List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries

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A map of the world. The blue area, marked "UEFA", covers continental Europe, the British Isles, Iceland, and parts of Northern Asia and the Middle East.
  UEFA countries on this map of the world's six football confederations

The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) is the administrative and controlling body for European football. It consists of 54 member associations, each of which is responsible for governing football in their respective countries.[1]

All widely recognised sovereign states located entirely within Europe are members, with the exceptions of the United Kingdom, Monaco and Vatican City. Eight states partially or entirely outside Europe are also members: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Israel, Cyprus and Turkey.[1] The United Kingdom is divided into the four separate football associations of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; each association has a separate UEFA membership. The Faroe Islands, an autonomous country of the Kingdom of Denmark, also has its own football association which is a member of UEFA.[1] The football association of Gibraltar, a British Overseas Territory, was approved as a member by UEFA in 2013.[2] Kosovo was approved as a member in 2016, even though it is claimed by Serbia and is not recognised by several other UEFA member states.

Each UEFA member has its own football league system, except Liechtenstein.[3] Clubs playing in each top-level league compete for the title as the country's club champions. Clubs also compete in the league and national cup competitions for places in the following season's UEFA club competitions, the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. Due to promotion and relegation, the clubs playing in the top-level league are different every season, except in San Marino where there is only one level.[4]

Some clubs play in a national football league other than their own country's. Where this is the case the club is noted as such.

Club name Club finished the previous season as league champions.

UEFA coefficients[edit]

The UEFA league coefficients, also known as the UEFA rankings, are used to rank the leagues of Europe, and thus determine the number of clubs from a league that will participate in UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. A country's ranking determines the number of teams competing in the season after the next; the 2009 rankings determined qualification for European competitions in the 2010–11 season.[5]

A country's ranking is calculated based on the results of its clubs in UEFA competitions over the past five seasons. Two points are awarded for each win by a club, and one for a draw. If a game goes to extra time, the result at the end of time is used to calculate ranking points; if the match goes to a penalty shootout, it is considered to be a draw for the purposes of the coefficient system. The number of points awarded to a country's clubs are added together, and then divided by the number of clubs that participated in European competitions that season. This number is then rounded to three decimal places; two and two-thirds would become 2.667.[5]

For the league coefficient the season's league coefficients for the last five seasons must be added up. In the preliminary rounds of both the Champions League and Europa League, the awarded points are halved. Bonus points for certain achievements are added to the number of points scored in a season. Bonus points are allocated for:

  • Qualifying for the Champions League group phase. (4 bonus points)
  • Reaching the second round of the Champions League. (5 bonus points)
  • Reaching the quarter, semi and final of both Champions League and Europa League. (1 bonus point)[5]

Albania[edit]

The top division of Albanian football was formed in 1930, and the inaugural title was won by SK Tirana (now known as KF Tirana). Tirana are the most successful team in the league's history, having won the competition on 24 occasions, followed by KS Dinamo Tirana (now playing in the second division) with 18 championships, and Partizani Tirana with 15.[7] The league became affiliated with UEFA in 1954.[8] Since the 2014–15 season, 10 teams compete in the division. The teams finishing in the bottom two places are relegated to the Albanian First Division and are replaced by the champions of each of that league's two groups.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Flamurtari Vlorë Vlorë
KS Korabi Peshkopi Peshkopi
FK Kukësi Kukës
KF Laçi Laç
KS Luftëtari Gjirokastër Gjirokastër
Partizani Tirana Tirana
KF Skënderbeu Korçë Korçë
KF Teuta Durrës Durrës
KF Tirana Tirana
KF Vllaznia Shkodër Shkodër

Andorra[edit]

Andorra's national league system was formed in 1993, and the Andorran Football Federation gained UEFA membership in 1996.[9] Records from the league's first three seasons are incomplete, but FC Santa Coloma have won more First Division titles than any other team.[10] Another Andorran football club, FC Andorra, play in the Spanish football league system. In recent years, eight teams have competed in the First Division. Each team plays two matches against the other seven clubs. After fourteen games, the league splits into two groups, with teams carrying their previous points totals forward. The top four teams play each other a further two times in the championship round to decide 1st–4th places, while the bottom four teams do likewise in the relegation round, to determine the 5th–8th positions. At the end of the season, the bottom-placed team is relegated, while the seventh-placed team plays a two-legged play-off against the second-placed team in the Second Division to decide which team plays in which division for the following season.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Map of Andorra and the 8 teams of the 2016–17 Primera Divisió
Escaldes-Engordany
Escaldes-Engordany
Escaldes-Engordany teams:EngordanyJenlai
Escaldes-Engordany teams:
Engordany
Jenlai
Santa Coloma teams:FC Santa ColomaUE Santa Coloma
Santa Coloma teams:
FC Santa Coloma
UE Santa Coloma
Santa Coloma
Santa Coloma
Location of teams in the 2016–17 Primera Divisió
Club Location
FC Encamp Encamp
UE Engordany Escaldes-Engordany
CE Jenlai Escaldes-Engordany
FC Lusitanos Andorra la Vella
FC Ordino Ordino
UE Sant Julià Sant Julià de Lòria
FC Santa Coloma Santa Coloma d'Andorra
UE Santa Coloma Santa Coloma d'Andorra

Armenia[edit]

Armenia gained independence in 1991, following the break-up of the Soviet Union. Organised football had been played in Armenia since 1936, as part of the Soviet football system. The Football Federation of Armenia gained UEFA affiliation in 1992, and the league ran as the national championship for the first time in the same year.[11][12] Since independence, the country's most successful team are FC Pyunik, who have won ten league titles.[11] As of the 2016-17 season, six teams compete in the Premier League. Each team plays the other six times during the season, and at the end of the ongoing season, the bottom team is relegated to the First League.[13]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams in the 2016–17 Armenian Premier League
Club Location
Alashkert FC Yerevan
FC Ararat Yerevan Yerevan
FC Banants Yerevan
FC Gandzasar Kapan
FC Pyunik Yerevan
FC Shirak Gyumri

Austria[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams in the 2016–17 Austrian Football Bundesliga
Club Location
FC Admira Wacker Mödling Maria Enzersdorf
FK Austria Wien Vienna
SV Mattersburg Mattersburg
SK Rapid Wien Vienna
FC Red Bull Salzburg Wals-Siezenheim
SC Rheindorf Altach Altach
SV Ried Ried im Innkreis
SKN St. Pölten Sankt Pölten
SK Sturm Graz Graz
Wolfsberger AC Wolfsberg

Azerbaijan[edit]

