List of tallest buildings in Melbourne

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The skyline of Melbourne in 2013. The Eureka Tower is to the far right, 120 Collins Street in the far centre, and the Rialto Towers to the centre left.

Melbourne, the second largest city in Australia, is home to approximately 700 completed high-rise buildings.[1] Of those completed and or topped-out, 40 buildings are defined as "skyscrapers" (buildings which reach a height of at least 150 metres (490 ft)); more than any other city in Australia. Of the ten tallest buildings in the Australia, five are located in Melbourne. Most of Melbourne's tallest skyscrapers are concentrated in the City Centre precinct; however, other locations of prominent skyscrapers and tall buildings in Melbourne include Carlton, Docklands, Southbank, South Melbourne, South Yarra and St Kilda Road.

Geographically, Melbourne's central business district comprises a western skyline and an eastern skyline. These are divided by the Yarra River, which extends to the city's east. Buildings are more densely packed in the west than the east, although the east has two of the city's tallest buildings to architectural feature–120 Collins Street and 101 Collins Street, respectively, whilst the Rialto Towers (located on the west side) is tallest by roof. As a whole, the city overtook Sydney in 2011 as having the tallest skyline in the country and the 24th tallest in the world, when the heights of the top ten tallest buildings in the city are combined.[2]

Historically, Melbourne has represented several "firsts" and been the holder of various records, both in Australia and internationally. The city is notable for being one of the first cities in the world to build numerous tall office buildings, alongside New York City and Chicago in the United States, though Melbourne's first skyscraper boom was very short lived. Melbourne was the location for Australia's first high–rise, the APA Building, constructed during this boom in 1889.[3] Melbourne was also the location for the first modern post-WW2 high-rise, ICI House built in 1958.[3] From 1986 to 2005, three of Melbourne's skyscrapers held the title of tallest building in Australia, with the Rialto Towers (1986–91), 101 Collins Street (1991) and 120 Collins Street (1991–2005). Since 2006, the city has been home to the second-tallest building in the country, the Eureka Tower; surpassed only by the Gold Coast's Q1, the Eureka Tower still maintains the title of tallest building in Australia to roof. Several other skyscraper projects have since emerged, such as Australia 108 – which when completed in 2020, will surpass the Eureka Tower in height, and become the tallest building in Australia to roof.

History and specifications[edit]

Most of Melbourne's skyscrapers are located in the City Centre (left), although the number of skyscrapers in Southbank (right) has significantly increased since the 2000s.
19th century

The late 1880s 'land boom' saw the construction of a approximately a dozen 'lofty edifices' of 8 to 10 storeys, made possible by the introduction of a pressurised hydraulic power network to operate lifts, and taking load bearing brickwork to great heights. [4]The APA Building (Australian Building) at 12 storeys plus spire, was by far the tallest, and can claim to be Australia's first 'skyscraper' and amongst the tallest building in the world when completed in 1889.[5]

20th century

In the later 20th century, Melbourne was in competition with Sydney for both the largest number of tall buildings, and for hosting the tallest. Melbourne has had the most skyscrapers above 150 metres in Australia and indeed within Oceania, for 31 years in total; from 1972 to 1989 (equal first with Sydney during 1972–74 and 1976–77), from 1991 to 1999, in 2006 (shared with Sydney) and again since 2015 (equal to Sydney from 2015 to 2016).[6]

Melbourne was the first city in Australia to undergo a post-war high-rise boom beginning in the late 1950s, though Sydney in the following decades built more, with over 50 high-rise buildings constructed between the 1970s–90s.[7][8]

In 1972, 140 William Street (formerly BHP House) became Melbourne's first skyscraper to surpass the height of 150 metres. The William Street building was the city's tallest for a few years, and remains one of the few heritage registered skyscrapers in Melbourne. Slightly taller, the Optus Centre was completed in 1975; and then in 1977 Nauru House was crowned the tallest building in Melbourne, at a height of 182 metres. In 1978, what would be the first of two Collins Place towers was opened, at a height of 185 metres.

Decade No. of 150m+
completions
Total
1970s 5 5
1980s 3 8
1990s 9 17
2000s 8 25
2010s complete: 11 49
under-construction: 13
2020s complete: 0 52
under-construction: 3

By the early 1980s, Melbourne had a total of 6 buildings above 150 metres, with the completion of the Sofitel Hotel at Collins Place in 1980. In 1986, the Rialto Towers surpassed Sydney's MLC Centre as the tallest building not only in Australia but in the Southern Hemisphere, with a height of 251 metres. At the time of its opening it was the 23rd–tallest building in the world.[9] The 1990s brought Melbourne another 9 buildings over 150 metres; 5 of which exceed heights of 200 metres. Specifically, 1991 saw the construction of the 260 metre tall 101 Collins Street, which was crowned the tallest building in Australia and the Southern Hemisphere; it was surpassed in height later that year with the completion of the nearby 120 Collins Street.[10] The skyscraper, which stands at 265 metres in height, held the titles for tallest building in Australia and the Southern Hemisphere for fourteen years, until the completion of the Gold Coast's Q1 in 2005.

