List of things named after Kim Il-sung

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Kimilsungia is the namesake flower of Kim Il-sung.

Kim Il-sung was the founder and first leader of North Korea. Jane Portal, the author of Art Under Control in North Korea, assesses that: "[i]t is probably the case that Kim Il-sung [had] more buildings named after him during his lifetime than any other leader in history".[1] North Korea claims that "[m]ore than 480 streets, institutions and organizations in 100 countries were named after Kim Il Sung".[2] Since Kim Il-sung's name Il-sung (Hangul일성; Hanja日成) can mean "the Sun", many things named after him are actually called this way.[3]

List[edit]

Education and research[edit]

Museums[edit]

Streets, squares and parks[edit]

"Kim Il Sung Lane" in Damascus is one of as many as 450 streets around the world named after the North Korean president.

Awards[edit]

Other[edit]

A plaque dedicated to "Kimilsungism" at the Juche Tower

Named after the Sun[edit]

Proposed namings[edit]

  • "Kim Il-sung City" – proposed name for Pyongyang after Kim Il-sung's death. Another proposal was to name Pyongyang "Kim Jong-il City" and name Seoul "Kim Il-sung City" once reunification would be attained.[36]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Portal 2005, p. 90.
  2. ^ ""Kim Il Sung's Korea", Special Write-ups to Centenary of His Birth (27)". web.archive.org. KCNA. 13 April 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 8 October 2015.
  3. ^ a b Lim 2015, p. 88.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Lim 2015, p. 37.
  5. ^ a b c "The best North Korean schools named after Kim Il Sung" (PDF). 3 February 2014. Retrieved 8 October 2015.
  6. ^ Andrei Lankov (3 November 2008). "(260) Kim Il-sung University". koreatimes. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  7. ^ "13th Supreme People's Assembly election compilation". North Korean Economy Watch. 9 March 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2015.
  8. ^ "August Name of Kim Il Sung" (PDF). Bulletin. krld.pl. p. 2. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  9. ^ Demick, Barbara (2009). Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea. Random House Publishing Group. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-385-52961-7.
  10. ^ Lim 2015, p. 48.
  11. ^ "South Hamgyong Museum of the Revolutionary Activities of Comrade Kim Il Sung, Hamhung". Flickr. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  12. ^ "Sinuiju". Korea Konsult. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  13. ^ "South Pyongan Museum of the Revolutionary Activities of Comrade Kim Il Sung, Pyongsong". Flickr. Retrieved 31 May 2016.
  14. ^ Melvin, Curtis (15 May 2013). "North Korea's 'do it yourself' Kim Jong Un idolization campaign". NK News. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  15. ^ "BBC Monitoring Alert - DPRK". WikiLeaks. BBC. 13 February 2013. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  16. ^ "Kim Jong Il Gives Field Guidance to Different Fields in Wonsan City". KCNA. 27 April 2009. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  17. ^ "Officials of Trade Unions Start Study Tour of Mt. Paektu Area". KCNA. 10 June 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  18. ^ Kwon & Chung 2012, p. 140.
  19. ^ Suki Kim (2014). Without You, There Is No Us: My secret life teaching the sons of North Korea's elite. Ebury Publishing. p. 116. ISBN 978-1-4735-2765-2. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  20. ^ Charles K. Armstrong (2013). Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950–1992. Cornell University Press. pp. &#91, 1924&#93. ISBN 978-0-8014-6893-3.
  21. ^ Paul Moorcraft (2011). Inside the Danger Zones: Travels to Arresting Places. Biteback Publishing. p. 273. ISBN 978-1-84954-280-7. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  22. ^ Kate Mayberry (12 July 2012). "Wrestling with N Korean diplomacy – Al Jazeera Blogs". Al Jazeera Blogs. Retrieved 9 July 2015. Kate Mayberry
  23. ^ a b Elizabeth Whitman (31 August 2015). "Syria Pledges Support For North Korea, Kim Jong Un: Baath Party Praises Pyongyang For Strong Relations Amid 'Terrorism' Threats". International Business Times. Retrieved 8 October 2015.
  24. ^ Corfield, Justin (2014). "Kim Il Sung Square". Historical Dictionary of Pyongyang. Anthem Press. p. 86. ISBN 978-1-78308-341-1. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  25. ^ Michael Breen (2012). Kim Jong-Il, Revised and Updated: Kim Jong-il: North Koreas Dear Leader, Revised and Updated Edition. John Wiley & Sons. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-118-15377-2. Retrieved 4 July 2015.
  26. ^ James Hoare (2012). "International Kim Il Sung Prize". Historical Dictionary of Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Scarecrow Press. p. 181. ISBN 978-0-8108-6151-0. Retrieved 4 July 2015.
  27. ^ a b c Kim Da Seul (22 June 2012). "Kim Il Sung's Image on Medals Changed". Daily NK. Retrieved 8 October 2015.
  28. ^ a b Lim 2015, p. 38.
  29. ^ Mark Edward Harris (2007). Inside North Korea. Chronicle Books. p. 33. ISBN 978-0-8118-5751-2. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  30. ^ Ishiyama 2014, p. 145.
  31. ^ "What remains when socialism is removed from North Korea?". Daily NK. 1 September 2016. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  32. ^ "'Juche(Self-Reliance)' Ideology". KBS. Retrieved 9 July 2015.
  33. ^ Portal 2005, p. 92.
  34. ^ Portal 2005, p. 93.
  35. ^ Kwon & Chung 2012, p. 72.
  36. ^ Mok Yong Jae (12 February 2012). "Kim Jong Il's Name Set for Widespread Use". Daily NK. Retrieved 9 July 2015.

Works cited[edit]