Although the country was part of the Soviet Union, the first Azerbaijan-wide football competition took place in 1928, and became an annual occurrence from 1934. Following the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991, the first independent Azeri championship took place in 1992, and the Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan gained UEFA affiliation in 1994[14][15] Since independence, the country's most successful team are PFC Neftchi Baku, with eight league titles. In recent years, 10 teams had competed in the Azerbaijan Premier League, but two teams that otherwise would have competed in the 2016–17 season were denied professional licenses, making it an eight-team league at present.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams in the 2016–17 Azerbaijan Premier League.
Team in italics is from a zone of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and is playing its home games in Baku.
Club Location
AZAL PFK Baku
Gabala FK Gabala
Kapaz PFK Ganja
Inter Baku PIK Baku
Neftchi Baku PFK Baku
Qarabağ FK Baku
Sumgayit FK Sumqayit
Zira FK Baku

Belarus[edit]

Belarus declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1990. Its independence was widely recognised within Europe in 1991, an independent national championship began in 1992, and UEFA membership followed in 1993.[16] Up to the end of the 2015 season, the most successful team is FC BATE, with 12 league championships, including an ongoing streak of 10 titles.[17] The 2016 season saw the league expand from 14 teams to 16, accomplished by promoting three clubs from the Belarusian First League and relegating only the last-place team in the 2015 Premier League. At the end of the season, the bottom team is relegated to the First League, and the 15th-placed Premier League team plays the second-placed First League team in a relegation play-off.

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Locations of teams in the 2016 Belarusian Premier League
Club Location
FC BATE Borisov Barysaw
FC Belshina Bobruisk Babruysk
FC Dinamo Brest Brest
FC Dinamo Minsk Minsk
FC Gorodeya Gorodeya
FC Granit Mikashevichi Mikashevichi
FC Isloch Minsk Raion Minsk Raion (play in Molodechno)
FC Krumkachy Minsk Minsk
FC Minsk Minsk
FC Naftan Novopolotsk Navapolatsk
FC Neman Grodno Hrodna
FC Shakhtyor Salihorsk Salihorsk
FC Slavia-Mozyr Mozyr
FC Slutsk Slutsk
FC Torpedo-BelAZ Zhodino Zhodzina
FC Vitebsk Vitebsk

Belgium[edit]

Organised football reached Belgium in the 19th century; the Royal Belgian Football Association was founded in 1895, and FC Liégeois became the country's first champions the following year. Belgium joined European football's governing body, UEFA, upon its formation in 1954.[18] Historically the country's most successful team are R.S.C. Anderlecht, with 33 league titles as of 2016.[19] The Belgian First Division A, historically known as the First Division and also known as the Pro League from 2008–09 through 2015–16, currently consists of 16 teams. Initially, each team plays the other clubs twice for a total of 30 matches. At this point, the league proceeds as follows (as of the current 2016–17 season):[20]

  • The top six teams take half of their points (rounded up) into a championship play-off, playing each other two further times to determine the national champion.
  • The teams finishing the regular season between 7th and 15th enter one of two six-team groups. The remaining teams in this competition are the top three teams from the Belgian First Division B (historically known as the Second Division), excluding that division's champion (which earns automatic promotion to First Division A). Each team plays the other five teams in its group home and away, and the winners of each group play one another in a two-legged play-off. The winner of that match advances to a two-legged play-off against the fourth- or fifth-place team (depending on results) from the championship play-off for the country's final UEFA Europa League place for the following season.
  • The bottom team on the regular-season table is automatically relegated to First Division B.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
R.S.C. Anderlecht Anderlecht
R. Charleroi S.C. Charleroi
Club Brugge KV Bruges
K.A.S. Eupen Eupen
K.R.C. Genk Genk
K.A.A. Gent Ghent
K.V. Kortrijk Kortrijk
K.S.C. Lokeren Oost-Vlaanderen Lokeren
KV Mechelen Mechelen
Royal Mouscron-Péruwelz Mouscron
K.V. Oostende Oostende
Sint-Truidense V.V. Sint-Truiden
Standard Liège Liège
Waasland-Beveren Beveren
K.V.C. Westerlo Westerlo
S.V. Zulte Waregem Waregem

Bosnia and Herzegovina[edit]

Prior to gaining independence from Yugoslavia, clubs from Bosnia and Herzegovina were eligible to compete in the Yugoslav First League, which they won three times. The country gained independence in 1992, and its Football Association gained UEFA membership in 1998.[21] Due to political tensions between Bosniaks, Bosnian Serbs and Bosnian Croats the country did not have a single national top division until the 2002–03 season, but rather two or three. Since then, Zrinjski, Široki Brijeg and Željezničar have won the title twice, while four other teams have won it once each.[22] As of 2012, the Premier League consists of 16 clubs. Each team plays the others twice; once at their own stadium, one at their opponent's. At the end of the season the bottom two clubs are relegated to either the First League of Bosnia and Herzegovina or the First League of the Republika Srpska.[23]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Club Location
FK Borac Banja Luka Banja Luka
NK Čelik Zenica Zenica
FK Drina Zvornik Zvornik
FK Mladost Velika Obarska Velika Obarska
FK Olimpic Sarajevo
FK Radnik Bijeljina Bijeljina
FK Sarajevo Sarajevo
FK Slavija Istočno Sarajevo
FK Sloboda Tuzla Tuzla
NK Široki Brijeg Široki Brijeg
NK Travnik Travnik
FK Velež Mostar Mostar
NK Vitez Vitez
HŠK Zrinjski Mostar Mostar
NK Zvijezda Gradačac Gradačac
FK Željezničar Sarajevo Sarajevo

Bulgaria[edit]

A national Bulgarian championship has been held in every year since 1924, although the 1924, 1927 and 1944 seasons were not completed. The country gained UEFA membership in 1954.[24] Historically, the most successful teams in Bulgarian football have been PFC CSKA Sofia and PFC Levski Sofia; no other team has won more than seven league titles.[25] The most recently completed 2015–16 season was intended to have 12 teams, but was reduced to 10 after four clubs (the two clubs that would otherwise have been promoted to what was then known as the A Group, plus two from the previous season's A Group) were denied professional licenses. Following that season, the Bulgarian Football Union revamped the country's professional league structure, expanding the top flight to 14 teams and changing that league's name from "A Group" to "First League".