21st century

During the 2000s, over 20 high-rise structures were completed, including the Eureka Tower, which overtook 120 Collins Street as the tallest building in Melbourne, and further became the second tallest in Australia (although tallest to its roof).[11][12] Eureka Tower was also the tallest residential building in the world, until surpassed by Ocean Heights and the HHHR Tower in Dubai. It is currently the 15th tallest apartment building in the world.[13]

The 2010s have continued this achievement, with Prima Pearl, 568 Collins Street and Vision Apartments being constructed, all of which stand above 220 metres (720 ft) in height. This feat has been described as the "Manhattanization of Melbourne".[14] From the beginning of the decade, the city has experienced an "unprecedented" high-rise construction boom;[15][16][17] of buildings expected to reach 150 metres (or above) in height, 3 have topped-out, 16 are under-construction, 42 have received approval, and another few have been proposed – more than any other city in Australia.[1][18] Of those currently under construction, two projects will surpass 250 metres (820 ft) in height; Aurora Melbourne Central and Australia 108. The latter will be the tallest; reaching 317 metres (1,040 ft) in height, Australia 108 will become the tallest building in Melbourne upon completion in 2020, the tallest building to roof in Australia, Australia's first skyscraper to comprise at least 100 floors, and Melbourne's first building to be defined as a "supertall" skyscraper (buildings which reach heights of 300 metres to 600 metres). After 2020, the next tallest building (currently approved) will be One Queensbridge; with a height of 323 metres (1,060 ft) it will become the tallest building in Australia.

Height limits[edit]

Following much discussion, a 40-metre (132 ft) height limit was introduced to Melbourne in 1916, along with regulations concerning fire-proof construction. This is often said to have been the limit of fire ladders at the time, but this was an idea the then fire chief allowed to be widely circulated even though the tallest ladder rose to only 82ft, in order to ensure that fire safety was paramount.[19] The main reasons for the limit as well as fire proofing were the preservation of light and air to the streets, avoiding congestion, and the influence of the City Beautiful movement, preferring evenly scaled streetscapes over those with buildings of varying heights.[20]

The height limit was discontinued in the 1950s, which enabled the construction of ICI House at a height of 81 metres (266 ft), and Melbourne therefore became the first city in Australia to change its height controls.[21]

In September 2015, the Minister for Planning, Richard Wynne, introduced a 12-month height limit of approximately 229 metres (750 ft) for all buildings proposed in the City Centre and segments of Southbank, as part of interim planning laws set to be reviewed and made permanent in September 2016.[22] Should projects exceed the height limit, developers will need to make a special case to the Minister, outlining the proposal's state significance.[23] Buildings proposed prior to the height limit, are exempt from the new law.[24]

Precincts[edit]

Precinct of
Melbourne
C T-O U-C A P
Carlton 0 0 1 0 0
City Centre 29 3 7 22 3
Docklands 0 0 0 1 0
Southbank 6 1 3 16 3
South Melbourne 0 0 0 3 0
South Yarra 0 0 1 0 0
St Kilda Road 1 0 0 0 0
Total 36 4 12 42 6

The central business district skyline is broken down into two distinct sections: the east and west, divided by the Swanston Street.[25] The tallest buildings on the eastern side of the skyline are 120 Collins Street and 101 Collins Street, while the tallest on the western side are the Rialto Towers, 568 Collins Street and Bourke Place.

During the last fifteen years, high-rise density has taken form in urban renewal regions like Southbank.

Significant new skylines have emerged outside of the Melbourne City Centre, especially within the inner-city suburb of Southbank. This precinct, located adjacent to the City Centre, includes some of the tallest buildings in Melbourne, such as Eureka Tower, Prima Pearl and Freshwater Place North.[26]

St Kilda Road, a locality of the City Centre (with a separate postal code) comprises one skyscraper above 150 metres in height, the Royal Domain Tower. Other inner-city suburbs, such as Carlton, Docklands, South Melbourne and South Yarra each have skyscrapers (of heights reaching at least 150 metres) in proposed/approved or construction stages of development.[27]

Functions[edit]

Most of Melbourne's skyscrapers constructed by the 1990s were built for commercial purposes – specifically, used as offices. Exceptions to this, include the mixed–use building Sofitel Hotel (1980) on Collins Place, and the all-hotel Crown Towers (1997) in Southbank.[28] 2005 ushered in the first residential skyscrapers in Melbourne, with two built that year.[29] By 2010, 72% of skyscrapers built in Melbourne were of commercial use, 12% residential, 12% mixed-use, and 4% hotel.[30] The trend towards residential skyscrapers has continued significantly; in 2015, 58% of skyscrapers present within the city were of commercial use, 26% residential, 13% mixed-use and 3% hotel.[31] These figures are set to change dramatically by 2020; when factoring those buildings still under-construction (but to be completed by 2020), 41% of the city's skyscrapers will be of residential use, 37% commercial, 20% mixed-use and 2% hotel.[32]

Completed[edit]

The skyline of Melbourne city as viewed from Williamstown, Victoria, in June 2015. Prominent skyscrapers visible in this image include Bourke Place and 568 Collins Street, left of centre; the Rialto Towers, centre; and on the right of centre, 120 Collins Street, 101 Collins Street, Freshwater Place North, Prima Pearl and the Eureka Tower.

