List of sushi restaurants

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This is a list of notable sushi restaurants. Sushi is the Japanese preparation and serving of specially prepared vinegared rice combined with varied ingredients such as chiefly seafood (often uncooked), vegetables, and occasionally tropical fruits. Styles of sushi and its presentation vary widely, but the key ingredient is sushi rice, also referred to as shari or sumeshi.

Sushi restaurants[edit]

Feng Sushi in Chelsea, London, England
A Genki Sushi location in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan
  • Araki – a sushi restaurant that received a three-star rating in the 2011 edition of the Michelin Guide for Tokyo, Yokohama and Kamakura.[1]
  • The Araki – run by Japanese chef Mitsuhiro Araki which opened in London in 2014. It was awarded two stars in the 2016 Michelin Guide for the UK and Ireland, before being awarded three in the 2018 guide, making it the first Japanese restaurant to ever win three stars in the UK.[2][3]
  • Azabu Yukimura – a Michelin 3-star sushi restaurant in Azabu-Jūban, Minato, Tokyo, Japan[4]
  • Benihana – an American restaurant company based in Aventura, Florida that owns or franchises 116 Japanese cuisine restaurants around the world, including its flagship Benihana Teppanyaki brand, as well as the Haru (fusion cuisine) and RA Sushi restaurants.[5][6] It was founded by Hiroaki Aoki in New York City.[7]
  • Esaki – a Michelin 3-star sushi restaurant located in the Hills Aoyama building in Shibuya. It is owned and operated by sushi chef Shintaro Esaki.[8]
  • Feng Sushi – a UK-based sushi restaurant chain known for advocating sustainable fish farming[9]
  • Genji – a subsidiary of Peace Dining Corporation, it is a major sushi provider to Whole Foods Market and the largest vendor of sushi in the United States.[10] It serves the eastern U.S., California and the United Kingdom. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the company currently operates over 165 sushi and Japanese cuisine restaurants in 18 U.S. states and D.C., and in London and Scotland.[11]
  • Genki Sushi – a chain of conveyor belt sushi restaurants established in 1990 in Japan.[12][13]
  • Ginza Kojyu – a Michelin 3-star sushi restaurant in Ginza, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan. It is owned and operated by sushi chef Toru Okuda.[14]
  • Ishikawa – a Michelin 3-Star sushi restaurant in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan that is owned and operated by kaiseki chef Hideki Ishikawa.[15]
  • Itsu – a British chain of Asian-inspired fast food shops and restaurants, and a grocery company.[16]
  • Joshuya Brasserie – a former modern sushi brasserie that served edo-style sushi that was located in Berkeley, California.[17]
  • Kanda – a Michelin 3-star sushi restaurant located in Minato, Tokyo. It is owned and operated by sushi chef Hiroyuki Kanda.[18][19]
  • Kura – a conveyor belt sushi restaurant chain with 362 locations in Japan, and a few more outside Japan.[20]
  • Masa – a Michelin three-star Japanese and sushi restaurant located on the fourth floor of the Time Warner Center at 10 Columbus Circle (at West 60th Street and Broadway) in Manhattan in New York City.[21] Masa garnered the Michelin Guide's highest rating starting with the 2009 guide and was the first Japanese restaurant in the U.S. to do so.[22][23]
  • Miya's – located in New Haven, Connecticut, USA, it is the first sustainable sushi restaurant in the world.[24][25][26]
"Paper steamboat", a dish at Sakae Sushi
  • Sakae Sushi – a restaurant chain based in Singapore serving Japanese cuisine,[27] and is the flagship brand of Apex-Pal International Ltd. Aimed at the low to mid-level pricing market, it purveys sushi, sashimi, teppanyaki, yakimono, nabemono, tempura, agemono, ramen, udon, soba and donburi served either à la carte or via a sushi conveyor belt.[28]
  • Sasabune – a Japanese sushi restaurant located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, New York City.[29]
  • Standing Sushi Bar – a Japanese-food restaurant chain in Singapore and Indonesia[30]
Sticks'n'Sushi on Øster Farimagsgade in Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Sticks'n'Sushi – a Copenhagen-based restaurant and take-away chain specialising in sushi and yakitori sticks, it consists of 12 restaurants in the Greater Copenhagen area and 7 restaurants in the UK.[31]
  • Sukiyabashi Jiro – A Michelin 3-star sushi restaurant in Ginza, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan that is owned and operated by sushi master Jiro Ono.[32][33]
  • Sushi Mizutani – a former sushi restaurant in Ginza, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan that was awarded two Michelin stars.[34]
  • Sushi Nakazawa – an upscale Japanese sushi restaurant located on Commerce Street in Manhattan, New York City.[35] Daisuke Nakazawa is its head chef.[35]
  • Sushi of Gari – a Japanese sushi restaurant located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, in 2006 and 2009, Michelin Guide gave it a one-star rating.[36][37][38]
  • Sushi Roku – an upscale American sushi restaurant chain[39]
  • Sushi Saito – a three Michelin Star Japanese cuisine restaurant in Minato, Tokyo, primarily known for serving sushi.[40]
  • Sushi Seki – a Japanese sushi restaurant located on the Upper East Side in Manhattan, New York City[41][42]
  • Sushi Yasuda – a Michelin one-star Japanese sushi restaurant located in the Grand Central area of Midtown Manhattan, in New York City[43]
  • Sushi Yoshitake – a Michelin 3-Star sushi restaurant in Ginza, Chūō, Tokyo, Japan[44][45]
  • Uchi – a contemporary Japanese sushi restaurant located in Austin, Texas[46]
  • Urasawa – a Japanese restaurant located in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California that as of 2014 is considered the second most expensive in the world after Sublimotion, at $1,111 per person.[47]
  • Wasabi – a fast food restaurant chain based in the United Kingdom focused on Japanese food, especially sushi and bento, it operates in London and New York[48]
  • Wasabi Sushi Bar – an American casual dining sushi restaurant chain[49]
  • YO! Sushi – a company that owns, operates, and franchises conveyor belt sushi restaurants, principally in the United Kingdom, Ireland, United States, Europe and the Middle East.[50]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Hill, Lauren (2 October 2017). "Michelin Guide 2018: UK Winners Revealed". Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  3. ^ Khomami, Nadia (October 2, 2017). "Nine-seat Araki sushi restaurant wins three Michelin stars". The Guardian. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
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  5. ^ Doss, Laine (December 18, 2015). "Inside RA Sushi and Benihana's Aventura Test Kitchen". Miami New Times. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  6. ^ Walker, Elaine. Benihana has a location on Commercial Blvd in Fort Lauderdale, which is said to have been frequented by the local Weiss and Nakdimon."Doral, Fla.-Based Benihana Discloses Secret of Its Success." Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. May 26, 1999. Retrieved on January 9, 2010.
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  25. ^ "Speakers | Pages | WWF". Worldwildlife.org. Retrieved 2017-12-28.
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  29. ^ Bruni, Frank (December 27, 2006). "Tough Love at the Sushi Bar". The New York Times.
  30. ^ Tan, Rebecca Lynne (December 4, 2017). "Empire Eats Group's Howard Lo and Lim Hui Nan: Husband and wife bond over work". The Straits Times. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
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External links[edit]