Under the new structure that begins in 2016–17, each team plays the others twice, once at each club's stadium. At the end of the season the league splits into separate playoffs, with table points and statistics carrying over in full. The top six teams enter a championship playoff, with each team playing the others home and away. The top finisher is league champion and enters the UEFA Champions League; the second-place team earns a place in the UEFA Europa League; and the third-place team (or fourth-place team, should the winner of that season's Bulgarian Cup finish in the top three) advances to a playoff for the country's final Europa League place. The bottom eight split into two four-team groups, playing home and away within each group. The top two teams from each group enter a knockout playoff consisting of two-legged matches (note, however, that if one of these four teams is the Bulgarian Cup winner, it is withdrawn from the playoff and its opponent receives a bye into the final). The winner of this playoff then plays the third-place team in a one-off match for the final Europa League place. The bottom two clubs from each group enter an identical knockout playoff. The winner remains in the First League; the other three teams face a series of relegation playoffs that also include the second- and third-place clubs from the Second League, with places for only two of these five teams in the next season's First League.[26]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
PFC Beroe Stara Zagora Stara Zagora
PFC Botev Plovdiv Plovdiv
PFC Cherno More Varna Varna
PFC CSKA Sofia Sofia
FC Dunav Ruse Ruse
PFC Levski Sofia Sofia
FC Lokomotiv Gorna Oryahovitsa Gorna Oryahovitsa
PFC Lokomotiv Plovdiv Plovdiv
PFC Ludogorets Razgrad Razgrad
PFC Montana Montana
PFC Neftochimic Burgas Burgas
OFC Pirin Blagoevgrad Blagoevgrad
PFC Slavia Sofia Sofia
FC Vereya Stara Zagora

Croatia[edit]

National Croatian leagues were organised in 1914 and during the Second World War, but during peacetime Croatia's biggest clubs competed in the Yugoslav First League. After Croatia declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991, a national football league was formed in 1992, and the Croatian Football Federation gained UEFA membership in 1993.[27] Since its formation, the Croatian First League has been dominated by NK Dinamo Zagreb and HNK Hajduk Split; as of the end of the 2015–16 season, one of these teams has won the title in all but one of the league's 25 seasons.[28] Since the 2013–14 season, the First League has consisted of 10 teams. At the end of the season, the 10th-placed team is relegated directly to the second division, while the 9th-placed team enters a relegation play-off.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Locations of teams in 2016–17 Prva HNL
Club Location
HNK Cibalia Vinkovci
GNK Dinamo Zagreb Zagreb
HNK Hajduk Split Split
NK Inter Zaprešić Zaprešić
NK Istra 1961 Pula
NK Lokomotiva Zagreb
NK Osijek Osijek
HNK Rijeka Rijeka
NK Slaven Belupo Koprivnica
RNK Split Split

Cyprus[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Locations of the 2016–17 Cypriot First Division teams.
Club Location
AEK Larnaca F.C. Larnaca
AEL Limassol Limassol
AEZ Zakakiou Zakaki, Limassol
Anagennisi Deryneia Deryneia, Famagusta
Anorthosis Famagusta FC Larnaca
APOEL FC Nicosia
Apollon Limassol Limassol
Aris Limassol F.C. Limassol
Doxa Katokopias F.C. Peristerona, Nicosia
Ermis Aradippou Aradippou, Larnaca
Ethnikos Achna FC Achna, Famagusta
Karmiotissa Pano Polemidion Pano Polemidia, Limassol
Nea Salamis Famagusta FC Larnaca
AC Omonia Nicosia

Czech Republic[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
FC Zbrojovka Brno Brno
Bohemians 1905 Prague
FK Dukla Prague Prague
FC Hradec Králové Hradec Králové
FK Baumit Jablonec Jablonec nad Nisou
FC Vysočina Jihlava Jihlava
MFK Karviná Karviná
FC Slovan Liberec Liberec
FK Mladá Boleslav Mladá Boleslav
FC Viktoria Plzeň Plzeň
1. FK Příbram Příbram
SK Slavia Prague Prague
1. FC Slovácko Uherské Hradiště
AC Sparta Prague Prague
FK Teplice Teplice
FC Fastav Zlín Zlín

Denmark[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
AaB Fodbold Aalborg
Aarhus Gymnastikforening Aarhus
Brøndby IF Brøndby
Esbjerg fB Esbjerg
AC Horsens Horsens
F.C. København Copenhagen
Lyngby BK Lyngby
FC Midtjylland Herning
FC Nordsjælland Farum
OB Odense
Randers FC Randers
Silkeborg IF Silkeborg
SønderjyskE Haderslev
Viborg FF Viborg

England[edit]

Founded in 1888, the Football League was the world's first national football league.[29] The inaugural competition was won by Preston North End, who remained unbeaten throughout the entire season. It was the top level football league in England from its foundation until 1992, when the 22 clubs comprising the First Division resigned from the Football League to form the new FA Premier League.[29] As of the 2014–15 season the Premier League comprises 20 clubs;[30] each team plays every other team twice, with the bottom 3 clubs at the end of the season relegated to the Football League Championship. The most successful club is Manchester United, who have won the league 20 times.[31]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Greater London Premier League football clubs
Club Location Stadium Capacity
Arsenal F.C. London Emirates Stadium 60,260
A.F.C. Bournemouth Bournemouth Dean Court 11,464
Burnley F.C. Burnley Turf Moor 21,401
Chelsea F.C. London Stamford Bridge 41,798
Crystal Palace F.C. London Selhurst Park 25,073
Everton F.C. Liverpool Goodison Park 39,571
Hull City A.F.C. Hull KC Stadium 25,404
Leicester City F.C. Leicester King Power Stadium 32,312
Liverpool F.C. Liverpool Anfield 44,742
Manchester City F.C. Manchester Etihad Stadium 55,097
Manchester United F.C. Manchester Old Trafford 75,653
Middlesbrough F.C. Middlesbrough Riverside Stadium 34,742
Southampton F.C. Southampton St Mary's Stadium 32,505
Stoke City F.C. Stoke-on-Trent Bet365 Stadium 27,740
Sunderland A.F.C. Sunderland Stadium of Light 48,707
Swansea City A.F.C. Swansea, Wales Liberty Stadium 20,909
Tottenham Hotspur F.C. London White Hart Lane 36,284
Watford F.C. Watford Vicarage Road 21,500
West Bromwich Albion F.C. West Bromwich The Hawthorns 26,850
West Ham United F.C. London Olympic Stadium 60,000

Estonia[edit]