Overall[edit]

Melbourne comprises 40 skyscrapers completed or topped out within the city, which stand at least 150 metres (490 ft) tall, based on standard height measurement.[18] Such measurement includes spires and architectural details, but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. An asterisk (*) indicates that the building is still under construction, but has topped out. The "completion" column indicates the year in which a building was completed. Height: S = Spire, R = Roof. Height is measured to the nearest metre.

Name (Street address) Image Height Total Floors Built Purpose Location Notes
S R
1 Eureka Tower
(7 Riverside Quay)
Eureka Tower, August 2010.png 297.3 m
(975 ft)
91 2006 Residential Southbank
37°49′18″S 144°57′52″E / 37.82167°S 144.96444°E / -37.82167; 144.96444
2nd-tallest building in Australia; Tallest building in Australia to roof. First proposed in 1999, construction commenced in 2001. Completed in 2006, it was the world's tallest residential tower when measured to its highest floor, until surpassed by Ocean Heights and the HHHR Tower in Dubai. As of December 2016, it is the 15th tallest residential building in the world.[13] Tallest residential building in Australia to roof. Tallest building completed during the 2000s.[33] Recipient of the 2006 Bronze Emporis Skyscraper Award.[34][35]
2 120 Collins Street 120 Collins Street, Jan. 2016 (darker).png 264.9 m
(869 ft)
222.2 m
(729 ft)
52 1991 Office City Centre
37°48′51.2″S 144°58′10.9″E / 37.814222°S 144.969694°E / -37.814222; 144.969694
3rd-tallest building in Australia; 14th-tallest building in Australia to roof. First proposed in 1986, construction commenced in 1989. Completed in 1991, it became the tallest building in Australia, until it was surpassed by Q1 on the Gold Coast, Queensland in 2005. Tallest office building in Australia. Tallest building completed during the 1990s.[36][37][38]
3 101 Collins Street 101 Collins Street, Jan. 2016.png 260 m
(853 ft)
195 m
(640 ft)
50 1991 Office City Centre
37°48′54″S 144°58′14.8″E / 37.81500°S 144.970778°E / -37.81500; 144.970778
4th-tallest building in Australia; 24th-tallest building in Australia to roof. First proposed in 1987, construction commenced in 1988. Completed in 1991, it briefly reigned as the tallest building in Australia, until the completion of 120 Collins Street later in 1991. 2nd-tallest office building in Australia.[39][40][41]
4 Prima Pearl
(31–49 Queensbridge Square)
Pearl Tower.jpg 254 m
(833 ft)
72 2014 Residential Southbank
37°49′22.6″S 144°57′41.0″E / 37.822944°S 144.961389°E / -37.822944; 144.961389
6th-tallest building in Australia; 2nd-tallest building in Australia to roof. 2nd-tallest residential building in Australia to roof. First proposed in 2004, construction commenced in 2012 and it was completed in 2014. Tallest building completed during the 2010s.[42]
5 Rialto Towers
(525 Collins Street)
Rialto Towers in Aug. 2015 (cropped).jpg 251.1 m
(824 ft)
63 1986 Office City Centre
37°49′7.4″S 144°57′26.9″E / 37.818722°S 144.957472°E / -37.818722; 144.957472
7th-tallest building in Australia; 3rd-tallest building in Australia to roof. First proposed in c.1980, construction commenced in 1982. Completed in 1986, it became the tallest building in Australia and one of the tallest in the world, until the former title was surpassed by 101 Collins Street in 1991. It remained the tallest building in Australia to roof, until the completion of the Eureka Tower, in 2006. Tallest building completed during the 1980s.[43][44]
6 Victoria One
(452 Elizabeth Street)
Victoria One, under construction in May 2017 2.jpg 245.7 m
(806 ft)
78 2018 Residential City Centre
37°48′30.1″S 144°57′38.6″E / 37.808361°S 144.960722°E / -37.808361; 144.960722
10th-tallest building in Australia; designed by Elenberg Fraser. First proposed in 2013, construction commenced in 2014; having topped–out in June 2017, the project is expected to be completed in 2018.[45][46][47][48]
7 Vision Apartments
(500 Elizabeth Street)
Vision Apartments, June 2016.png 229 m
(751 ft)
70 2016 Residential City Centre
37°48′26″S 144°57′36.8″E / 37.80722°S 144.960222°E / -37.80722; 144.960222
21st-tallest building in Australia. First proposed in 2011, construction commenced in 2013, before being completed in 2016.[49]
=8 568 Collins Street 568 Collins Street, June 2015.jpg 224 m
(735 ft)
68 2015 Mixed Use City Centre
37°49′6.1″S 144°57′19.6″E / 37.818361°S 144.955444°E / -37.818361; 144.955444
Equal 19th-tallest building in Australia; Equal 12th-tallest building in Australia to roof.[50] First proposed in 2011, construction commenced in 2012, before being completed in 2015.[51]
Bourke Place
(600 Bourke Street)
Bourke Place 2008.jpg 224 m
(735 ft)
49 1991 Office City Centre
37°48′57″S 144°57′21.7″E / 37.81583°S 144.956028°E / -37.81583; 144.956028
Equal 19th-tallest building in Australia; Equal 12th-tallest building in Australia to roof. A 30 m communications mast sits atop the building.[52]
