List of longest ski jumps

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Stefan Kraft has held the official world record of 253.5 m (832 ft) since 2017
Vikersundbakken in Vikersund, Norway, where the current world record stands

Ski jumping is a winter sport in which athletes compete on distance and style in a jump from a ski jumping hill. The sport has traditionally focused on a combination of style and distance, and it was therefore early seen as unimportant in many milieus to have the longest jump.[1] The International Ski Federation (Fédération Internationale de Ski; FIS) has largely been opposed to the inflation in hill sizes and setting of distance records, and no world records have been set at Olympic, World Championship, Holmenkollen Ski Festival or Four Hills Tournament events, as these have never been among the largest hills in the world.

Since 1936, when the first jump beyond 100 metres (330 ft) was made, all world records in the sport have been made in the discipline of ski flying, an offshoot of ski jumping where distance is explicitly emphasised. As of March 2017, the official world record for the longest ski jump is 253.5 m (832 ft), set by Stefan Kraft at Vikersundbakken in Vikersund, Norway. Two years prior, also in Vikersund, Dimitry Vassiliev reached 254 m (833 ft) but fell upon landing; his jump is unofficially the longest ever made.[2]

History[edit]

Ski jumping originated in Norway, and has been practiced since time immemorial, using handmade temporary hills.[3] The first record is credited to Olaf Rye, a soldier who set up a show spectated by his fellow soldiers in 1808, reaching 9.5 metres (31 ft) in Eidsberg, Norway. This small hill was probably near Eidsberg church, possibly at the farm Lekum.[4]

Sondre Norheim, credited as the 'father' of modern skiing,[5] made the second official record at 19.5 metres (64 ft) in 1868. Tim Ashburn says in his book The History of Ski Jumping that Norheim's longest jump on the circular track in Haugli ground in 1868 should have been measured at 31.5 metres (103 ft),[6] but that newspapers in Christiania reported that the length "was a little exaggerated", so the official record is everywhere written as 19.5 m.

The sport quickly spread to Finland, the United States and Canada, where some of the subsequent records were set.[7] Early jumping competitions were only scored by style, and it was seen as disruptive to attempt to jump further.[1] Not until 1901 was a scoring system for distance introduced.[8] With the construction of Bloudkova Velikanka in Planica, Yugoslavia, in 1934,[9] the separate discipline of ski flying was introduced, which is essentially an 'extreme' version of ski jumping.

With one exception, all of the world records for distance have been set on five of the world's six ski flying hills, of which five remain in use.[10] In 1936, Josef "Sepp" Bradl was the first to surpass the 100 metres (330 ft) mark, landing a jump of 101.5 metres (333 ft).[11] The FIS was long opposed to ski flying as a whole, and it has never been included in the Olympic or Nordic World Ski Championships. However, since 1972, the FIS Ski Flying World Championships has been a mainstay event, and ski flying event are also part of the FIS Ski Jumping World Cup calendar. The first to officially reach 200 metres (660 ft) was Toni Nieminen in 1994, by landing a jump of 203 metres (666 ft); at the time, ski jumpers did not receive distance points for the part of the jumps exceeding 191 metres.[12]

The distance of a ski jump is measured from the end of the 'table' (the very tip of the 'inrun' ramp) to halfway between the athletes' feet when they touch ground. To qualify, the jump must be made in a sanctioned competition, or official trial or qualification runs for these, with a system to control the actual length. To win a competition, an athlete needs both distance and style, the latter of which is achieved by attaining a proper Telemark landing; therefore jumpers are not motivated to jump as far as possible, only as far necessary to attain a good landing. Jumps are invalid if the jumper falls, defined as touching the ground with his hands or body before reaching the fall line. However, if an athlete touches the snow with any part of their body after landing, and receives style points greater than 14 from at least three judges, the jump is valid and counts as an official world record.[13]

When ski flying began in the 1930s, jumps were recorded in a traditional Scandinavian measure of length, the Danish alen (1 alen (Denmark) = 0.6277 m (2.059 ft)). Some older United States and Canadian records were recorded in feet. Now, jump length is measured by the meter. Today, camera technology capably makes the measurements. Before, spectators were stationed downhill, meter by meter, and the raised hand of the nearest observer marked the jumper's landing.[14]

Official world records[edit]

Men[edit]

