List of sumo record holders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Rikishi Monument for Over 50 Consecutive Wins at Tomioka Hachiman Shrine. As of November 2014, the monument carries the names of Tanikaze (63 consecutive wins), Umegatani (58), Tachiyama (56), Futabayama (69), Chiyonofuji (53) and Hakuhō (63).

This is a list of records held by wrestlers of professional sumo. Only performances in official tournaments or honbasho are included here. Since 1958 six honbasho have been held every year, giving wrestlers from the modern era more opportunities to accumulate championships and wins. Before this, tournaments were held less frequently; sometimes only once or twice per year.

Names in bold indicate a still active wrestler.

Most top division championships[edit]

Most wins[edit]

Most consecutive wins[edit]

Name Wins[2] Start End Duration Defeated by
1 Futabayama 69 7 January 1936 3 January 1939 2 years, 11 months and 27 days Akinoumi
2 Tanikaze 63 1 October 1778 6 February 1782 3 years, 4 months and 5 days Onogawa
Hakuhō 63 14 January 2010 2 November 2010 9 months and 19 days Kisenosato
4 Umegatani I 58 1 April 1876 8 January 1881 4 years, 9 months and 7 days Wakashima
5 Tachiyama 56 9 January 1912 7 May 1916 4 years, 3 months and 28 days Tochigiyama
6 Chiyonofuji 53 7 May 1988 15 November 1988 6 months and 8 days Ōnokuni
7 Taihō 45 2 September 1968 2 March 1969 6 months Toda

Most consecutive wins from entry into sumo[edit]

Name Wins Start End Duration Defeated by Highest rank
1 Jōkōryū 27 2 July 2011 13 January 2012 6 months and 11 days Senshō Komusubi
2 Itai 26 1 November 1978 11 May 1979 6 months and 10 days Ōnishiki Komusubi
Tochiazuma II 26 8 January 1995 3 September 1995 7 months and 26 days Dewaarashi Ōzeki
4 Tokitenkū 22 1 September 2002 3 March 2003 6 months and 2 days Furuichi Komusubi
5 Kototenta 21 1 January 1986 1 July 1986 6 months retired Makushita 43

Best top division win ratios[edit]

Most bouts[edit]

Losses by default are excluded.

Most consecutive bouts[edit]

Most tournaments[edit]

Progress to top division[edit]

The table for the fastest progress shows wrestlers with the fewest tournaments from their professional debut to their top division debut since the six tournaments a year system was introduced in 1958. It excludes makushita tsukedashi and sandanme tsukedashi entrants who made their debut in the third makushita division and the fourth sandanme division.

Most special prizes[edit]

Special prizes or sanshō were first awarded in 1947. They can only be given to wrestlers ranked at sekiwake or below. For the current list of active special prize winners, see here.

Name Total Outstanding
Performance
Fighting
Spirit
Technique Years Highest rank
1 Akinoshima 19 7 8 4 1988-99 Sekiwake
2 Kotonishiki 18 7 3 8 1990-98 Sekiwake
3 Kaiō 15 10 5 0 1994-2000 Ōzeki
4 Tsurugamine 14 2 2 10 1956-66 Sekiwake
Asashio 14 10 3 1 1979-83 Ōzeki
Takatōriki 14 3 10 1 1990-2000 Sekiwake
7 Musōyama 13 5 4 4 1994-2000 Ōzeki
Tosanoumi 13 7 5 1 1995-2003 Sekiwake
Kotomitsuki 13 2 4 7 2000-07 Ōzeki
10 Tochiazuma II 12 3 2 7 1996-2001 Ōzeki
11 Takamiyama 11 6 5 0 1968-81 Sekiwake
Daiju 11 4 1 6 1970-73 Ōzeki
Kirinji 11 4 4 3 1975-88 Sekiwake
Hokutoumi 11 3 3 5 1983-86 Yokozuna
Gōeidō 11 5 3 3 2007- Ōzeki
Aminishiki 11 4 1 6 2000- Sekiwake

Most gold stars[edit]

Gold stars or kinboshi are awarded to maegashira ranked wrestlers who defeat a yokozuna. For a list of current kinboshi earners, see here.

Name Total Years Highest rank
1 Akinoshima 16 1988-99 Sekiwake
2 Takamiyama 12 1968-78 Sekiwake
Tochinonada 12 1998-2008 Sekiwake
4 Tosanoumi 11 1995-2003 Sekiwake
5 Kitanonada 10 1954-61 Sekiwake
Annenyama 10 1955-61 Sekiwake
Tsurugamine 10 1955-61 Sekiwake
Dewanishiki 10 1949-63 Sekiwake
Ōzutsu 10 1979-86 Sekiwake
10 Mitsuneyama 9 1944-57 Ōzeki
Tamanoumi 9 1953-58 Sekiwake
Hasegawa 9 1965-74 Sekiwake
Fujizakura 9 1973-81 Sekiwake
Takatōriki 9 1990-98 Sekiwake

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Raiden is said to have had the best record in 28 tournaments between 1790 and 1810, Tanikaze 21 between 1772 and 1793, and Kashiwado 16 between 1812 and 1822. Tachiyama won two unofficial championships and nine official, giving him a total of 11.
  2. ^ the winning streaks of Tanikaze, Umegatani, and Tachiyama were interrupted by draws and rest days. The others listed were all wins only.

References[edit]