=10 Light House Melbourne
(450 Elizabeth Street)
Light House Melbourne, May 2017, edited.jpg 218 m
(715 ft)
69 2018 Residential City Centre
37°48′30.1″S 144°57′38.6″E / 37.808361°S 144.960722°E / -37.808361; 144.960722
Equal–25th-tallest building in Australia; designed by Elenberg Fraser. First proposed in 2013, construction commenced in 2015; having topped–out in February 2017, the project is expected to be completed in 2018.[53]
Telstra Corporate Centre
(242 Exhibition Street)
Telstra Corporate Centre, cropped.png 218 m
(715 ft)
193 m
(633 ft)
47 1992 Office City Centre
37°48′34.1″S 144°58′10.9″E / 37.809472°S 144.969694°E / -37.809472; 144.969694
Equal–25th-tallest building in Australia; 27th-tallest building in Australia to roof.[54][55]
12 Melbourne Central
(350 Elizabeth Street)
Melbourne Central.jpg 211 m
(692 ft)
53 1991 Office City Centre
37°48′39.2″S 144°57′43.2″E / 37.810889°S 144.962000°E / -37.810889; 144.962000
27th-tallest building in Australia; 18th-tallest building in Australia to roof.[56]
13 Freshwater Place North
(1 Queensbridge Square)
Freshwater Place in Southbank, in July 2007.png 205 m
(673 ft)
60 2005 Residential Southbank
37°49′18.7″S 144°57′41.5″E / 37.821861°S 144.961528°E / -37.821861; 144.961528
29th-tallest building in Australia; 21st-tallest building in Australia to roof. Construction commenced in 2002, and the building was completed in 2005.[57]
14 Eq. Tower
(127–141 A Beckett Street)
Eq Tower, Feb 2017.jpg 202.7 m
(665 ft)
63 2017 Residential City Centre
37°48′35.1″S 144°57′34.8″E / 37.809750°S 144.959667°E / -37.809750; 144.959667
31st-tallest building in Australia; designed by Elenberg Fraser. First proposed in 2014, construction commenced in 2015, with a 2017 completion date.[58]
15 Empire Melbourne
(398 Elizabeth Street)
Empire Melbourne, Feb 2017.png 198 m
(650 ft)
63 2017 Residential City Centre
37°48′33.8″S 144°57′40.3″E / 37.809389°S 144.961194°E / -37.809389; 144.961194
Designed by Hayball Architecture. First proposed in 2014, construction commenced in 2015; having topped–out in February 2017, the project is expected to be completed in 2017.[59]
16 Abode318
(312–318 Russell Street)
Abode318 29 August 2014.jpg 187.3 m
(615 ft)
57 2015 Residential City Centre
37°48′33.2″S 144°58′0.3″E / 37.809222°S 144.966750°E / -37.809222; 144.966750
Designed by Elenberg Fraser. First proposed in 2007, construction commenced in 2011. Completed in 2015.[60]
=17 Sofitel Hotel at Collins Place
(35 Collins Street)
35CollinStreet1.JPG 185 m
(607 ft)
50 1980 Mixed Use City Centre
37°48′50″S 144°58′22.9″E / 37.81389°S 144.973028°E / -37.81389; 144.973028
Completed in 1980, it became the city's tallest building, until it was surpassed by the Rialto Towers in 1986.[61][62]
ANZ Tower at Collins Place
(55 Collins Street)
Collins Place (ANZ) 2008.jpg 185 m
(607 ft)
46 1978 Office City Centre
37°48′51.6″S 144°58′20.6″E / 37.814333°S 144.972389°E / -37.814333; 144.972389
Completed in 1978, it became the city's tallest building, until it was surpassed by the Sofitel Hotel in 1980, also at Collins Place. First proposed in 1970, construction commenced in 1973, and it was completed in 1978. Tallest building completed during the 1970s.[61][63]
19 Nauru House
(80 Collins Street)
Nauru house.JPG 182 m
(597 ft)
54 1977 Office City Centre
37°48′50.6″S 144°58′14.7″E / 37.814056°S 144.970750°E / -37.814056; 144.970750
Completed in 1977, it briefly became the city's tallest building, until it was surpassed by the ANZ Tower at Collins Place in 1978.[61][64]
20 MY80
(410 Elizabeth Street)
My80 10 May 2014.png 173 m
(568 ft)
55 2014 Residential City Centre
37°48′32.3″S 144°57′39.6″E / 37.808972°S 144.961000°E / -37.808972; 144.961000
Designed by Hayball Architecture. First proposed in 2010, construction commenced in 2011, before being completed in 2014.[65]
21 Upper West Side Tower 5
(33 Rose Lane)
170 m
(558 ft)
53 2016 Residential City Centre
37°48′53.6″S 144°57′14.1″E / 37.814889°S 144.953917°E / -37.814889; 144.953917
Tallest building of the Upper West Side complex. Building also referred to as 'Manhattan'. First proposed in 2011, construction commenced in 2013, before being completed in 2016.[66]
22 385 Bourke Street 385 Bourke Street.jpg 169 m
(554 ft)
45 1983 Office City Centre
37°48′53.1″S 144°57′46.3″E / 37.814750°S 144.962861°E / -37.814750; 144.962861
Designed by Norman Disney & Young[67]
23 Zen Apartments
(27 Therry Street)
Zen Apartments in December 2013 crop.png 167.8 m
(551 ft)
50 2012 Residential City Centre
37°48′25″S 144°57′39.8″E / 37.80694°S 144.961056°E / -37.80694; 144.961056
Designed by Urban Design Architects. First proposed in 2008, construction commenced in 2009, before being completed in 2012.[68]
=24 Platinum Tower One
(245–263 City Road)
Platinum Tower, Jan. 2016 1.png 167 m
(548 ft)
52 2016 Residential Southbank