Olaf Rye, who made the first recorded ski jump of 9.5 m (31 ft) in 1808
No. Date Athlete Country Hill Location Metres Yards Feet
1 22 November 1808 Olaf Rye  Norway
 Denmark
Eidsberg church Eidsberg, Norway 9.5 10.4 31
2 8 March 1868 Sondre Norheim  Norway Hauglibakken Brunkeberg, Norway 19.5 21.3 64
3 12 February 1879 Olaf Haugann  Norway Kastellbakken Oslo, Norway 20 21.9 66
4 1881 Sveinung Svalastoga  Norway Kastellbakken Oslo, Norway 22 24.1 72
5 1886 Johannes Nordgard  Norway Flatdalbakken Seljord, Norway 26 28.4 85
6 1891 Mikkjel Hemmestveit  Norway McSorley Hill Red Wing, United States 31.1 34 102
7 1893 Torjus Hemmestveit  Norway McSorley Hill Red Wing, United States 31.4 34.3 103
8 1897 Svein Solid  Norway Hegnibakken Morgedal, Norway 31.5 34.4 103
9 1899 Asbjørn Nilssen  Norway Solbergbakken Bærum, Norway 32.5 35.5 107
10 1899 Morten Hansen  Norway Solbergbakken Bærum, Norway 32.5 35.5 107
11 1900 Olaf Tandberg  Norway Solbergbakken Bærum, Norway 35.5 38.8 116
12 1902 Nils Gjestvang  Norway Gustadbakken Geithus, Norway 38.5 42.1 126
13 1902 Nils Gjestvang  Norway Gustadbakken Geithus, Norway 41 44.8 135
14 24 January 1909 Oscar Gundersen  Norway Chippewa Falls Ski Jump Chippewa Falls, United States 42.1 46 138
15 1909 Harald Smith  Norway Trampolino Campo Smith Bardonecchia, Kingdom of Italy 43 47 141
16 28 February 1909 Harald Smith  Norway Bolgenschanze Davos, Switzerland 45 49.2 148
17 19 February 1911 Anders Haugen  United States Wolverine Hill Ironwood, United States 46.3 50.6 152
18 1912 Gunnar Andersen  Norway Gustadbakken Geithus, Modum, Norway 47.5 52 156
19 16 February 1913 Ragnar Omtvedt  United States Wolverine Hill Ironwood, United States 48.2 52.7 158
20 16 February 1913 Ragnar Omtvedt  United States Wolverine Hill Ironwood, United States 51.5 56.3 169
21 2 March 1913 Thorleif Knudsen  Norway Bolgenschanze Davos, Switzerland 48 52.5 157
22 7 February 1915 Reidar Amble Ommundsen  Norway Vikkollen Mjøndalen, Norway 54 59.1 177
23 18 February 1916 Ragnar Omtvedt  United States Howelsen Hill Steamboat Springs, United States 58.5 64 192
24 1917 Henry Hall  United States Howelsen Hill Steamboat Springs, United States 61.9 67.7 203
25 1918 Henry Hall  United States Howelsen Hill Steamboat Springs, United States 62.2 68 204
26 1919 Anders Haugen  United States Haugen Hill Dillon, United States 64.9 71 213
27 29 February 1920 Anders Haugen  United States Haugen Hill Dillon, United States 65.2 71.3 214
28 1921 Henry Hall  United States Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 69.8 76.3 229
29 4 February 1925 Nels Nelsen  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 73.1 79.9 240
30 1930 Adolph Badrutt   Switzerland Bernina-Roseg-Schanze Pontresina, Switzerland 75 82 246
31 1931 Birger Ruud  Norway Odnesbakken Odnes, Norway 76.5 73.7 251
32 1931 Bronisław Czech  Poland Trampolino Gigante Corno d’Aola Ponte di Legno, Italy 79.5 86.9 261
33 24 February 1931 Sigmund Ruud  Norway Bolgenschanze Davos, Switzerland 81.5 89.1 267
34 13 March 1932 Robert Lymburne  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 82 89.7 269
35 13 March 1933 Sigmund Ruud  Norway Tremplin de Bretaye Villars, Switzerland 84 91.9 276
36 19 January 1933 Sigmund Ruud  Norway Tremplin de Bretaye Villars, Switzerland 86 94 282
37 26 February 1933 Henri Ruchet   Switzerland Tremplin de Bretaye Villars, Switzerland 87 95.1 285
38 1933 Robert Lymburne  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 87.5 95.7 287
39 25 March 1934 Birger Ruud  Norway Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 92 100.6 302
40 14 March 1935 Reidar Andersen  Norway Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 93 101.7 305
41 15 March 1935 Stanisław Marusarz  Poland Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 95 103.9 312
42 15 March 1935 Reidar Andersen  Norway Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 98 107.2 322
43 15 March 1935 Reidar Andersen  Norway Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 99 108.3 325
44 17 March 1935 Fritz Kainersdörfer   Switzerland Trampolino Gigante Corno d’Aola Ponte di Legno, Kingdom of Italy 99.5 108.8 326
45 15 March 1936 Josef Bradl  Austria Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 101.5 111 333
46 15 March 1938 Josef Bradl  Austria Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 107 117 351
47 2 March 1941 Rudi Gering  Nazi Germany Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 108 118.1 354
48 2 March 1941 Franz Mair  Nazi Germany Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 109 119.2 358
49 2 March 1941 Hans Lahr  Nazi Germany Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 111 121.4 364
50 2 March 1941 Paul Krauß  Nazi Germany Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 112 122.5 367
51 2 March 1941 Rudi Gering  Nazi Germany Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 118 129 387
52 15 March 1948 Fritz Tschannen   Switzerland Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia 120 131.2 394
53 28 February 1950 Willi Gantschnigg  Austria Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 124 135.6 407
54 2 March 1950 Sepp Weiler  Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 127 138.9 417
55 3 March 1950 Dan Netzell  Sweden Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 135 147.6 443
56 2 March 1951 Tauno Luiro  Finland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 139 152 456
57 24 February 1961 Jože Šlibar  Yugoslavia Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 141 154.2 463
58 1 March 1962 Peter Lesser  East Germany Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 141 154.2 463
59 15 February 1964 Kjell Sjöberg  Sweden Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 141 154.2 463