An independent Estonian league took place between 1921 and 1940. However, after the Second World War it became part of the Soviet Union, and became a regional system. Estonia regained independence after the dissolution of the USSR, organising the first national championship in 52 years in 1992, the same year that the Estonian Football Association joined UEFA.[32][33] FC Flora Tallinn is the most successful team in the modern era, with 10 league titles as of the end of the 2015 season.[32] Since 2005, the Premier Division has consisted of 10 teams, which play one another four times. At the end of the season the bottom team is relegated to the second level of Estonian football, while the ninth-placed team enters into a relegation playoff.[34]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Location of the 2016 Meistriliiga teams
Club Location Stadium Capacity
FC Flora Tallinn Tallinn A. Le Coq Arena 9,692
FC Infonet Tallinn Lasnamäe KJH Stadium 400
FC Levadia Tallinn Tallinn Kadriorg Stadium 5,000
JK Sillamäe Kalev Sillamäe Sillamäe Kalevi Stadium 800
Nõmme Kalju FC Tallinn Hiiu Stadium 300
Paide Linnameeskond Paide Paide linnastaadion 268
Pärnu Linnameeskond Pärnu Pärnu Raeküla Stadium 550
Tartu JK Tammeka Tartu Tamme Stadium 1,750
Rakvere JK Tarvas Rakvere Rakvere Stadium 1,785
JK Narva Trans Narva Kreenholm Stadium 1,065

Faroe Islands[edit]

The Faroe Islands are a constituent country of the Kingdom of Denmark, which also comprises Greenland and Denmark itself. The league was formed in 1942, and has been contested annually since, with the exception of 1944 due to a lack of available balls.[35] The Faroe Islands gained UEFA recognition in 1992.[36] The most successful teams are Havnar Bóltfelag and KÍ Klaksvík, with 22 and 17 Premier League titles respectively as of the most recently completed 2015 season. Since the 1988 season, the Premier League has consisted of 10 teams.[37] They play each other three times, with the bottom two teams relegated to the First Division.

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Location of teams in 2016 Effodeildin
Club Location
Argja Bóltfelag Argir
B36 Tórshavn Tórshavn
B68 Toftir Toftir
Havnar Bóltfelag Tórshavn
ÍF Fuglafjørður Fuglafjørður
KÍ Klaksvík Klaksvík
NSÍ Runavík Runavík
Skála ÍF Skála
TB Tvøroyri Tvøroyri
Víkingur Gøta Norðragøta

Finland[edit]

Finland's current league has been contested annually since 1898, with the exceptions of 1914 and 1943.[38] The most successful team are HJK Helsinki with 22 titles; as of 2010, no other team has won 10 or more. However, between 1920 and 1948 a rival championship operated, organised by the Finnish Workers' Sports Federation. Frequent champions in that competition before it came under the jurisdiction of the Football Association of Finland included Kullervo Helsinki, Vesa Helsinki and Tampereen Pallo-Veikot.[39] The Premier League consists of 12 teams, which play one another three times each for a total of 33 matches. At the end of the season the bottom club is relegated to the First Division.

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Location of teams in the 2016 Veikkausliiga
Club Location
HIFK Fotboll Helsinki
HJK Helsinki Helsinki
IFK Mariehamn Mariehamn
FC Ilves Tampere
FC Inter Turku Turku
Kuopion Palloseura (KuPS) Kuopio
FC Lahti Lahti
PK-35 Vantaa Vantaa
Palloseura Kemi Kings Kemi
RoPS Rovaniemi
Seinäjoen Jalkapallokerho (SJK) Seinäjoki
Vaasan Palloseura (VPS) Vaasa

France[edit]

France's first football team—Le Havre AC—formed in 1872. The first French championship was first held in 1894, but only featured teams from the capital, Paris. Between 1896 and 1912, national championships were organised by several competing federations; the first universally recognised national championship took place in the 1912–13 season. However, it only lasted two seasons; from the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, French football operated on a regional basis until 1932. A national league resumed between 1932 and 1939, and has operated annually since the conclusion of the Second World War in 1945.[40] Ligue 1 and its predecessors have featured 20 teams since the 1946–47 season. Each team plays the other nineteen sides home and away, and at the end of the season the bottom three teams are relegated to Ligue 2.[41] So far, Olympique de Marseille are the only French club to have won the UEFA Champions League, in 1993.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Angers SCO Angers
SC Bastia Bastia
FC Girondins de Bordeaux Bordeaux
Stade Malherbe Caen Caen
Dijon FCO Dijon
En Avant de Guingamp Guingamp
Lille OSC Villeneuve d'Ascq
FC Lorient Lorient
Olympique Lyonnais Décines
Olympique de Marseille Marseille
FC Metz Metz
AS Monaco Fontvieille, Monaco
Montpellier HSC Montpellier
AS Nancy Tomblaine
FC Nantes Nantes
OGC Nice Nice
Paris Saint-Germain Paris
Stade Rennais FC Rennes
AS Saint-Étienne Saint-Étienne
Toulouse FC Toulouse

Georgia[edit]

A Georgian football championship first took place in 1926, as part of the Soviet football system. The first independent championship took place in 1990, despite the fact that Georgia remained a Soviet state until 1991. Upon independence, Georgia subsequently joined UEFA and FIFA in 1992.[42]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Club Location
FC Chikhura Sachkhere Sachkhere
FC Dila Gori Gori
FC Dinamo Batumi Kobuleti
FC Dinamo Tbilisi Tbilisi
FC Guria Lanchkhuti Lanchkhuti
FC Kolkheti-1913 Poti Poti
FC Merani Martvili Martvili
FC Olimpi Rustavi Rustavi
FC Samtredia Samtredia
FC Shukura Kobuleti Kobuleti
FC Sioni Bolnisi Bolnisi
Spartaki-Tskhinvali Tbilisi Tskhinvali
FC Torpedo Kutaisi Kutaisi
FC WIT Georgia Mtskheta
FC Zestafoni Zestaponi
FC Zugdidi Zugdidi

Germany[edit]

The Bundesliga consists of 18 teams, who play each other twice, for a total of 34 matches. The teams finishing in 17th and 18th places are relegated directly to the 2. Bundesliga, while the team finishing in 16th place enters into a two-legged play-off with the team finishing 3rd in the lower division.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
FC Augsburg Augsburg
Bayer 04 Leverkusen Leverkusen
FC Bayern München Munich
Borussia Dortmund Dortmund
Borussia Mönchengladbach Mönchengladbach
SV Darmstadt 98 Darmstadt
Eintracht Frankfurt Frankfurt am Main
SC Freiburg Freiburg
Hamburger SV Hamburg
Hertha BSC Berlin
TSG Hoffenheim Sinsheim
FC Ingolstadt 04 Ingolstadt
1. FC Köln Cologne
RB Leipzig Leipzig
1. FSV Mainz 05 Mainz
FC Schalke 04 Gelsenkirchen
SV Werder Bremen Bremen
VfL Wolfsburg Wolfsburg

Gibraltar[edit]

The Gibraltar Football Association was founded in 1895, making it one of the ten oldest active football associations in the world. League football has been organized by the GFA since 1905. The first league season after Gibraltar were accepted as full members of UEFA was 2013–14, making qualification to the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League possible since the 2014–15 season, provided the relevant club has received a UEFA licence.[2] The Premier Division has consisted of 10 teams since the 2015–16 season. All league matches are held at Victoria Stadium.

