List of tallest structures in Tokyo

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Skyscrapers of Shinjuku's Nishi-Shinjuku district in Tokyo
Aerial view of a city; many low-rise buildings in the foreground with many high-rise buildings in the background. The summit of a snow covered mountain can be seen in the distance.
Mid-level view of a city; the tops of trees in the foreground with many high-rise buildings in the background

Tokyo is the most populated of Japan's 47 prefectures.[1] In Tokyo, there are 45 buildings and structures that stand taller than 185 metres (607 ft).[2] The tallest structure in the prefecture is Tokyo Skytree, a lattice tower that rises 634 metres (2,080 ft), which was completed in 2012.[3] It also stands as the tallest structure in Japan, the tallest tower in the world and the 2nd-tallest freestanding structure in the world.[3][4] The tallest building and third-tallest overall structure in Tokyo is the 256-metre-tall (838 ft) Toranomon Hills, which was completed in 2014.[2][5] The prefecture's second tallest building is Midtown Tower, which rises 54 stories and 248 metres (814 ft) in height.[6] Overall, of the 25 tallest buildings and structures in Japan, 16 are in Tokyo.[4]

Skyscrapers are a relatively recent phenomenon in Japan. Due to aesthetic and engineering concerns,[7] Japan's Building Standard Law set an absolute height limit of 31 metres until 1963, when the limit was abolished in favor of a Floor Area Ratio limit.[8] Following these changes in building regulations, the Kasumigaseki Building was constructed and completed in 1968. Double the height of Japan's previous tallest building—the 17-story Hotel New Otani Tokyo—the Kasumigaseki Building is regarded as Japan's first modern high-rise building, rising 36 stories and 156 metres (512 ft) in height.[9][10] A booming post-war Japanese economy and the hosting of the 1964 Summer Olympics helped lead to a building boom in Tokyo during the 1960s and 1970s. Construction continued through the 1980s and 1990s as the Japanese asset price bubble rose and fell.[11] Mainland Tokyo is divided into two sections: Western Tokyo and the special wards of Tokyo. All of the prefecture's tallest buildings are within the 23 special wards, which comprise the area formerly incorporated as Tokyo City. Nishi-Shinjuku, a district within Shinjuku, was the prefecture's first major skyscraper development area. Starting with the construction of the Keio Plaza Hotel in the 1971, the district is now home to 11 of Tokyo's 40 tallest skyscrapers.[12]

Tokyo has been the site of many skyscraper construction projects in recent years. Since 2007, 16 buildings rising higher than 185 metres (607 ft) have been completed. As of June 2015, seven such buildings are under construction in the prefecture. Several other construction projects planned to exceed the height of 185 metres are proposed for the near future.[13]

Tallest buildings[edit]

This list ranks Tokyo skyscrapers that stand at least 185 metres (607 ft) tall, based on standard height measurement. This height includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed. Freestanding towers, guyed masts and other not habitable structures are included for comparison purposes; however, they are not ranked.