60 15 February 1964 Dalibor Motejlek  Czechoslovakia Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 142 155.3 466
61 18 February 1964 Nilo Zandanel  Italy Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 144 157.5 472
62 21 March 1965 Peter Lesser  East Germany Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 145 158.6 476
63 12 March 1966 Bjørn Wirkola  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 145 158.6 476
64 13 March 1966 Bjørn Wirkola  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 146 159.7 479
65 10 February 1967 Lars Grini  Norway Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 147 160.8 482
66 10 February 1967 Kjell Sjöberg  Sweden Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 148 161.8 486
67 11 February 1967 Lars Grini  Norway Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 150 164 492
68 12 March 1967 Reinhold Bachler  Austria Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 154 168.4 505
69 21 March 1969 Bjørn Wirkola  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 156 170.6 512
70 21 March 1969 Jiří Raška  Czechoslovakia Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 156 170.6 512
71 22 March 1969 Bjørn Wirkola  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 160 175 525
72 22 March 1969 Jiří Raška  Czechoslovakia Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 164 179.4 538
73 23 March 1969 Manfred Wolf  East Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 165 180.4 541
74 9 March 1973 Heinz Wossipiwo  East Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 169 184.8 554
75 15 March 1974 Walter Steiner   Switzerland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 169 184.8 554
76 4 March 1976 Geir Ove Berg  Norway Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 173 189.2 568
77 5 March 1976 Toni Innauer  Austria Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 174 190.3 571
78 5 March 1976 Falko Weißpflog  East Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 174 190.3 571
79 7 March 1976 Toni Innauer  Austria Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 176 192.5 577
80 16 March 1979 Klaus Ostwald  East Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 176 192.5 577
81 27 March 1980 Armin Kogler  Austria Čerťák Harrachov, Czechoslovakia 176 192.5 577
82 26 February 1981 Armin Kogler  Austria Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 180 196.8 591
83 19 March 1983 Pavel Ploc  Czechoslovakia Čerťák Harrachov, Czechoslovakia 181 198 594
84 16 March 1984 Matti Nykänen  Finland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 182 199 597
85 16 March 1984 Matti Nykänen  Finland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 182 199 597
86 17 March 1984 Matti Nykänen  Finland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 185 202.3 607
87 15 March 1985 Mike Holland  United States Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 186 203.4 610
88 15 March 1985 Matti Nykänen  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 187 204.5 614
89 15 March 1985 Matti Nykänen  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 191 208.9 627
90 9 March 1986 Andreas Felder  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 191 208.9 627
91 14 March 1987 Piotr Fijas  Poland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 194 212.2 636
92 17 March 1994 Martin Höllwarth  Austria Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 196 214.3 643
93 17 March 1994 Toni Nieminen  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 203 222 666
94 18 March 1994 Espen Bredesen  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 209 228.6 686
95 22 March 1997 Espen Bredesen  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 210 229.7 689
96 22 March 1997 Lasse Ottesen  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 212 231.8 696
97 19 March 1999 Martin Schmitt  Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 214.5 234.6 704
98 20 March 1999 Tommy Ingebrigtsen  Norway Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 219.5 240 720
99 16 March 2000 Thomas Hörl  Austria Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 224.5 245.5 737
100 18 March 2000 Andreas Goldberger  Austria Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 225 246.1 738
101 20 March 2003 Adam Małysz  Poland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 225 246.1 738
102 20 March 2003 Matti Hautamäki  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 227.5 248.8 746
103 22 March 2003 Matti Hautamäki  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 228.5 249.9 750
104 23 March 2003 Matti Hautamäki  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 231 252.6 758
105 20 March 2005 Tommy Ingebrigtsen  Norway Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 231 252.6 758
106 20 March 2005 Bjørn Einar Romøren  Norway Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 234.5 256.4 769
107 20 March 2005 Matti Hautamäki  Finland Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 235.5 257.5 773
108 20 March 2005 Bjørn Einar Romøren  Norway Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 239 261.4 784
109 11 February 2011 Johan Remen Evensen  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 243 265.7 797
110 11 February 2011 Johan Remen Evensen  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 246.5 269.6 809
111 14 February 2015 Peter Prevc  Slovenia Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 250 273.4 820
112 15 February 2015 Anders Fannemel  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 251.5 275 825
113 18 March 2017 Robert Johansson  Norway Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 252 275.6 827
114 18 March 2017 Stefan Kraft  Austria Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 253.5 277.2 832