37°49′36.5″S 144°57′33.9″E / 37.826806°S 144.959417°E / -37.826806; 144.959417
Designed by Squillace. First proposed in 2011, construction commenced in 2014, before being completed in 2016.[69]
530 Collins Street 530 Collins Street.jpg 167 m
(548 ft)
43 1991 Office City Centre
37°49′4″S 144°57′24.4″E / 37.81778°S 144.956778°E / -37.81778; 144.956778
Designed by Peddle Thorp Architects[70]
=26 Casselden Place
(2 Lonsdale Street)
Casselden Place in 2014.jpg 166 m
(545 ft)
43 1992 Office City Centre
37°48′33.5″S 144°58′17.6″E / 37.809306°S 144.971556°E / -37.809306; 144.971556
Designed by HASSELL[71]
35 Spring Street 35 Spring Street UC, in July 2016. Rotated and cropped.gif 166 m
(545 ft)
43 2017 Residential City Centre
37°48′51″S 144°58′26.5″E / 37.81417°S 144.974028°E / -37.81417; 144.974028
First proposed in 2013, construction commenced in 2014. Completed in 2017.[72][73]
28 Ernst & Young Tower
(8 Exhibition Street, Melbourne)
Ernst & Young Tower, 2006.jpg 164.7 m
(540 ft)
40 2005 Mixed Use City Centre
37°48′55.4″S 144°58′22″E / 37.815389°S 144.97278°E / -37.815389; 144.97278
Designed by Denton Corker Marshall.[40] First proposed in 2001, construction commenced in 2003. Completed in 2005.[74]
29 SX Stage 1
(121 Exhibition Street)
Southern cross tower.jpg 163 m
(535 ft)
40 2005 Office City Centre
37°48′45.4″S 144°58′13.2″E / 37.812611°S 144.970333°E / -37.812611; 144.970333
Designed by Woods Bagot Melbourne. Construction commenced in 2003, and it was completed in 2005.[75]
=30 Royal Domain Tower
(368 St Kilda Road)
Royal Domain Tower, 2013.jpg 162 m
(531 ft)
43 2005 Residential St Kilda Road
37°49′54.2″S 144°58′16.3″E / 37.831722°S 144.971194°E / -37.831722; 144.971194
Tallest building within the St Kilda Road precinct of Melbourne, and only building to reach a height of 150 metres in this precinct. Designed by Meinhardt Group. Construction commenced in 2003, and it was completed in 2005.[76]
ANZ World Headquarters
(100 Queen Street)
Anz world headquarters queen street melbourne.jpg 162 m
(531 ft)
37 1993 Office City Centre
37°48′59.7″S 144°57′42.3″E / 37.816583°S 144.961750°E / -37.816583; 144.961750
Designed by Peddle Thorp Architects[77]
32 National Bank House
(500 Bourke Street)
Nab tower Melb.jpg 161 m
(528 ft)
40 1978 Office City Centre
37°48′54.4″S 144°57′31.6″E / 37.815111°S 144.958778°E / -37.815111; 144.958778
[78]
33 2 Southbank Boulevard PWC Tower, Jan. 2016.png 160.8 m
(528 ft)
40 2005 Office Southbank
37°49′17.5″S 144°57′44.8″E / 37.821528°S 144.962444°E / -37.821528; 144.962444
Designed by Bates Smart. Construction commenced in 2002, and it was completed in 2005.[79]
34 Verve 501 Swanston Tower
(501 Swanston Street)
Verve 501 Swanston Tower in 2011.jpg 159 m
(522 ft)
45 2006 Mixed Use City Centre
37°48′24.8″S 144°57′42.4″E / 37.806889°S 144.961778°E / -37.806889; 144.961778
Designed by Urban Design Architects. Construction commenced in 2004, and it was completed in 2006.[80]
35 Upper West Side Tower 2
(Lonsdale Street)
UWS Madison, June 2015.jpg 156 m
(512 ft)
50 2014 Residential City Centre
37°48′54.5″S 144°57′14″E / 37.815139°S 144.95389°E / -37.815139; 144.95389
2nd-tallest building of the Upper West Side complex. Building also referred to as 'Madison'. Construction commenced in 2011, and it was completed in 2014.[81]
=36 Southbank Central
(1–11 Balston Street)
Southbank Central, Feb 2017.jpg 153 m
(502 ft)
48 2017 Residential Southbank
37°49′30.6″S 144°57′41.1″E / 37.825167°S 144.961417°E / -37.825167; 144.961417
First proposed in 2014, construction commenced in 2015; having topped–out in May 2017, the project is expected to be later in 2017.[82]
Optus Centre
(367 Collins Street)
Optus Centre 2a.jpg 153 m
(502 ft)
34 1975 Office City Centre
37°49′1.8″S 144°57′44.7″E / 37.817167°S 144.962417°E / -37.817167; 144.962417
Completed in 1975, it became the city's tallest building, until it was surpassed by Nauru House in 1977.[61][83]
=38 Crown Towers
(8 Whiteman Street)
Crown Towers, Melbourne Australia in 2010.jpg 152.5 m
(500 ft)
43 1997 Hotel Southbank
37°49′20.4″S 144°57′37.3″E / 37.822333°S 144.960361°E / -37.822333; 144.960361
Tallest of three Crown hotels in Melbourne. Tallest all-hotel building in Australia.[84] Designed by Hudson Conway Architects and Daryl Jackson.[85]
140 William Street 140 William St - Photo 1.jpg 152.5 m
(500 ft)
41 1972 Office City Centre
37°48′57″S 144°57′31.8″E / 37.81583°S 144.958833°E / -37.81583; 144.958833
Construction commenced in 1969; completed in 1972, it became the city's tallest building, until it was surpassed by Optus Centre in 1975, by 50 centimetres.[61][86][87] Recipient of the RVIA Victorian Architects award in 1975.[88]
40 Urban Workshop Lonsdale
(50 Lonsdale Street)
Urban Workshop Lonsdale, June 2015.jpg 150 m
(492 ft)
34 2005 Office City Centre
37°48′33.4″S 144°58′14.4″E / 37.809278°S 144.970667°E / -37.809278; 144.970667
Designed by HASSELL, John Wardle Architects and B+N Group[89]