Rank Name Image Height
m (ft)
Floors Year Coordinates Ward Notes
01.0 Tokyo Skytree[A] 634 (2,080) 32 2012 Sumida
02.0 Tokyo Tower[A] 333 (1,092) 7 1958 Minato
03.01 Toranomon Hills Toranomon Hills 256 (838) 52 2014 35°40′1″N 139°44′58″E / 35.66694°N 139.74944°E / 35.66694; 139.74944 (Toranomon Hills) Minato 5th-tallest building in Japan; Tallest building completed in Japan in the 2010s[5][14][15]
04.02 Midtown Tower Ground-level view of a rectangular, glass high-rise; a smaller, circular building is in the foreground 248 (813) 54 2007 35°39′58″N 139°43′53″E / 35.66611°N 139.73139°E / 35.66611; 139.73139 (Midtown Tower) Minato 6th-tallest building in Japan; Tallest building completed in Japan in the 2000s[6][16][17]
05.03 Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1 Ground-level view of a grey, window-dotted high-rise; as the building rises, two towers break off on both sides 243 (799) 48 1991 35°41′22″N 139°41′29.5″E / 35.68944°N 139.691528°E / 35.68944; 139.691528 (Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1) Shinjuku 7th-tallest building in Japan; Tallest building completed in Tokyo in the 1990s[18][19][20]
06.04= Sunshine 60 Ground-level view of a gray, rectangular high-rise lined with columns of windows 240 (787) 60 1978 35°43′46.5″N 139°43′4″E / 35.729583°N 139.71778°E / 35.729583; 139.71778 (Sunshine 60) Toshima 8th-tallest building in Japan; Tallest building completed in Japan in the 1970s[21][22][23]
07.04= NTT Docomo Yoyogi Building Ground-level view of a brown, rectangular high-rise; as it rises, it terraces to a point and a white and an orange antenna rises from the top. A clock is located on one side of the building. 240 (787) 27 2000 35°41′3.7″N 139°42′11.7″E / 35.684361°N 139.703250°E / 35.684361; 139.703250 (NTT Docomo Yoyogi Building) Shibuya 8th-tallest building in Japan; Second tallest false clock tower in the world; Tallest building in Tokyo by pinnacle height (including antenna)[24][25][26]
08.06 Roppongi Hills Mori Tower Aerial view of a gray, oval-shaped high-rise lined with rows of windows; the facade is bisected by a smaller midsection 238 (781) 54 2003 35°39′38″N 139°43′45″E / 35.66056°N 139.72917°E / 35.66056; 139.72917 (Roppongi Hills Mori Tower) Minato 10th-tallest building in Japan[27][28][29]
09.07 Shinjuku Park Tower Aerial view of a beige high-rise lined with rows of windows; the building is composed of three adjoined towers of differing heights 235 (771) 52 1994 35°41′8″N 139°41′27.4″E / 35.68556°N 139.690944°E / 35.68556; 139.690944 (Shinjuku Park Tower) Shinjuku 11th-tallest building in Japan[30][31][32]
10.08 Tokyo Opera City Tower Mid-level view of a white, window-dotted, rectangular high-rise; the corners are cut and made of glass 234 (769) 54 1996 35°40′58″N 139°41′12.6″E / 35.68278°N 139.686833°E / 35.68278; 139.686833 (Tokyo Opera City Tower) Shinjuku 12th-tallest building in Japan[33][34][35]
11.09 Shinjuku Mitsui Building Ground-level view of a black, rectangular high-rise. its glass facades are highly reflective and the smaller facade is bisected by black, inset, crisscrossed beams 225 (738) 55 1974 35°41′30.8″N 139°41′38″E / 35.691889°N 139.69389°E / 35.691889; 139.69389 (Shinjuku Mitsui Building) Shinjuku 14th-tallest building in Japan[36][37][38]
12.010 Shinjuku Center Building Ground-level view of a brown, rectangular high-rise; the window placement creates several horizontal bands on one side and one vertical stripe on the other 223 (731) 54 1979 35°41′30.5″N 139°41′43″E / 35.691806°N 139.69528°E / 35.691806; 139.69528 (Shinjuku Center Building) Shinjuku 15th-tallest building in Japan[39][40][41]
13.011 Saint Luke's Tower Ground-level view of two blueish-grey buildings connected by an enclosed corridor near the top of the buildings 221 (724) 47 1994 35°40′1″N 139°46′43″E / 35.66694°N 139.77861°E / 35.66694; 139.77861 (Saint Luke's Tower) Chūō 16th-tallest building in Japan[42][43][44]
14.012 Shiodome City Center Ground-level view of a high-rise's green, curved, reflective glass facade; it is bisected by a vertical groove 216 (708) 43 2003 35°39′55″N 139°45′40.5″E / 35.66528°N 139.761250°E / 35.66528; 139.761250 (Shiodome City Center) Minato 17th-tallest building in Japan[45][46][47]