* Davos (2 Mar 1913) – many regard Thorleif Knudsen 48 m (157 ft) jumps as world records, although R. Omtvedt already set a new world record of 51.5 m (169 ft) on 16 Feb 1913 in Ironwood. This is most likely due to Omtvedt jumping as a professional at that time.

Women[edit]

Daniela Iraschko-Stolz has held the women's world record of 200 m (660 ft) since 2003
No. Date Athlete Country Hill Location Metres Yards Feet
1 January 1863 Ingrid Olsdatter Vestby  Norway Nordbybakken Trysil, Norway unknown; first jump ever
2 1897 Ragna Pettersen  Norway Nydalsbakken Aker, Norway 12 13.1 39
3 1902 Hilda Stang  Norway Tranbergbakken Gjøvik, Norway 14.5 15.9 48
4 1910 Hilda Stang  Norway Tranbergbakken Gjøvik, Norway 21 23 69
5 1910 Hilda Stang  Norway Solbergbakken Bærum, Norway 22 24 72
6 1911 Paula Lamberg  Austria-Hungary Kitzbühel, Austria-Hungary 22 24 72
7 1922 Isabel Coursier  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 25.6 28 84
8 1926 Olga Balstad-Eggen  Norway Arvika, Sweden 26 28.4 85
9 February 1928 Isabel Coursier  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 31.4 34.4 103
10 18 January 1931 Johanne Kolstad  Norway Odnesbakken Odnes, Norway 46.5 50.9 153
11 17 February 1931 Johanne Kolstad  Norway Lønnbergbakken Raufoss, Norway 49 53.6 161
12 1932 Johanne Kolstad  Norway Gråkallbakken Trondheim, Norway 62 67.8 203
13 6 March 1938 Johanne Kolstad  Norway Nansen Ski Jump Berlin, United States 69.5 76 228
14 22 March 1973 Anita Wold  Norway Kløvsteinbakken Meldal, Norway 73 79.8 240
15 3 February 1974 Anita Wold  Norway Kløvsteinbakken Meldal, Norway 82.5 90.2 271
16 16 March 1974 Anita Wold  Norway MS 1970 Štrbské Pleso, Czechoslovakia 91 99.5 299
17 16 March 1974 Anita Wold  Norway MS 1970 Štrbské Pleso, Czechoslovakia 94 102.8 308
18 14 January 1975 Anita Wold  Norway Okurayama Sapporo, Japan 97.5 106.6 320
19 29 March 1981 Tiina Lehtola  Finland Rukatunturi Kuusamo, Finland 110 120.3 361
20 22 January 1989 Merete Kristiansen  Norway Odnesbakken Odnes, Norway 111 121.4 364
21 7 January 1994 Eva Ganster  Austria Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze Bischofshofen, Austria 112 122.5 367
22 7 January 1994 Eva Ganster  Austria Lysgårdsbakken Lillehammer, Norway 113.5 124.1 372
23 6 January 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze Bischofshofen, Austria 115 125.8 377
24 4 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 144 157.5 472
25 5 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 161 176.1 528
26 6 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 163 178.3 535
27 7 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 164.5 179.9 540
28 9 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 165 180.4 541
29 9 February 1997 Eva Ganster  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 167 182.6 548
30 29 January 2003 Daniela Iraschko-Stolz  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 188 205.6 617
31 29 January 2003 Daniela Iraschko-Stolz  Austria Kulm Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 200 218.7 656