Tallest buildings by precinct[edit]

This lists the tallest building in each precinct of Melbourne based on standard height measurement.

Rank Name Height Storeys Precinct
of Melbourne
Completion
List
1 1 Eureka Tower 297.3 m (975 ft) 91 Southbank 2006[35]
2 2 120 Collins Street 264.9 m (869 ft) 52 City Centre 1991[36]
3 =27 Royal Domain Tower 162 m (531 ft) 43 St Kilda Road 2005[76]
4 KPMG Collins Square 145 m (476 ft) 36 Docklands 2016[90]
5 Vogue 126 m (413 ft) 31 South Yarra 2012[91]
6 Portrait 115 m (377 ft) 33 Carlton 2015[92]
7 Fifty Albert 98.1 m (322 ft) 30 South Melbourne 2013[93]

Tallest buildings by function[edit]

This lists the tallest buildings in Melbourne by their respective functions—office, hotel, residential and mixed–use—based on standard height measurement.

Rank Name Height Storeys Function Completion
List
1 1 Eureka Tower 297.3 m (975 ft) 91 Residential 2006[35]
2 2 120 Collins Street 264.9 m (869 ft) 52 Office 1991[36]
3 =6 568 Collins Street 224 m (735 ft) 68 Mixed–use 2015[51]
4 =33 Crown Towers 152.5 m (500 ft) 43 Hotel 1997[85]

Skyscrapers at least 200 metres in height[edit]

Melbourne comprises 13 skyscrapers (completed or topped-out) which reach a height of at least 200 metres (660 ft) – more than any other city within Australia and Oceania. Of those, 10 skyscrapers are located within the City Centre, and 3 are located within Southbank. Another 6 skyscrapers are currently under construction, 4 of which are to be built in the City Centre, and the remaining 2 in Carlton and Southbank.

Buildings above 200 metres in height in Melbourne. Skyscrapers in black are complete, while skyscrapers coloured orange are in the construction phase

Historical tallest buildings[edit]

This section lists the ten tallest buildings in Melbourne for every decade since 1990. By 1980, all buildings within the top-10 listing reached a height of 100 metres (330 ft); in 1995, the threshold increased to 150 metres (490 ft); and again in 2015, to 200 metres (660 ft).

1990[94]
Rank Building Height Built Diagram
1 Rialto Towers 251.1 m (824 ft) 1986 Melbourne1990.png
2 Sofitel Hotel 185 m (607 ft) 1980
ANZ Tower 185 m (607 ft) 1978
4 Nauru House 182 m (597 ft) 1977
5 385 Bourke Street 169 m (554 ft) 1983
6 National Bank House 161 m (528 ft) 1978
7 Optus Centre 153 m (502 ft) 1975
8 140 William Street 152.5 m (500 ft) 1972
9 360 Collins Street 142 m (466 ft) 1978
10 1 Spring Street 132 m (433 ft) 1988
2000[95]
Rank Building Height Built Diagram
1 120 Collins Street 264.9 m (869 ft) 1991 Melbourne1995&2000.png
2 101 Collins Street 260 m (850 ft) 1991
3 Rialto Towers 251.1 m (824 ft) 1986
4 Bourke Place 224 m (735 ft) 1991
5 Telstra Corporate Centre 218 m (715 ft) 1992
6 Melbourne Central 211 m (692 ft) 1991
7 Sofitel Hotel 185 m (607 ft) 1980
ANZ Tower 185 m (607 ft) 1978
9 Nauru House 182 m (597 ft) 1977
10 385 Bourke Street 169 m (554 ft) 1983
2010[96]
Rank Building Height Built Diagram
1 Eureka Tower 297.3 m (975 ft) 2006 Melbourne2010.png
2 120 Collins Street 264.9 m (869 ft) 1991
3 101 Collins Street 260 m (850 ft) 1991
4 Rialto Towers 251.1 m (824 ft) 1986
5 Bourke Place 224 m (735 ft) 1991
6 Telstra Corporate Centre 218 m (715 ft) 1992
7 Melbourne Central 211 m (692 ft) 1991
8 Freshwater Place North 205 m (673 ft) 2005
9 Sofitel Hotel 185 m (607 ft) 1980
ANZ Tower 185 m (607 ft) 1978
2020[97]
Rank Building Height Built Diagram
1 Australia 108 316.7 m (1,039 ft) 2020 Melbourne2020.png
2 Eureka Tower 297.3 m (975 ft) 2006
3 Aurora Melbourne Central 268.5 m (881 ft) 2019
4 120 Collins Street 264.9 m (869 ft) 1991
5 101 Collins Street 260 m (850 ft) 1991
6 Prima Pearl 254 m (833 ft) 2014
7 Rialto Towers 251 m (823 ft) 1986
8 Premier Tower 249 m (817 ft) 2020
9 Victoria One 245.7 m (806 ft) 2018
10 Swanston Central 236.7 m (777 ft) 2019

