List of the first female holders of political offices in North and Central America and the Caribbean

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Anguilla[edit]

Antigua and Barbuda[edit]

The Bahamas[edit]

Barbados[edit]

Belize[edit]

Bermuda[edit]

British Virgin Islands[edit]

Canada[edit]

Ontario[edit]

Manitoba[edit]

Saskatchewan[edit]

New Brunswick[edit]

Quebec[edit]

Alberta[edit]

Nova Scotia[edit]

British Columbia[edit]

Prince Edward Island[edit]

Newfoundland and Labrador[edit]

Yukon[edit]

Northwest Territories[edit]

Nunavut[edit]

Cayman Islands[edit]

Costa Rica[edit]

Curaçao[edit]

Dominica[edit]

El Salvador[edit]

Grenada[edit]

Guatemala[edit]

Haiti[edit]

Honduras[edit]

Jamaica[edit]

Mexico[edit]

National offices[edit]

Local and municipal elected offices[edit]

State elected offices[edit]

Colima[edit]

Tlaxcala[edit]

Yucatán[edit]

Zacatecas[edit]

Federal District[edit]

Montserrat[edit]

Netherlands Antilles[edit]

Nicaragua[edit]

Panama[edit]

Puerto Rico[edit]

Saint Lucia[edit]

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines[edit]

Sint Maarten[edit]

Trinidad and Tobago[edit]


Turks and Caicos Islands[edit]

United States[edit]

Local and municipal elected offices[edit]

State elected offices[edit]

National offices[edit]

Elected[edit]

National caucus or political party[edit]

Appointed[edit]

Uruguay[edit]

Legislative Power
Municipal
National Government
Judiciary

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Carrington, Sean; Fraser, Henry (2003). "Parliament". A~Z of Barbados Heritage. Macmillan Caribbean. pp. 146–147. ISBN 0-333-92068-6. Women were not able to vote until 1943. The first women to be elected as a Member of the House of Assembly (in 1951) was Ermie Bourne (later Dame Ermie). The first women to become a Minister of Government was the Honourable Billie Miller (Minister of Health, 1975). 
  2. ^ "Madame President". Nation newspaper. March 15, 2012. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Another first". Barbados Advocate. March 15, 2012. Retrieved July 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ Guide 2 Woman Leaders
  5. ^ Royal Heraldry Society of Canada (5 February 2007). "The Coat of Arms of Canada – A Short History". Royal Heraldry Society of Canada. Retrieved 2009-01-03. 
  6. ^ "MACPHAIL, Agnes Campbell". Library of Parliament. First woman elected to the House of Commons 
  7. ^ "WILSON, The Hon. Cairine Reay". Library of Parliament. First woman Senator in Canadian history 
  8. ^ ""Today in History" profile of Barbara Hanley from the ''Sudbury Star''". Members.shaw.ca. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  9. ^ a b "Thérèse CASGRAIN". Canadian Women in politics – Hall of Fame. She led the Québec wing of the party from 1951 to 1957, thereby becoming the first woman in Canada to lead a political party 
  10. ^ "he Rt. Hon. Ellen FAIRCLOUGH". Canadian Women in politics – Hall of Fame. Ellen Loucks Fairclough was the first woman to be appointed to Canada's Cabinet 
  11. ^ Watson led the Yukon Progressive Conservative Party into the territory's first-ever partisan legislative election; although her party won the election, Watson failed to win her own seat and thus did not become government leader.
  12. ^ a b Johnston became premier by winning the leadership of the governing party, but lost the subsequent election. Callbeck was the first female premier to win the office via her party winning a general election.
  13. ^ "Kim Campbell as Prime Minister of Canada". Pm.gc.ca. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h "Some Important Women's Firsts in Manitoba". Nellie McClung Foundation. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  15. ^ http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/women/030001-1330-e.html
  16. ^ "Nunavut names new premier", The Globe and Mail, November 14, 2008.
  17. ^ "Motivational Speaker, Professional Women, Latina/Bilingual/Hispanic". Silamcalderon.com. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  18. ^ Singh, Alita (11 October 2010). "Sarah pledges to build strong foundation for new country" (PDF). The Daily Herald. p. 1. 
  19. ^ Singh, Alita (11 October 2010). "Arrindel elected president of first parliament of St. Maarten" (PDF). The Daily Herald. p. 4. 
  20. ^ a b "'10-10-10 a defining moment' Says Governor Holiday" (PDF). The Daily Herald. 11 October 2010. p. 3. 
  21. ^ "New Marcel Gumbs Cabinet takes office". The Daily Herald. 19 December 2014. Archived from the original on December 20, 2014. 
  22. ^ "New NA-led Cabinet to be sworn in today". The Daily Herald. 19 November 2015. 
  23. ^ "Audrey Jeffers". NALIS. Retrieved 2011-04-22. 
  24. ^ "History of San Fernando". What South Say. Retrieved 2011-04-22. 
  25. ^ a b "1st Independent Parliament (29 Dec 1961 – 25 Aug 1966)". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  26. ^ "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago (1991–1995)". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  27. ^ a b c "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago (1995–2000)". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2013-07-17. 
  28. ^ "Biography". NALIS. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  29. ^ "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago (2002–2007)". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  30. ^ "Office of the Ombudsman of Trinidad and Tobago". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  31. ^ a b "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  32. ^ "Navas to become first female mayor". Moontown. Retrieved 2011-04-22. 
  33. ^ "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago 2010–Present". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  34. ^ "Members of Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago 2010–Present". Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Retrieved 2011-04-21. 
  35. ^ Barber, D.A. (2003-12-04). "The New Boss". Tucson Weekly. Retrieved 2011-01-12. 
  36. ^ Women of the Hall National Women's Hall of Fame. (retrieved June 21, 2009)
  37. ^ Susana Madora Salter-First Woman Mayor (Kansas Collection-Kansas Historical Quarterlies)
  38. ^ "Nellie T. Ross". Wyoming State Archive. 
  39. ^ "Justice Sandra Day O'Connor Visits Duke Law". Duke Law School. 
  40. ^ "Vermont Women: Edna Beard". VPR. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  41. ^ a b Edna Louisa Beard. "Person Detail". Womenshistory.vermont.gov. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  42. ^ a b "Edna Beard". Vermonttoday.com. Retrieved 2013-09-07. 
  43. ^ United States Congress. "Jeannette Rankin (id: R000055)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 
  44. ^ United States Congress. "Hattie Wyatt Caraway (id: C000138)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 
  45. ^ "About Nancy Pelosi". Office of the Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
  46. ^ "Biography". Office of Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi. 
  47. ^ United States Congress. "Rebecca Latimer Felton (id: F000069)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. 
  48. ^ "Frances Perkins". Social Security Administration. 
  49. ^ "Senator Elizabeth Dole". United States Senate. 
  50. ^ "Ann M. Veneman". United States Department of Agriculture. 
  51. ^ "Gale A. Norton". United States Department of the Interior. 
  52. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Uruguayan Government Ministers". rulers.org. Retrieved 8 March 2015.