15.0 Marcus Island LORAN-C transmitter[A] 213 (699) 2000 Marcus Island[B]
16.013 Dentsu Building Ground-level view of a thin high-rises's curved, glass facade 213 (700) 48 2002 35°39′52.7″N 139°45′46″E / 35.664639°N 139.76278°E / 35.664639; 139.76278 (Dentsu Building) Minato 18th-tallest building in Japan[48][49][50]
17.014 Shinjuku Sumitomo Building Aerial view of a gray, triangular, window-dotted high-rise 210 (690) 52 1974 35°41′28.7″N 139°41′33″E / 35.691306°N 139.69250°E / 35.691306; 139.69250 (Shinjuku Sumitomo Building) Shinjuku 20th-tallest building in Japan[51][52][53]
18.0 Toshima Incineration Plant[A] 210 (689) 11 1999 Toshima
19.015 Shinjuku Nomura Building Ground-level view of a white, rectangular, window-dotted high-rise; one side is vertically bisected 209 (686) 50 1978 35°41′35″N 139°41′43″E / 35.69306°N 139.69528°E / 35.69306; 139.69528 (Shinjuku Nomura Building) Shinjuku 26th-tallest building in Japan[54][55][56]
20.016 Ark Hills Sengokuyama Mori Tower 207 (678) 47 2012 35°39′48″N 139°44′33″E / 35.66333°N 139.74250°E / 35.66333; 139.74250 (Ark Hills Sengokuyama Mori Tower) Minato [57][58][59]
21.017= GranTokyo North Tower Ground-level view of a glass, rectangular high-rise 205 (673) 43 2007 35°40′40.3″N 139°46′0″E / 35.677861°N 139.76667°E / 35.677861; 139.76667 (GranTokyo North Tower) Chiyoda 23rd-tallest building in Japan[60][61][62]
22.017= GranTokyo South Tower Mid-level view of a rectangular, glass high-rise; one side is vertically bisected by a section 205 (673) 42 2007 35°40′43″N 139°46′2″E / 35.67861°N 139.76722°E / 35.67861; 139.76722 (GranTokyo South Tower) Chiyoda 23rd-tallest building in Japan[63][64][65]
23.019 Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower Ground-level view of a blue, glass high-rise. Two opposite sides of the building curve inward until meeting at the top; these sides also have many white stripes haphazardly strewn across them. 204 (668) 50 2008 35°41′30″N 139°41′49″E / 35.69167°N 139.69694°E / 35.69167; 139.69694 (Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower) Shinjuku 2nd-tallest educational building in the world; 25th-tallest building in Japan[66][67][68]
24.020 Izumi Garden Tower Aerial view of a green, glass high-rise composed of square sections that rise to differing heights 201 (659) 45 2002 35°39′52″N 139°44′23″E / 35.66444°N 139.73972°E / 35.66444; 139.73972 (Izumi Garden Tower) Minato 27th-tallest building in Japan[69][70][71]
25.021= Sompo Japan Building Ground-level view of a thin, brown and white high-rise; the two wider sides curve and flair out as they near the bottom 200 (656) 43 1976 35°41′33.8″N 139°41′46″E / 35.692722°N 139.69611°E / 35.692722; 139.69611 (Sompo Japan Building) Shinjuku 28th-tallest building in Japan[72][73][74]
26.021= JP Tower Ground-level view of a blue, glass high-rise; the tower sits behind a small, white, stone, window-dotted facade 200 (656) 38 2012 35°40′46.5″N 139°45′53″E / 35.679583°N 139.76472°E / 35.679583; 139.76472 (JP Tower) Chiyoda 28th-tallest building in Japan[75][76][77]
27.021= Otemachi Tower 200 (655) 38 2013 35°41′7.5″N 139°45′56″E / 35.685417°N 139.76556°E / 35.685417; 139.76556 (Otemachi Tower) Chiyoda [78][79][80]
28.021= Yomiuri Shimbun Tokyo Headquarters 200 (656) 33 2013 35°41′7.5″N 139°45′56″E / 35.685417°N 139.76556°E / 35.685417; 139.76556 (Yomiuri Shimbun Tokyo Headquarters) Chiyoda [81][82][83]
29.025 Shin-Marunouchi Building Ground-level view of a glass, boxy high-rise; it is composed of two sections, the larger of which rises higher than the other 198 (650) 38 2007 35°40′57″N 139°45′51.7″E / 35.68250°N 139.764361°E / 35.68250; 139.764361 (Shin-Marunouchi Building) Chiyoda 32nd-tallest building in Japan[84][85][86]
31.0 Sky Tower West Tokyo 195 (640) 1989 Nishitōkyō[C]
32.026= Harumi Island Triton Square Tower X Ground-level view of a three-building complex; each building is white and blue and lined with rows of windows 195 (639) 44 2001 35°39′22.4″N 139°46′57″E / 35.656222°N 139.78250°E / 35.656222; 139.78250 (Harumi Island Triton Square Tower X) Chūō 33rd-tallest building in Japan[87][88][89]