Timeline of tallest buildings[edit]

This lists buildings that once held the title of "tallest building in Melbourne".

Name Image Years as tallest Height floors Notes
Kew Asylum Kew Asylum.jpg 1871–76 30 m (98 ft) 5 [98]
Yorkshire Brewery Tower Yorkshire Brewery Tower.jpg 1876–88 34 m (112 ft) 8 [98][86]
Fink's Building 1888–89 43 m (141 ft) 10 Demolished in 1897[98][99]
The Australian Building The Australian Building.jpg 1889–1932 53 m (174 ft) 12 Demolished in 1980[98][86]
Manchester Unity Building Manchester Unity Building (1932) with Burke and Wills.jpg 1932–58 64 m (210 ft) 13 [98][100]
Orica House Orica House.jpg 1958–62 81 m (266 ft) 20 Tallest building in Australia (1958–61)[101][86]
CRA Building 1962–69 99 m (325 ft) 26 Demolished in c.1980[98][102][103]
AMP Square AMP Tower Melb.jpg 1969–71 113.4 m (372 ft) 28 [98][86][104][105]
Marland House Marland House 2007.jpg 1971–72 121 m (397 ft) 32 [98][86][106][107]
140 William Street 140 william st.jpg 1972–75 152.5 m (500 ft) 41 [98][86][98][87]
Optus Centre Optus Centre 2a.jpg 1975–77 153 m (502 ft) 34 [98][83]
Nauru House Nauru House AON.jpg 1977–78 182 m (597 ft) 52 [98][64]
ANZ Tower at Collins Place 35 and 55 from Collins Street.JPG 1978–80 185 m (607 ft) 56 [98][63]
Sofitel Hotel at Collins Place 35CollinStreet1.JPG 1980–86 185 m (607 ft) 50 [62]
Rialto Towers Rialto Towers in May 2017, edit.png 1986–91 251.1 m (824 ft) 63 Tallest building in Australia (1986–91), tallest building in Australia to roof (1986–2006)[98][43]
101 Collins Street 101 Collins Street December 2009.jpg 1991 260 m (850 ft) 50 Tallest building in Australia (1991)[98][39]
120 Collins Street 120 Collins Street west facade upper detail.jpg 1991–2006 264.9 m (869 ft) 52 Tallest building in Australia (1991–2005)[98][36]
Eureka Tower Eureka Tower, in May 2017.jpg 2006–present 297.3 m (975 ft) 91 Tallest building in Australia to roof (2006–present)[98][35]

Major future projects[edit]

This is a list of currently Topped Out, Under Construction, Approved and Proposed highrise / skyscrapers set for Melbourne.[108]