Clubs as of 2016–17 season:

The stand of a football stadium, appearing to be made of concrete, in the daytime. The centre section of the stand is covered by a roof. On the front edge of the roof, the letters "VICTORIA STADIUM" can be seen.
View of the Victoria Stadium's West Stand.
Club
Europa FC
Europa Point F.C.
Gibraltar United F.C.
Glacis United F.C.
Lincoln Red Imps F.C.
Lions Gibraltar F.C.
Lynx F.C.
Manchester 62 F.C.
Mons Calpe S.C.
St Joseph's F.C.

Greece[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
AEK Athens Athens
Asteras Tripolis Tripoli
Atromitos Athens
Iraklis Thessaloniki
Kerkyra Corfu
Larissa Larissa
Levadiakos Livadeia
Olympiacos Piraeus
Panathinaikos Athens
Panetolikos Agrinio
Panionios Athens
PAOK Thessaloniki
PAS Giannina Ioannina
Platania Chanion Chania
Xanthi Xanthi
Veria Veria

Hungary[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Map of Hungary and the 12 teams of the 2016–17 Nemzeti Bajnokság I
Budapest
Budapest
Budapest teams :Ferencváros !FerencvárosHonvéd !HonvédMTK !MTKÚjpest !ÚjpestVasas !Vasas
Budapest teams :
Ferencváros
Honvéd
MTK
Újpest
Vasas
Debrecen !Debrecen
Debrecen
Videoton !Videoton
Videoton
Paks !Paks
Paks
Diósgyőr !Diósgyőr
Diósgyőr
Haladás !Haladás
Haladás
Gyirmót !Gyirmót
Gyirmót
Mezőkövesd !Mezőkövesd
Mezőkövesd
Location of teams in 2016–17 Nemzeti Bajnokság I
Map of Budapest and the city's five teams in 2016–17 Nemzeti Bajnokság I
Ferencváros !Ferencváros
Ferencváros
Honvéd !Honvéd
Honvéd
MTK !MTK
MTK
Újpest !Újpest
Újpest
Vasas !Vasas
Vasas
Location of Budapest teams
Club Location
Budapest Honvéd FC Budapest
Debreceni VSC Debrecen
Diósgyőri VTK Miskolc
Ferencvárosi TC Budapest
Gyirmót SE Győr
Mezőkövesd-Zsóry SE Mezőkövesd
MTK Budapest FC Budapest
Paksi SE Paks
Szombathelyi Haladás Szombathely
Újpest FC Budapest
Vasas SC Budapest
Videoton FC Székesfehérvár

Iceland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Club Location
Breiðablik UBK Kópavogur
Fimleikafélag Hafnarfjarðar Hafnarfjörður
Ungmennafélagið Fjölnir Reykjavík
Fylkir Reykjavík
Íþróttabandalag Akraness Akranes
Íþróttabandalag Vestmannaeyja Vestmannaeyjar
Knattspyrnufélag Reykjavíkur Reykjavík
Stjarnan Garðabær
Knattspyrnufélagið Þróttur Reykjavík
Valur Reykjavík
Knattspyrnufélagið Víkingur Reykjavík
Ungmennafélagið Víkingur Ólafsvík

Israel[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
F.C. Ironi Ashdod Ashdod
Beitar Jerusalem F.C. Jerusalem
Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv F.C. Tel Aviv
Bnei Sakhnin F.C. Sakhnin
Hapoel Be'er Sheva F.C. Beersheba
Hapoel Haifa F.C. Haifa
Hapoel Ironi Kiryat Shmona F.C. Kiryat Shmona
Hapoel Ashkelon F.C. Ashkelon
Hapoel Kfar Saba F.C. Kfar Saba
Hapoel Ra'anana A.F.C. Ra'anana
Hapoel Tel Aviv F.C. Tel Aviv
Maccabi Haifa F.C. Haifa
Maccabi Petah Tikva F.C. Petah Tikva
Maccabi Tel Aviv F.C. Tel Aviv

Italy[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Atalanta B.C. Bergamo
Bologna F.C. 1909 Bologna
Cagliari Calcio Cagliari
A.C. Chievo Verona Verona
F.C. Crotone Crotone
Empoli F.C. Empoli
ACF Fiorentina Florence
Genoa C.F.C. Genoa
F.C. Internazionale Milano Milan
Juventus F.C. Turin
S.S. Lazio Rome
A.C. Milan Milan
S.S.C. Napoli Naples
U.S. Città di Palermo Palermo
Delfino Pescara 1936 Pescara
A.S. Roma Rome
U.C. Sampdoria Genoa
U.S. Sassuolo Calcio Sassuolo
Torino F.C. Turin
Udinese Calcio Udine

Kazakhstan[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Locations of teams in the 2016 Kazakhstan Premier League
Club Location
FC Aktobe Aktobe
FC Akzhayik Oral
FC Astana Astana
FC Atyrau Atyrau
FC Irtysh Pavlodar Pavlodar
FC Kairat Almaty
FC Okzhetpes Kokshetau
FC Ordabasy Shymkent
FC Shakhter Karagandy Karagandy
FC Taraz Taraz
FC Tobol Kostanay
FC Zhetysu Taldykorgan

Kosovo[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams of the 2016–17 Football Superleague of Kosovo
Club City
KF Besa Pejë
KF Drenica Skënderaj
KF Drita Gjilan
KF Ferizaj Ferizaj
KF Feronikeli Drenas
KF Gjilani Gjilan
KF Hajvalia Hajvalia
KF Liria Prizren
KF Llapi Podujevë
KF Prishtina Prishtinë
KF Trepça Mitrovicë
KF Trepça'89 Mitrovicë

Latvia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Locations of the 2016 Latvian Higher League teams
Club Location Stadium Capicity
BFC Daugavpils Daugavpils Celtnieks Stadium 1,980
FK Jelgava Jelgava Zemgales Olimpiskais Sporta Centrs 1,560
FK Liepāja Liepaja Daugava Stadium 5,000
FS Metta/LU Riga Stadions Arkādija 500
Riga FC Riga Skonto Stadium 9,500
FK Rīgas Futbola skola Riga Stadions Arkādija 500
FK Spartaks Jūrmala Jūrmala Slokas Stadium 2,500
FK Ventspils Ventspils Ventspils Olimpiskais Stadions 3,200