33.026= Nihonbashi Mitsui Tower Ground-level view of a rectangular, glass high-rise; adjoining the high-rise is a stone building featuring columns 195 (639) 39 2005 35°41′13″N 139°46′22.8″E / 35.68694°N 139.773000°E / 35.68694; 139.773000 (Nihonbashi Mitsui Tower) Chūō 33rd-tallest building in Japan[90][91][92]
30.026= Sumitomo Fudosan Shinjuku Grand Tower Ground-level view of a blue and black, rectangular, glass high-rise; one facade is covered in slightly protruding vertical stripes. 195 (641) 40 2011 35°41′46″N 139°41′26″E / 35.69611°N 139.69056°E / 35.69611; 139.69056 (Sumitomo Fudosan Shinjuku Grand Tower) Shinjuku 33rd-tallest building in Japan[93][94][95]
34.029 Sanno Park Tower Ground-level view of a boxy, gray high-rise 194 (638) 44 2000 35°40′23″N 139°44′26″E / 35.67306°N 139.74056°E / 35.67306; 139.74056 (Sannō Park Tower) Chiyoda 37th-tallest building in Japan[96][97][98]
35.030 Nittele Tower Ground-level view of a blue, glass, rectangular high-rise; attached to one side of the building are two structures consisting of poles that run the height of the building 193 (633) 32 2003 35°39′52.7″N 139°45′35.6″E / 35.664639°N 139.759889°E / 35.664639; 139.759889 (Nittele Tower) Minato 40th-tallest building in Japan[99][100][101]
36.031= Mid Tower Ground-level view of two similar rectangular high-rises; each building is painted to have curved sections of color on the primarily white facades 192 (630) 58 2008 35°39′21″N 139°46′25″E / 35.65583°N 139.77361°E / 35.65583; 139.77361 (Mid Tower) Chūō 37th-tallest building in Japan[102][103][104]
37.031= Sea Tower Ground-level view of two similar rectangular high-rises; each building is painted to have curved sections of color on the primarily white facades 192 (630) 58 2008 35°39′17.6″N 139°46′29.3″E / 35.654889°N 139.774806°E / 35.654889; 139.774806 (Sea Tower) Chūō 37th-tallest building in Japan[105][106][107]
38.031= Kachidoki View Tower Ground-level view of a white, rectangular high-rise; the corners are cut and balconies form horizontal stripes up the height of the tower 192 (631) 55 2010 35°39′34″N 139°46′36″E / 35.65944°N 139.77667°E / 35.65944; 139.77667 (Kachidoki View Tower) Chūō 41st-tallest building in Japan[108][109][110]
39.034 Tomihisa Cross Comfort Tower* 191 (627) 55 2015 35°41′31″N 139°42′50.3″E / 35.69194°N 139.713972°E / 35.69194; 139.713972 (Tomihisa Cross Comfort Tower) Shinjuku [111][112][113]
40.035 Acty Shiodome Aerial view of a brown and beige, rectangular, window-dotted high-rise 190 (624) 56 2004 35°39′29.5″N 139°45′32″E / 35.658194°N 139.75889°E / 35.658194; 139.75889 (Acty Shiodome) Minato Tallest all-residential building in Tokyo; 42nd-tallest building in Japan[114][115][116]
41.036= Shinjuku I-Land Tower Ground-level view of a blue, glass, rectangular high-rise lined with rows of windows; a small circular pad sits atop the building 189 (621) 44 1995 35°41′36″N 139°41′35.5″E / 35.69333°N 139.693194°E / 35.69333; 139.693194 (Shinjuku I-Land Tower) Shinjuku 44th-tallest building in Japan[117][118][119]
42.036= Owl Tower Ground-level view of a rectangular, window-dotted high-rise; the facades are tri-colored with white, beige and gray areas 189 (621) 52 2011 35°43′39″N 139°43′11″E / 35.72750°N 139.71972°E / 35.72750; 139.71972 (Owl Tower) Toshima 44th-tallest building in Japan[120][121][122]
43.036= Brillia Tower Ikebukuro Ground-level view of a rectangular, brown high-rise; it sits on a larger base that has multi-colored panels 189 (620) 49 2015 35°43′34″N 139°42′59.7″E / 35.72611°N 139.716583°E / 35.72611; 139.716583 (Brillia Tower Ikebukuro) Toshima [123][124][125]
45.039= Atago Green Hills Mori Tower Aerial view of a glass, window-dotted high rise; the corners are cut near the top 187 (614) 42 2001 35°39′43.5″N 139°44′55.5″E / 35.662083°N 139.748750°E / 35.662083; 139.748750 (Atago Green Hills Mori Tower) Minato 46th-tallest building in Japan[126][127][128]
44.039= Capital Gate Place* 187 (614) 53 2015 35°39′50″N 139°46′59.9″E / 35.66389°N 139.783306°E / 35.66389; 139.783306 (Capital Gate Place) Chūō [129][130]
* Indicates buildings that are still under construction but have been topped out.
= Indicates buildings that have the same rank because they have the same height.