Invalid world records[edit]

If an athlete touches the ground with their hands, body, or falls before reaching the outrun line, the jump is deemed invalid and thus not listed as a world record. Jumps landed during non-competition training rounds or hill tests are also not recognized as official world records. Distances set by test jumpers (Vorspringer, or "V-jumpers") during competition rounds are deemed official.

Winter[edit]

Dimitry Vassiliev has held the longest ever unofficial jump of 254 m (833 ft) since 2015
No. Date Athlete Country Hill Location Metres Yards Feet
1 28 February 1909 Trygve Smith  Norway Bolgenschanze Davos, Switzerland 48 52.5 157
2 1916 Nels Nelsen  Canada Nels Nelsen Hill Revelstoke, Canada 55.8 61 183
3 18 February 1928 Jacob Tullin Thams  Norway Olympiaschanze St. Moritz, Switzerland 73 79.8 240
4 January 1931 Alf Engen  Norway Ecker Hill Salt Lake City, USA 77.4 84.6 254
5 1931 Alf Engen  Norway Ecker Hill Salt Lake City, USA 81.1 88.7 266
6 March 1934 Sigmund Ruud  Norway Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Yugoslavia 94 102.8 308
7 1935 Alf Engen  Norway Ecker Hill Salt Lake City, USA 94.8 103.7 311
8 March 1948 Janez Polda  Yugoslavia Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Yugoslavia 120 131.2 394
9 March 1948 Charles Blum   Switzerland Bloudkova velikanka Planica, Yugoslavia 121 132.3 397
10 March 1950 Hans Eder  Austria Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 130 142.2 427
11 March 1958 Max Bolkart  Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, Germany 139 152 456
12 February 1961 Wolfgang Happle  West Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 145 158.6 476
13 March 1965 Bjørn Wirkola  Norway Kulm Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 144 157.5 472
14 March 1965 Peter Lesser  East Germany Kulm Bad Mitterndorf, Austria 147 160.8 482
15 8-9 March 1969 Ladislav Divila  Czechoslovakia Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 166 181.5 545
16 March 1973 Jochen Danneberg  East Germany Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 166 181.5 545
17 March 1973 Takao Ito  Japan Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 176 192.5 577
18 March 1973 Walter Steiner   Switzerland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 175 191.4 574
19 March 1973 Walter Steiner   Switzerland Heini-Klopfer-Skiflugschanze Oberstdorf, West Germany 179 195.8 587
20 15 March 1974 Walter Steiner   Switzerland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 177 193.6 581
21 20 March 1977 Bogdan Norčič  Yugoslavia Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 181 197.4 594
22 23 March 1991 André Kiesewetter  Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Yugoslavia 196 214.3 643
23 22 March 1992 Christof Duffner  Germany Čerťák Harrachov, Czechoslovakia 194 212.2 636
24 17 March 1994 Andreas Goldberger  Austria Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 202 220.9 663
25 18 March 1994 Christof Duffner  Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 207 226.4 679
26 22 March 1997 Dieter Thoma  Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 213 232.9 699
27 19 March 1999 Martin Schmitt  Germany Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 219 239.5 719
28 21 March 2003 Veli-Matti Lindström  Finland Velikanka bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 232.5 254.3 763
29 17 March 2005 Andreas Widhölzl  Austria Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 234.5 256.5 769
30 20 March 2005 Janne Ahonen  Finland Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 240 262.5 787
31 15 February 2015 Dmitri Vassiliev  Russia Vikersundbakken Vikersund, Norway 254 277.8 833
32 16 March 2016 Tilen Bartol  Slovenia Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 252 275.6 827
33 22 March 2018 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria Letalnica bratov Gorišek Planica, Slovenia 253.5 277.2 832