Lithuania[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Locations of the 2016 A Lyga teams
Club Location
FK Atlantas Klaipėda
FK Kauno Žalgiris Kaunas
FK Lietava Jonava Jonava
FC Stumbras Kaunas
FK Sūduva Marijampolė Marijampolė
FK Trakai Trakai
FK Utenis Utena Utena
FK Žalgiris Vilnius

Luxembourg[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
FC Differdange 03 Differdange
F91 Dudelange Dudelange
CS Fola Esch Esch-sur-Alzette
FC RM Hamm Benfica Hamm
FC Jeunesse Canach Canach
Jeunesse Esch Esch-sur-Alzette
UN Käerjéng 97 Bascharage (play in Hautcharage)
US Mondorf-les-Bains Mondorf-les-Bains
CS Pétange Pétange
FC Progrès Niedercorn Niederkorn
Racing FC Union Luxembourg Luxembourg City
US Rumelange Rumelange
FC UNA Strassen Strassen
FC Victoria Rosport Rosport

Malta[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Balzan F.C. Balzan
Birkirkara F.C. Birkirkara
Floriana F.C. Floriana
Gżira United F.C. Gżira
Hamrun Spartans F.C. Ħamrun
Hibernians F.C. Paola
Mosta F.C. Mosta
Pembroke Athleta F.C. Pembroke
St. Andrews F.C. St. Andrew's
Sliema Wanderers F.C. Sliema
Tarxien Rainbows F.C. Tarxien
Valletta F.C. Valletta

Moldova[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Map of Moldova and the 10 teams of the 2016–17 National Division
Chișinău
Chișinău
Tiraspol
Tiraspol
Chișinău teams:DaciaZimbru
Chișinău teams:
Dacia
Zimbru
Tiraspol teams:Dinamo-AutoSheriff
Tiraspol teams:
Dinamo-Auto
Sheriff
Location of teams in the 2016–17 National Division
Club Location
FC Dacia Chișinău Chișinău
FC Dinamo-Auto Tiraspol Tiraspol
FC Milsami Orhei
FC Petrocub Hîncești Hîncești
FC Sheriff Tiraspol Tiraspol
Speranța Nisporeni Nisporeni
FC Spicul Chișcăreni Chișcăreni
CS Moldova-03 Ungheni Ungheni
FC Zaria Bălți Bălți
FC Zimbru Chișinău Chișinău

Montenegro[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of the 2016–17 Montenegrin First League teams
Club Location
FK Bokelj Kotor Kotor
FK Budućnost Podgorica Podgorica
FK Dečić Tuzi
OFK Grbalj Kotor
FK Iskra Danilovgrad Danilovgrad
FK Jedinstvo Bijelo Polje Bijelo Polje
FK Lovćen Cetinje
FK Mladost Podgorica Podgorica
OFK Petrovac Petrovac
FK Rudar Pljevlja
FK Sutjeska Nikšić
FK Zeta Golubovci

Netherlands[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
ADO Den Haag The Hague
AFC Ajax Amsterdam
AZ Alkmaar Alkmaar
SBV Excelsior Rotterdam
Feyenoord Rotterdam
Go Ahead Eagles Deventer
FC Groningen Groningen
SC Heerenveen Heerenveen
Heracles Almelo Almelo
NEC Nijmegen
PEC Zwolle Zwolle
PSV Eindhoven Eindhoven
Roda JC Kerkrade Kerkrade
Sparta Rotterdam Rotterdam
FC Twente Enschede
FC Utrecht Utrecht
Vitesse Arnhem
Willem II Tilburg

Northern Ireland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of the Belfast-based teams in the 2016–17 NIFL Premiership
Club Location
Ards F.C. Bangor
Ballinamallard United F.C. Ballinamallard
Ballymena United F.C. Ballymena
Carrick Rangers F.C. Carrickfergus
Cliftonville F.C. Belfast
Coleraine F.C. Coleraine
Crusaders F.C. Belfast
Dungannon Swifts F.C. Dungannon
Glenavon F.C. Lurgan
Glentoran F.C. Belfast
Linfield F.C. Belfast
Portadown F.C. Portadown

Norway[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Club Location
Aalesund Ålesund
Bodø/Glimt Bodø
Brann Bergen
Haugesund Haugesund
Lillestrøm Lillestrøm
Molde Molde
Odd Skien
Rosenborg Trondheim
Sarpsborg 08 Sarpsborg
Sogndal Sogndal
Stabæk Bærum
Start Kristiansand
Strømsgodset Drammen
Tromsø Tromsø
Vålerenga Oslo
Viking Stavanger

Poland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Arka Gdynia Gdynia
Cracovia Kraków
Górnik Łęczna Łęczna
Jagiellonia Białystok Białystok
Korona Kielce Kielce
Lech Poznań Poznań
Lechia Gdańsk Gdańsk
Legia Warszawa Warsaw
Piast Gliwice Gliwice
Pogoń Szczecin Szczecin
Ruch Chorzów Chorzów
Śląsk Wrocław Wrocław
Termalica Bruk-Bet Nieciecza Nieciecza
Wisła Kraków Kraków
Wisła Płock Płock
Zagłębie Lubin Lubin

Portugal[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams in 2016–17 Primeira Liga (Madeira)
Club Location
F.C. Arouca Arouca
C.F. Os Belenenses Lisbon
S.L. Benfica Lisbon
Boavista F.C. Porto
S.C. Braga Braga
G.D. Chaves Chaves
G.D. Estoril Estoril
C.D. Feirense Santa Maria da Feira
C.S. Marítimo Funchal
Moreirense F.C. Moreira de Cónegos
C.D. Nacional Funchal
F.C. Paços de Ferreira Paços de Ferreira
F.C. Porto Porto
Rio Ave F.C. Vila do Conde
Sporting C.P. Lisbon
C.D. Tondela Tondela
Vitória S.C. Guimarães
Vitória F.C. Setúbal

Republic of Ireland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Team Home city/suburb Stadium
Bohemians Phibsborough, Dublin Dalymount Park
Bray Wanderers Bray Carlisle Grounds
Cork City Cork Turner's Cross
Derry City Derry Brandywell Stadium
Dundalk Dundalk Oriel Park
Finn Harps Ballybofey Finn Park
Galway United Galway Eamonn Deacy Park
Longford Town Longford City Calling Stadium
Shamrock Rovers Tallaght, Dublin Tallaght Stadium
Sligo Rovers Sligo The Showgrounds
St Patrick's Athletic Inchicore, Dublin Richmond Park
Wexford Youths Crossabeg Ferrycarrig Park


Republic of Macedonia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2013–14 season:

Locations of teams participating in the 2013–14 season
Club Location
FK Bregalnica Štip
FK Gorno Lisiče Skopje
FK Gostivar Gostivar
FK Makedonija GjP Skopje
FK Metalurg Skopje
FK Napredok Kičevo
FK Pelister Bitola
FK Rabotnički Skopje
FK Renova Džepčište
FK Shkëndija Tetovo
FK Turnovo Turnovo
FK Vardar Skopje

Romania[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
FC Astra Giurgiu Giurgiu
FC Botoșani Botoșani
CFR Cluj Cluj-Napoca
CS Concordia Chiajna Chiajna
CSM Studențesc Iași Iași
CS Universitatea Craiova Craiova
FC Dinamo București Bucharest
CS Gaz Metan Mediaș Mediaș
CS Pandurii Târgu Jiu Târgu Jiu
FC Rapid București Bucharest
FC Steaua București Bucharest
ASA 2013 Târgu Mureș Târgu Mureș
FC Viitorul Constanța Constanța
FC Voluntari Voluntari

Russia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Locations of teams in the 2016–17 Russian Premier League
Club Location
FC Amkar Perm
FC Anzhi Makhachkala
FC Arsenal Tula Tula
PFC CSKA Moscow Moscow
FC Krasnodar Krasnodar
FC Krylia Sovetov Samara Samara
FC Lokomotiv Moscow Moscow
FC Orenburg Orenburg
FC Rostov Rostov-on-Don
FC Rubin Kazan
FC Spartak Moscow Moscow
FC Terek Grozny
FC Tom Tomsk
FC Ufa Ufa
FC Ural Yekaterinburg
FC Zenit Saint Petersburg Saint Petersburg

San Marino[edit]

This is a complete list of football clubs in San Marino (as San Marino has only one level domestic amateur league), apart from San Marino Calcio, the only professional Sammarinese club, which as of 2016–17 competes in Serie D, the fourth level of the Italian football league system.

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:[44]

Six men are down on one knee on a grass football field. Five men are standing behind them. The man standing on the top right is wearing a yellow top, with the letters "BROS" across his top. The other ten are wearing similar tops, but in white.
An S.S. Cosmos line-up from 2007–08.
Club Location
S.P. Cailungo Borgo Maggiore
S.S. Cosmos Serravalle
F.C. Domagnano Domagnano
S.C. Faetano Faetano
F.C. Fiorentino Fiorentino
S.S. Folgore/Falciano Serravalle
A.C. Juvenes/Dogana Serravalle
S.P. La Fiorita Montegiardino
A.C. Libertas Borgo Maggiore
S.S. Murata San Marino
S.S. Pennarossa Chiesanuova
S.S. San Giovanni Borgo Maggiore
S.P. Tre Fiori Fiorentino
S.P. Tre Penne Serravalle
S.S. Virtus Acquaviva

Scotland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Aberdeen F.C. Aberdeen
Celtic F.C. Glasgow
Dundee F.C. Dundee
Hamilton Academical F.C. Hamilton
Heart of Midlothian F.C. Edinburgh
Inverness Caledonian Thistle F.C. Inverness
Kilmarnock F.C. Kilmarnock
Motherwell F.C. Motherwell
Partick Thistle F.C. Glasgow
Rangers F.C. Glasgow
Ross County F.C. Dingwall
St Johnstone F.C. Perth

Serbia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Club Location
FK Borac Čačak Čačak
FK Crvena Zvezda Belgrade
FK Čukarički Belgrade
FK Donji Srem Pećinci
FK Jagodina Jagodina
FK Mladost Lučani Lučani
FK Napredak Kruševac Kruševac
FK Novi Pazar Novi Pazar
OFK Beograd Belgrade
FK Partizan Belgrade
FK Rad Belgrade
FK Radnički 1923 Kragujevac
FK Radnički Niš Niš
FK Spartak Subotica Subotica
FK Vojvodina Novi Sad
FK Voždovac Belgrade

Slovakia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Club Location
FK AS Trenčín Trenčín
FK DAC 1904 Dunajská Streda Dunajská Streda
FK Dukla Banská Bystrica Banská Bystrica
MFK Košice Košice
ŽP Šport Podbrezová Podbrezová
MFK Ružomberok Ružomberok
FK Senica Senica
ŠK Slovan Bratislava Bratislava
Spartak Myjava Myjava
FC Spartak Trnava Trnava
MŠK Žilina Žilina
FC ViOn Zlaté Moravce Zlaté Moravce

Slovenia[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Location of teams in the 2014–15 Slovenian PrvaLiga
Club Location
NK Celje Celje
NK Domžale Domžale
ND Gorica Nova Gorica
FC Koper Koper
NK Krka Novo Mesto
NK Maribor Maribor
NK Olimpija Ljubljana
NK Radomlje Radomlje
NK Rudar Velenje Velenje
NK Zavrč Zavrč

Spain[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of teams in 2016–17 La Liga (Canary Islands)
Club Location
Deportivo Alavés Vitoria-Gasteiz
Athletic Club Bilbao
Atlético de Madrid Madrid
FC Barcelona Barcelona
Real Betis Balompié Seville
RC Celta de Vigo Vigo
RC Deportivo de La Coruña A Coruña
SD Eibar Eibar
RCD Espanyol Cornellà de Llobregat
Granada CF Granada
UD Las Palmas Las Palmas
CD Leganés Leganés
Málaga CF Málaga
CA Osasuna Pamplona
Real Madrid C.F. Madrid
Real Sociedad San Sebastián
Sevilla FC Seville
Real Sporting de Gijón Gijón
Valencia CF Valencia
Villarreal CF Vila-real

Sweden[edit]

A Swedish championship was first organised in 1896, and the champions were decided by a knockout cup format until 1925, when Allsvenskan was formed.[45] Sweden was one of the founding members of UEFA in 1954.[46] As of the most recently completed 2015 season, IFK Göteborg and Malmö FF have won the most national titles with 18 each, followed by IFK Norrköping with 13. However, Malmö have the most league titles, with 21 to 13 for both IFK Götebörg and IFK Norrköping. Since 2008,[47] 16 teams compete in Allsvenskan. They each play one another home and away, for a total of 30 games. The bottom two teams are relegated to the Superettan (The Super One), and the 14th-placed Allsvenskan team enters into a relegation playoff with the 3rd-placed Superettan team to decide which will play in Allsvenskan for the following season.[48]

Clubs and locations as of 2016 season:

Club Location
AIK Stockholm
Djurgårdens IF Stockholm
IF Elfsborg Borås
Falkenbergs FF Falkenberg
Gefle IF Gävle
GIF Sundsvall Sundsvall
IFK Göteborg Gothenburg
BK Häcken Gothenburg
Hammarby IF Stockholm
Helsingborgs IF Helsingborg
Jönköpings Södra IF Jönköping
Kalmar FF Kalmar
Malmö FF Malmö
IFK Norrköping Norrköping
Örebro SK Örebro
Östersunds FK Östersunds

