List of torpedo boat classes of the Royal Navy

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This is a list of torpedo boat classes of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, organised chronologically by entry into service.

Torpedo boats[edit]

Ever since the first spar-torpedoes in the American Civil War and the Russian Turkish War, the world's sea powers continued to refine the small torpedo craft concept to employ the new automobile torpedoes so they could continue the legacy as small and cheap vessels able to challenge much larger vessels. The Royal Navy purchased 1st and 2nd class torpedo boats for offensive and defensive combat roles, respectively.

Later – especially against the French automobile defense – the British primarily ordered torpedo boat catchers and torpedo gun boats, in the final torpedo boat destroyers (TBD) or destroyers.

1st class torpedo boats[edit]

First class torpedo boats were designed for independent inshore operations. They were small, but large enough to patrol coastal waters and enjoy some limited endurance beyond their supporting port or tender.

Lightning-design[edit]

113-Footers[edit]

  • Des Vignes, Chertsey
    • No. 21 – not accepted from RN because of lack of performance
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 21 - No. 22
  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 23 - No. 24

125-Footers[edit]

  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 25
    • No. 26 - No. 29
    • No. 41 - No. 60
  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 30 - No. 33
    • No. 61 - No. 78
    • No. 79
  • J. Samuel White
    • No. 34 - No. 38

Larger boats and purchases[edit]

  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 39 - No. 40
    • No. 80
  • J. Samuel White
    • No. 81 (Swift)
  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 82 - No. 87

140-Footers[edit]

  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 88 - No. 89
    • No. 90
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 91 - No. 92
    • No. 93
  • J. Samuel White
    • No. 94 - No. 96
  • Laird Brothers, Birkenhead
    • No. 97
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 100
    • No. 102 - No. 103
  • Hanna, Donald & Wilson
    • No. 101
  • J. Samuel White
    • No. 104 - No. 106

160-Footers[edit]

  • TB.98 class
TB.98 class
Class overview
Builders: Thornycroft
Completed: 4
Lost: 4
Scrapped: 4
General characteristics [1]
Displacement:
  • 185 long tons (188 t) normal
  • 199 long tons (202 t) deep load
Length: 160 ft (48.77 m) pp
Beam: 17 ft 0 in (5.18 m)
Draught: 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Propulsion: 3,000 ihp (2,200 kW)
Speed: 25 kn (46 km/h; 29 mph)
Armament:
Number Builder Launched[2] Notes[2]
TB.98 Thornycroft 22 January 1901 Sold for scrap 30 June 1920
TB.99 Thornycroft 1901 Sank 1907 but salvaged and returned to service[3]
Sold for scrap 29 July 1920
TB.107 Thornycroft 1901 Sold for scrap 29 July 1920
TB.108 Thornycroft 30 August 1901 Sold for scrap 29 July 1920
  • TB.109 class
Number Builder[4] Launched[4] Notes[4]
TB.109 Thornycroft 22 July 1902 Sold for scrap 27 March 1920
TB.110 Thornycroft 5 September 1902 Sold for scrap 27 March 1920
TB.111 Thornycroft 31 October 1902 Sold for scrap 10 February 1920
TB.112 Thornycroft 15 January 1903 Sold for scrap 10 February 1920
TB.113 Thornycroft 12 February 1903 Sold for scrap 19 December 1919
  • TB.114 class
TB.114 class
Class overview
Builders: J S White
Completed: 4
Lost: 1
Scrapped: 3
General characteristics [1]
Displacement: 205 long tons (208 t)
Length: 165 ft (50.29 m) pp
Beam: 17 ft 6 in (5.33 m)
Draught: 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Propulsion: 2,900 ihp (2,200 kW)
Speed: 25 kn (46 km/h; 29 mph)
Armament:
Number Builder[4] Launched[4] Notes[4]
TB.114 J S White 8 June 1903 Sold for scrap 1919
TB.115 J S White 19 November 1903 Sold for scrap 1919
TB.116 J S White 21 December 1903 Sold for scrap 22 October 1921
TB.117 J S White 18 February 1904 Sunk following collision with merchant vessel Kamourska in English Channel 10 June 1917
3 killed[5]

2nd class torpedo boats[edit]

The first 50 small torpedo boats were to be carried on larger ships or given to dedicated torpedo boat carriers, such as HMS Vulcan and HMS Hecla. The later boats were designed as harbour defence ships and coastal boats, but their small size meant their endurance and seakeeping abilities would be quite modest.

  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 51 - No. 62
  • Herreshoff Manufacturing Company, Bristol RI
    • No. 63
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 64 - No. 73
  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 74, No. 75
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 76 - No. 95
  • Yarrow & Company, Limited
    • No. 96, No. 97
  • John I. Thornycroft & Company
    • No. 98
    • No. 99, No. 100

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Friedman 2009, p. 289.
  2. ^ a b Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 79.
  3. ^ Chesneau and Kolesnik 1979, p. 104.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 80.
  5. ^ Kindell, Don. "1st - 30th JUNE 1917: in date, ship/unit & name order". World War 1 - Casualty Lists of the Royal Navy and Dominion Navies. naval-history.net. Retrieved 22 April 2014. 
  • Chesneau, Roger and Kolesnik, Eugene (Ed.) Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, 1860–1905. Conway Maritime Press, 1979. ISBN 0-8317-0302-4
  • Dittmar, F.J. and Colledge, J.J. British Warships 1914–1919. London: Ian Allen, 1972. ISBN 0-7110-0380-7.
  • Friedman, Norman. British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing, 2009. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9.