Summer[edit]

Jurij Tepeš has held the longest ever unofficial summer jump (on a plastic surface) of 154 m (505 ft) since 2018
No. Date Athlete Country Hill Location Metres Yards Feet
1 21 August 2013 Sarah Hendrickson  USA Schattenbergschanze HS137 Oberstdorf, Germany 148 161.8 486
2 11 July 2018 Jurij Tepeš  Slovenia Burabay Ski Jumps HS140 Shchuchinsk, Kazakhstan 154 168.4 505

Notes[edit]

  • Canada Revelstoke (1916) – Nels Nelsen landed a world record jump of 55.8 m (183 ft) during training; the latter is why it is officially not recognized as a world record.
  • United States Salt Lake City (Jan 1931) – Alf Engen landed a world record jump of 77.4 m (254 ft), but according to Harold "Cork" Anson this was not recognized because the Utah Ski Club, the competition organizer at the time, had not been a member of the Confederation of Western American Winter Sports Association.
  • United States Salt Lake City (1931) – Alf Engen landed a world record jump of 81.1 m (266 ft) during an unofficial event; the latter is why it is officially not recognized as a world record.
  • United States Salt Lake City (1935) – Alf Engen landed a world record jump of 94.8 m (311 ft) during training; the latter is why it is officially not recognized as a world record.

All jumps over 250 metres[edit]

As of 22 March 2018, including invalid jumps:

No. Date Athlete Country Hill Size Location Length
1 14 February 2015 Peter Prevc  Slovenia Vikersundbakken HS225 Vikersund, Norway 250 m Sport records icon NR.svg World record icon.svg
2 15 February 2015 Dimitry Vassiliev  Russia Vikersundbakken HS225 Vikersund, Norway 254 m (WR fall)
3 15 February 2015 Anders Fannemel  Norway Vikersundbakken HS225 Vikersund, Norway 251.5 m Sport records icon NR.svg World record icon.svg
4 16 March 2016 Tilen Bartol  Slovenia Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 Planica, Slovenia 252 m (test jump: WR fall)
5 18 March 2017 Robert Johansson  Norway Vikersundbakken HS225 Vikersund, Norway 252 m Sport records icon NR.svg World record icon.svg
6 18 March 2017 Stefan Kraft  Austria Vikersundbakken HS225 Vikersund, Norway 253.5 m Sport records icon NR.svg World record icon.svg
7 25 March 2017 Robert Johansson  Norway Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 Planica, Slovenia 250 m
8 25 March 2017 Stefan Kraft  Austria Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 Planica, Slovenia 251 m
9 25 March 2017 Kamil Stoch  Poland Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 Planica, Slovenia 251.5 m Sport records icon NR.svg
10 26 March 2017 Stefan Kraft  Austria Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 Planica, Slovenia 250 m
11 22 March 2018 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS240 Planica, Slovenia 253.5 m (WR fall)

Most number of jumps over 250 metres[edit]

As of 22 March 2018, including invalid jumps:

Rank Athlete Country Jumps ≥ 250 m Longest jump
1 Stefan Kraft  Austria 3 253.5 m Sport records icon NR.svg World record icon.svg
2 Robert Johansson  Norway 2 252 m Sport records icon NR.svg (f.World record icon.svg)
3 Peter Prevc  Slovenia 1 250 m Sport records icon NR.svg (f. World record icon.svg)
Anders Fannemel  Norway 1 251.5 m (f. World record icon.svg)
Kamil Stoch  Poland 1 251.5 m Sport records icon NR.svg
Dimitry Vassiliev  Russia 1 254 m (WR fall)
Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria 1 253.5 m (WR fall)
Tilen Bartol  Slovenia 1 252 m (test jump: WR fall)

Summer world records[edit]