Switzerland[edit]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Location of the 2016–17 Swiss Super League teams
Club Location
FC Basel Basel
Grasshopper Club Zürich Zurich
FC Lausanne-Sport Lausanne
FC Lugano Lugano
FC Luzern Lucerne
FC Sion Sion
FC St. Gallen St. Gallen
FC Thun Thun
FC Vaduz Vaduz, Liechtenstein
BSC Young Boys Bern

Turkey[edit]

Turkish football operated on a regional basis until the 1950s. A national knockout tournament took place in 1957 and 1958, to decide European qualification. The Turkish Football Federation retrospectively recognised these tournaments as deciding the Turkish champions; both competitions were won by Beşiktaş J.K.[49] A national league was formed in 1959, and has been held annually from then onwards.[49] Since the formation of a national league, the most successful teams are Galatasaray and Fenerbahçe, with 20 and 19 league titles respectively as of the most recently completed 2015–16 season. Currently, 18 teams compete in the Süper Lig. Each team plays the other teams home and away, with the bottom three teams relegated to the TFF First League for the following season.[50]

Clubs and locations as of 2016-17 season:

Istanbul Süper Lig football clubs
Team Home city Stadium Capacity
Adanaspor Adana KozArena 36,117
Akhisar Belediyespor Manisa Manisa 19 Mayıs Stadium 16,597
Alanyaspor Antalya Alanya Oba Stadium 15,000
Antalyaspor Antalya New Antalya Stadium 33,032
Beşiktaş İstanbul Vodafone Arena 41,903
Bursaspor Bursa Timsah Arena 45,000
Çaykur Rizespor Rize Yeni Rize Şehir Stadı 15,485
Fenerbahçe İstanbul Şükrü Saracoğlu Stadium 50,509
Galatasaray İstanbul Türk Telekom Arena 52,652
Gaziantepspor Gaziantep Kamil Ocak Stadium 16,981
Gençlerbirliği Ankara Ankara 19 Mayıs Stadium 19,209
İstanbul Başakşehir İstanbul Başakşehir Arena 17,800
Karabükspor Karabük Dr. Necmettin Şeyhoğlu Stadium 14,200
Kasımpaşa İstanbul Recep Tayyip Erdoğan Stadium 14,234
Kayserispor Kayseri Kadir Has Stadium 32,864
Torku Konyaspor Konya Torku Arena 42,276
Osmanlıspor Ankara Yenikent Asaş Stadium 20,000
Trabzonspor Trabzon Hüseyin Avni Aker Stadium 24,169

Ukraine[edit]

As a member of the Soviet Union, Ukraine's league operated as a feeder to the national Soviet leagues, meaning that until 1992 the strongest Ukrainian teams did not take part.[52] The Football Federation of Ukraine was formed shortly after the country achieved independence in 1991, and gained UEFA membership the following year.[53] Since the formation of a national league, FC Dynamo Kyiv have won thirteen titles, FC Shakhtar Donetsk five, and SC Tavriya Simferopol one, as of the completed 2009–10 season.[52] Currently, 16 teams compete in the Premier League. They play one another twice, and at the end of the season the bottom two teams are relegated to the Ukrainian First League.[54]

Clubs and locations as of 2014–15 season:

Locations of team home grounds in the 2013–14 Ukrainian Premier League
Club Location
FC Chornomorets Odesa Odesa
FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Dnipropetrovsk
FC Dynamo Kyiv Kyiv
FC Hoverla Uzhhorod Uzhhorod
FC Illychivets Mariupol Mariupol
FC Karpaty Lviv Lviv
FC Metalist Kharkiv Kharkiv
FC Metalurh Donetsk Donetsk
FC Olimpik Donetsk Donetsk
FC Metalurh Zaporizhya Zaporizhia
FC Shakhtar Donetsk Donetsk
FC Volyn Lutsk Lutsk
FC Vorskla Poltava Poltava
FC Zorya Luhansk Luhansk

Wales[edit]

Although Wales joined UEFA in 1954, Welsh football operated on a regional basis until 1992, with no national championship.[55][56] Several Welsh clubs play not in the Welsh football league system, but in the English football league system. Currently, one Welsh club, Swansea City, competes in the Premier League. Another Welsh club, Cardiff City, was relegated to the second level, the Football League Championship, at the end of the 2013–14 season. Four other Welsh clubs participate lower down the English football league system: Newport County A.F.C., Wrexham F.C., Colwyn Bay F.C. and Merthyr Town F.C.. Despite competing in Football Association competitions, the latter four are under the jurisdiction of the Football Association of Wales.[57] Until 2011 Swansea City and Cardiff City had similar arrangements with the FAW but are now under the jurisdiction of The Football Association.[58] The most successful Welsh club since the formation of the Welsh Premier League is The New Saints, with 8 league titles.[56] As of 2014–15, 12 teams compete in the Welsh Premier league. Relegation to and promotion from lower regional leagues is in part dictated by whether or not clubs can obtain a Premier League licence; only clubs able to obtain a licence are eligible for promotion, and clubs which fail to obtain one are relegated regardless of their final league position.[59]

Clubs and locations as of 2016–17 season:

Club Location
Aberystwyth Town F.C. Aberystwyth
Airbus UK Broughton F.C. Broughton
Bala Town F.C. Bala
Bangor City F.C. Bangor
Cardiff Metropolitan University F.C. Cardiff
Carmarthen Town A.F.C. Carmarthen
Cefn Druids A.F.C. Wrexham
Connah's Quay Nomads F.C. Connah's Quay
Llandudno F.C. Llandudno
Newtown A.F.C. Newtown
Rhyl F.C. Rhyl
The New Saints F.C. Oswestry, England[W 1]
  1. ^ In 2003, Total Network Solutions F.C., representing Llansantffraid, merged with Oswestry Town F.C., an English club that had historically played in the Welsh football structure. The merged club, which became The New Saints in 2006, played in Llansantffraid until moving to a ground in Oswestry starting with the 2007–08 season. The two communities are 8 miles/13 km apart.[60]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ornstein, David (8 December 2008). "Big four to feel wind of European change". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Gibraltar named 54th member of UEFA". UEFA. 24 May 2013. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "Liechtenstein making strides". UEFA. 21 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010. 
  4. ^ "Solid foundations bolster San Marino". UEFA. 21 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c "Regulations of the UEFA Champions League 2010/11" (PDF). UEFA. pp. 41–48. Retrieved 16 August 2010. 
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