Australia 108 under construction in May 2017. The project is expected to be completed in 2020.
Aurora Melbourne Central under construction in December 2016. The project is expected to be completed in 2019.
Victoria One under construction in May 2017. The project is expected to be completed in 2018.
Key:
Topped Out Under Construction Approved Proposed
Name Height Storeys Purpose Precinct
of Melbourne
Completion Status
m ft
One Queensbridge 323.6 1,062 90 Mixed Use Southbank TBA Approved[109][110]
Australia 108 316.7 1,039 100 Residential Southbank 2020[111] Under Construction[112]
25–35 Power Street 280 920 71 Mixed Use Southbank TBA Approved[113][114]
West Side Place Tower 1 270 890 85 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[115][116][117][118]
Aurora Melbourne Central 268.5 881 88 Residential City Centre 2019 Under Construction[119][120][121]
308 Exhibition Street Tower 1 255 837 70 Residential City Centre TBA Proposed[122][123]
280 Queen Street 251.8 826 80 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[124][125]
308 Exhibition Street Tower 2 251 823 70 Residential City Centre TBA Proposed[122][123]
Queens Place Tower 2 249 817 79 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[126][127][128]
Premier Tower 249 817 78 Residential City Centre 2020 Under Construction[129]
Queens Place Tower 1 246 807 79 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[126][128][130]
Victoria One 245.7 806 78 Residential City Centre 2018 Topped Out[48]
Elysium 243.8 800 75 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[131][132][133]
383 La Trobe Street 242 794 70 Mixed Use City Centre TBA Approved[134][135]
West Side Place Tower 2 240 790 75 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[116][117][118]
Swanston Central 236.7 777 72 Residential Carlton 2019 Under Construction[136][137][138]
51–65 Clarke Street 233 764 73 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[139][140][141]
556–558 Lonsdale Street 233 764 67 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[142][143]
West Side Place Tower 4 230 750 68 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[116][117][118]
295 City Road 228 748 70 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[144][145]
Melbourne Square Tower 1 226 741 72 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[146][147][148]
Melbourne Square Tower 2 226 741 72 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[146][147][148]
Tower Melbourne 226 741 71 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[149][150][151]
71–87 City Road 224.6 737 67 Residential Southbank TBA Proposed[152]
640 Bourke Street 220 720 68 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[153][154]
380 Lonsdale Street (North tower) 217.5 714 67 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[155][156][157]
158 City Road 218 715 65 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[158]
Light House Melbourne 218 715 62 Residential City Centre 2018 Topped Out[53][159][160]
97 Franklin Street 216 709 62 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[161]
303 La Trobe Street 213 699 66 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[162][163]
295–309 King Street 210.6 691 63 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[164][165]
111–125 A'Beckett Street 210 690 65 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[166][167]
West Side Place Tower 3 210 690 63 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[116][117][118]
272 Queen Street 210 690 62 Mixed Use City Centre TBA Approved[168]
88 Melbourne 208.5 684 60 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[169][170]
Collins House 204 669 61 Residential City Centre 2018 Under Construction[171][172]
63 Exhibition Street 204 669 58 Residential City Centre TBA Proposed[173]
Empire Melbourne 198 650 62 Residential City Centre 2017 Topped Out[59][174][175][176]
256–260 City Road 193 633 61 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[177][178][179]
334–344 City Road 190 620 57 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[180][181]
140 King Street 188 617 57 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[182][183]
268–274 City Road 187.1 614 55 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[184]
80–82 Collins Street 187 614 36 Office City Centre TBA Under Construction[185][186]
582–606 Collins Street 185.5 609 54 Mixed Use City Centre TBA Approved[187][188]
Melbourne Square Tower 5 180 590 54 Hotel Southbank TBA Approved[146][147][148]
Capitol Grand 177.8 583 50 Residential South Yarra 2019 Under Construction[189][190][191]
Melbourne Square Tower 3 175 574 56 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[146][147][148]
Melbourne Square Tower 4 175 574 56 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[146][147][148]
60–82 Johnson Street Twin Towers 1 175 574 51 Residential South Melbourne TBA Approved[192][193]
60–82 Johnson Street Twin Towers 2 175 574 51 Residential South Melbourne TBA Approved[192][193]
32 Flinders Street 174 571 54 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[194][195]
87–105 Queensbridge 171.6 563 51 Residential Southbank TBA Proposed[196]
Avant 167 548 56 Residential City Centre 2018[197] Under Construction[198][199]
380 Lonsdale Street (South tower) 167 548 51 Residential City Centre TBA Approved[155][156]
228–238 Normanby Road 164.3 539 49 Residential South Melbourne TBA Approved[200][201]
The Fifth 165 541 52 Residential City Centre 2017 Under Construction[202]
405 Bourke Street 161 528 39 Office City Centre TBA Approved[203][204]
Southbank Place 159 522 52 Residential Southbank 2018 Under Construction[205][206]
477 Collins Street 158 518 38 Office City Centre 2019 Under Construction[207][208]
57 Haig Street 155.7 511 47 Residential Southbank TBA Approved[209][210]
Southbank Central 153 502 48 Residential Southbank 2017 Topped Out[82]
Shadow Play 153 502 52 Residential Southbank 2018 Under Construction[211][212]
Questo 151 495 48 Residential Southbank TBA Proposed[213][214]
85–93 Lorimer Street 150 490 49 Residential Docklands TBA Approved[215][216]

Major cancelled or vision projects[edit]

This is a list of cancelled or vision skyscraper proposals that were previously set for Melbourne.

Key:
Revised Cancelled Vision
Name Height Storeys Purpose Precinct
of Melbourne
Proposed Status
m ft
Grollo Tower 680 2,230 137 Mixed Use Docklands 1997 Cancelled[217]
South Pacific Centre 610 2,000 150 Mixed Use Docklands Vision[218]
Grollo Tower 560 1,840 113 Mixed Use Docklands 2001 Cancelled[217]
555 Collins Street 404 1,325 82 Office City Centre 2013 Cancelled[219]
Australia 108 388 1,273 108 Mixed Use Southbank 2012 Revised[219]
Victoria Central Tower 380 1,250 80 Mixed Use City Centre Cancelled[220]
Melbourne Plaza 338 1,109 53 Office City Centre Cancelled[221]
Queensbridge Tower 308 1,010 84 Mixed Use Southbank 2011 Vision[222]
433–455 Collins Street 300 980 Mixed Use City Centre 2014 Cancelled[223]
555 Collins Street 298 978 91 Mixed Use City Centre 2014 Cancelled[224]
447 Collins Street Twin Towers 1 165 541 47 Office City Centre 2015 Cancelled[225]
447 Collins Street Twin Towers 2 165 541 47 Office City Centre 2015 Cancelled[225]

See also[edit]

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External links[edit]

Media related to Skyscrapers in Melbourne at Wikimedia Commons