List of subcamps of Ravensbrück

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The 1959 opening of the Ravensbrück Museum. Wall display showing female prisoners entering Siemens factory under the SS guard

The following, is the list of subcamps of the Ravensbrück concentration camp complex built and run by Nazi Germany during World War II. By 1944 Ravensbrück consisted of a system of between 31,[1] and 40,[2] and up to 70 subcamps,[3] spread out from Austria to the Baltic Sea, with over 70,000 predominantly female prisoners. It was the only major Nazi camp for women.[1][2][3][4]

Selected locations and firms[edit]

  1. Altenburg (over 1,000 prisoners) [2]
  2. Ansbach
  3. Barth (over 1,000 prisoners),[2] for Heinkel-Flugzeugwerke [5]
  4. Belzig
  5. Berlin (over ten camps)
  6. Dabelow
  7. Dresden Universelle
  8. Eberswalde
  9. Feldberg (Mecklenburg)
  10. Fürstenberg/Havel
  11. Genthin
  12. Grüneberg (at Löwenberger Land; over 1,000 prisoners,[2] up to 1,710) for Metall-Poltekonzern, Munitionsfabrik [5]
  13. Hennigsdorf
  14. Hohenlychen
  15. Karlshagen (over 1,000 prisoners) [2]
  16. Klützow
  17. Königsberg in der Neumark (in Chojna) for Flughafen GmbH [5]
  18. Leipzig Shoenfeld (over 1,000 prisoners) [2]
  19. Magdeburg (over 1,000 prisoners)
  20. Malchow concentration camp (over 1,000 prisoners,[2] up to 4,196) [5]
  21. Neubrandenburg (over 1,000 prisoners,[2] up to 4,343) [5]
  22. Neustadt-Glewe (over 1,000 prisoners,[2] up to 4,220) [5]
  23. Peenemünde
  24. Prenzlau
  25. Ravensbrück concentration camp
  26. Rechlin
  27. Retzow
  28. Rostock, for Heinkel-Flugzeugwerke [5]
  29. Rostock-Marienehe
  30. Schoenefeld, Krs. Teltow
  31. Rostock-Schwarzenforst [5][6]
  32. Stargard (in Stargard Szczeciński), for Gerätewerk Pommern GmbH [5][7]
  33. Uckermark concentration camp
  34. Velten near Brandenburg

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b JewishGen (2015). "Ravensbrück (Germany)". Forgotten Camps. JewishGen. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Holocaust Encyclopedia (June 20, 2014). "RAVENSBRÜCK SUBCAMPS". Ravensbrück concentration camp. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington DC. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Center for Holocaust & Genocide Studies (2009). "Ravensbrück Satellite Camps". Memories From My Home. University of Minnesota. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  4. ^ Chuck Ferree (2015). "Ravensbruck". Concentration Camps: Full Listing of Camps. Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Ulrich Herbert; Karin Orth; Christoph Dieckmann (1998). Die nationalsozialistischen Konzentrationslager. Ravensbrück by Bernhard Strebel. Wallstein Verlag. pp. 233–234. ISBN 3892442894. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  6. ^ USHMM Collections (2015). "Testimony of Malkah Ṿaynreb". USC Shoah Foundation Institute. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  7. ^ Holger Sarnes; Bettina Sarnes (June 2, 2009). "Stargard Szczeciński / Stargard i. Pommern". Außenlager des Konzentrationslagers Ravensbrück. Germany - A Memorial. Retrieved 25 February 2015.