Tallest structures[edit]

This list ranks Tokyo structures that stand at least 185 metres (607 ft) tall, excluding buildings, based on standard height measurement. This height includes spires, architectural details and antenna masts.

Rank Name Image Height
m (ft)
Floors Year Coordinates Structure type Ward Notes
1 Tokyo Skytree Ground-level view of a tall, slender, gray structure 634 (2,080) 32 2012 35°42′36.5″N 139°48′39″E / 35.710139°N 139.81083°E / 35.710139; 139.81083 (Tokyo Skytree) lattice tower Sumida Tallest tower in the world[3][131][132]
2 Tokyo Tower Mid-level view of an orange and white lattice frame; the structure curves and widens near the bottom and comes to a point at the top 333 (1,092) 7 1958 35°39′31″N 139°44′44″E / 35.65861°N 139.74556°E / 35.65861; 139.74556 (Tokyo Tower) lattice tower Minato Tallest free-standing steel structure in the world; 23rd-tallest tower in the world[133][134][135]
3 Marcus Island LORAN-C transmitter An airstrip and a red and white antenna mast on a small, green, triangular island 213 (699) 2000 24°17′8.7″N 153°58′52″E / 24.285750°N 153.98111°E / 24.285750; 153.98111 (Marcus Island LORAN-C transmitter) guyed mast Marcus Island[B] Located on Marcus Island, an isolated island in the Pacific Ocean[136]
4 Toshima Incineration Plant Ground-level view of a tall, white, angular chimney rising from a brown, striped building 210 (689) 11 1999 35°44′3.6″N 139°42′50″E / 35.734333°N 139.71389°E / 35.734333; 139.71389 (Toshima Incineration Plant) chimney Toshima Tallest incinerator chimney in the world[137]
5 Sky Tower West Tokyo Ground-level view of a cluttered lattice structure 195 (640) 1989 35°44′6.5″N 139°31′22.5″E / 35.735139°N 139.522917°E / 35.735139; 139.522917 (Sky Tower Nishi-Tokyo) tower Nishitōkyō[C] Tallest structure in Western Tokyo[138]

Demolished or destroyed structures[edit]

An airstrip and a red and white antenna mast on a small, green, triangular island
The 2nd Marcus Island LORAN-C transmission mast was only half as tall as the previous mast it replaced.
Name Height
m (ft)
Year
built
Year
destroyed
Structure
type
Location Notes
1st Iwo Jima LORAN-C transmission mast 412 (1,350) 1963 1965 guyed mast Iwo Jima[D] Collapsed and replaced[139]
1st Marcus Island LORAN-C transmission mast 412 (1,350) 1964 1985 guyed mast Marcus Island Dismantled and replaced by smaller one[140]
2nd Iwo Jima LORAN-C transmission mast 412 (1,350) 1965 1993 guyed mast Iwo Jima Dismantled[141]
2nd Marcus Island LORAN-C transmission mast 213 (700) 1986 2000 guyed mast Marcus Island Dismantled and replaced[142]

Tallest under construction, approved or proposed[edit]

Under construction[edit]

This lists buildings and free-standing structures that are under construction in Tokyo and are planned to rise at least 185 metres (607 ft). Any buildings that have been topped out but are not completed are also included.

