an embassy to Burebista, the first and greatest of the, Kings in Thrace..."
  19. ^ Dacia: Landscape, Colonization and Romanization by Ioana A Oltean, 2007, page 72, "At least two of his successors Comosicus and Scorillo/Corilus/Scoriscus became high priests and eventually Dacian, Kings"
  20. ^ Barrett, Anthony A. (2002). Caligula: The Corruption of Power. Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 978-0-203-13776-5. 
  21. ^ Pettinger, Andrew, The Republic in Danger: Drusus Libo and the Succession of Tiberius (2012), pg. 229
  22. ^ Syme, Ronald, The Augustan Aristocracy (1986), pg. 153
  23. ^ T. R. S. Broughton, The Magistrates of the Roman Republic, Vol II, pg. 409