Plastic matting for ski jumping was invented by German athlete Hans Renner. The first ski jumping tests on plastic without any audience were made on 31 October 1954 at Regenbergschanze in Zella-Mehlis, East Germany. The Wadeberg Jugendschanze K40 in Oberhof, East Germany, which was built just next to the old Thüringenschanze, officially became the world's first plastic covered ski jumping hill. On 21 November 1954 they organized first ever and at the same time regional competition on plastic at »Wadeberg Jugendschanze K40« in front of 15,000 spectators where Werner Lesser set first two ever plastic/summer world records of 41 and 42 metres (135 & 138 ft). Russian ski jumper Dimitry Vassiliev holds the current summer world record on plastic with 147.5 metres (484 ft) which he set at Russian National Championships on 15 October 2016 in Sochi, Russia.

Werner Lesser was the first to set a summer WR of 41 m (135 ft) in 1954
No. Date Athlete(s) Country Hill Location Metres Yards Feet
1 21 November 1954 Werner Lesser  East Germany Thüringenschanze K40 Oberhof, East Germany 41 44.8 135
2 21 November 1954 Werner Lesser  East Germany Thüringenschanze K40 Oberhof, East Germany 42 46 138
3 30 September 1973 Heinz Wossipiwo  East Germany Areal Horečky K90 Frenštát pod Radhoštěm, CS 84 91.9 276
4 30 September 1973 Heinz Wossipiwo  East Germany Areal Horečky K90 Frenštát pod Radhoštěm, CS 86 94 282
5 6 August 1979 Holger Greiner-Petter  East Germany Kanzlersgrund Oberhof, East Germany 97 106.1 318
6 7 August 1979 Jochen Danneberg  East Germany Kanzlersgrund Oberhof, East Germany 110 120.3 361
7 31 October 1993 Noriaki Kasai  Japan Olympic Hills K120 Hakuba, Japan 126.5 138.3 415
8 25 September 1994 Takehito Suda  Japan Olympic Hills K120 Hakuba, Japan 127 138.9 417
9 20 August 1995 Rico Meinel  Germany Granåsen K120 Trondheim, Norway 130.5 142.7 428
10 18 August 1996 Ari-Pekka Nikkola  Finland Granåsen K120 Trondheim, Norway 131 143.3 430
11 17 August 1997 Kazuyoshi Funaki  Japan Granåsen K120 Trondheim, Norway 132.5 144.9 435
12 5 September 2004 Daniel Forfang  Norway Wielka Krokiew HS134 Zakopane, Poland 139.5 152.6 458
13 2 September 2005 Petter Tande  Norway Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze HS140 Bischofshofen, Austria 142 155.3 466
14 16 August 2007 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria Trempolino a Monte HS140 Pragelato, Italy 143.5 156.9 471
15 2 September 2007 Bernhard Gruber  Austria Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze HS140 Bischofshofen, Austria 143.5 156.9 471
16 5 October 2007 Gregor Schlierenzauer  Austria Vogtland Arena HS140 Klingenthal, Germany 146 159.7 479
17 2 October 2009 Harri Olli  Finland Vogtland Arena HS140 Klingenthal, Germany 146 159.7 479
18 23 September 2011 Vegard Haukø Sklett  Norway Vogtland Arena HS140 Klingenthal, Germany 147 160.8 482
19 15 October 2016 Dimitry Vassiliev  Russia RusSki Gorki HS140 Sochi, Russia 147.5 161.3 484
20 11 July 2018 Sergey Tkachenko  Kazakhstan Burabay Ski Jumps HS140 Shchuchinsk, Kazakhstan 151 165 495

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Canadian Ski Hall of Fame. "Nels Nelsen" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 February 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2011. 
  2. ^ Eurosport (15 February 2015). "Ski jump world record broken for second time in two days as Anders Fannemel flies to glory". Archived from the original on 17 February 2015. Retrieved 15 February 2015. 
  3. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 18
  4. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 15
  5. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 21
  6. ^ (ISBN 1-904057-15-2, p. 14)
  7. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 371
  8. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 26
  9. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 70
  10. ^ Thoresen 2007, pp. 371–373
  11. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 74
  12. ^ Thoresen 2007, p. 239
  13. ^ English commentary by David Goldstrom after Kamil Stoch's first-round jump, from the Eurosport 1 broadcast in Planica on 26 March 2017
  14. ^ International Ski Federation. "Distance measurement". Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 15 February 2011. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]