Name Height
m (ft)
Floors Year Ward Notes
Roppongi 3-chome East District Redevelopment 249 (817) 40 2016 Minato Construction started in 2013[143]
Shibuya Station New Station building East Tower 230 (755) 46 2019 Shibuya Construction started in 2013
The Park House Nishishinjuku Tower 60 209 (686) 60 2017 Shinjuku Construction started in 2014[144]
Akasaka 1-chome Redevelopment 201 (658) 37 2017 Minato Construction started in 2014[145]
Tomihisa Cross Comfort Tower* 191 (628) 55 2015 Shinjuku Construction started in 2012[111][112][146]
New Hibiya Project 191 (628) 35 2017 Chiyoda Construction started in 2015
Capital Gate Place* 187 (614) 53 2015 Chūō Construction started in 2012[147]
Tokyo Garden Terrace 180 (607) 36 2016 Chiyoda Construction started in 2013
* Indicates buildings that are still under construction but have been topped out.

Proposed[edit]

This lists buildings that are proposed for construction in Tokyo and are planned to rise at least 185 metres (607 ft).

Name Height
m (ft)
Floors Year Ward Notes
Hamamatsucho Station West Entrance District Development Block A-1 200 (656) 42 ? Minato
Hamamatsucho Station West Entrance District Development Block A-3 200 (656) 42 ? Minato
Yurakucho 1-Chome Plan 198 (650) 37 2017 Chiyoda Construction is planned to start in 2013

Vision[edit]

Name Height Floor count First proposed Year
Sky Mile tower[148] 1,700 Meters (5,577 feet) 300+ 2015 2045

Timeline of tallest buildings[edit]

A building-lined street acts as a corridor, leading directly to the grey, rectangular, window-dotted facade of a high-rise building
Built in 1968, the Kasumigaseki Building was the first modern office skyscraper in Tokyo and was the prefecture's tallest building until 1970.

This is a list of buildings that once held the title of tallest building in Tokyo. It should be noted that since its completion in 2012, Tokyo Skytree has been the tallest structure in Tokyo as well as in Japan, overtaking Tokyo Tower.

Name Years as tallest Height
m (ft)
Floors Ward Notes
Ryōunkaku 1890–1923 69 (225) 12 Taitō [149]
Old Marunouchi Building 1923–1936 33 (109) 8 Chiyoda [150]
National Diet Building 1936–1964 65 (215) 9 Chiyoda [151]
Hotel New Otani Tokyo 1964–1968 72 (237) 17 Chiyoda [9]
Kasumigaseki Building 1968–1970 156 (512) 36 Chiyoda [152]
World Trade Center Building 1970–1971 163 (533) 40 Minato [153]
Keio Plaza Hotel North Tower 1971–1974 180 (589) 47 Shinjuku [154]
Shinjuku Sumitomo Building 1974–1974 210 (690) 52 Shinjuku [51]
Shinjuku Mitsui Building 1974–1978 225 (738) 55 Shinjuku [36]
Sunshine 60 1978–1991 240 (787) 60 Toshima [21]
Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1 1991–2007 243 (799) 48 Shinjuku [18]
Midtown Tower 2007–2014 248 (813) 54 Minato [6]
Toranomon Hills 2014–present 256 (838) 52 Minato [5]

Notes[edit]

A. ^ This structure is not a habitable building but is included in this list for comparative purposes. Per a ruling by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, freestanding observation towers, chimneys or masts are not considered to be buildings, as they are not fully habitable structures.
B. ^ Marcus Island is not within the special wards of Tokyo. Administratively, the island is part of Ogasawara, Tokyo.
C. ^ Nishitōkyō is not within the special wards of Tokyo. It is one of the 30 cities, towns and villages included in Western Tokyo.
D. ^ Iwo Jima is not within the special wards of Tokyo. Administratively, the island is part of Ogasawara, Tokyo.

References[edit]

General
Specific
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