List of transistorized computers

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This is a list of transistorized computers, which were digital computers that used discrete transistors as their primary logic elements. Discrete transistors were a feature of logic design for computers from about 1960, when reliable transistors became economically available, until monolithic integrated circuits displaced them in the 1970s. The list is organized by operational date or delivery year to customers. Computers announced, but never completed, are not included. Some very early "transistor" computers may still have included vacuum tubes in the power supply or for auxiliary functions.

1950s[edit]

Harwell CADET
1953
1954
  • Bell Labs TRADIC for U.S. Air Force
1955
  • Harwell CADET demonstrated February 1955, one-off scientific computer
1956
1957
  • Burroughs SM-65 Atlas ICBM Guidance Computer MOD1, AN/GSQ-33 (no relation to Manchester ATLAS)
  • Ramo-Wooldridge (TRW) RW-30 airborne computer[5][6]
  • Univac TRANSTEC,[7] for US Navy
  • Univac ATHENA, US Air Force missile guidance (ground control)
  • IBM 608 transistor calculator (its development was preceded by the prototyping of an experimental all-transistor version of the 604 demonstrated in October 1954), announced 1955, first shipped Dec 1957
1958
Philco 2000
NCR 304
1959
IBM 1401

1960s[edit]

UNIVAC LARC
1960
1961
IBM 7030
1962
ICT 1301
1963
CDC 3800
PDP-6
1964
SDS 930
1965
NCR 315
1966
1967
CDC 6400
1968
  • PDP-10 (first model only - later versions used ICs)
  • SDS 945
  • BESM-6 (first model only - later versions used ICs)
  • Moscow Power Engineering Institute M-54

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fransman, Martin (1993-02-25). The Market and Beyond: Cooperation and Competition in Information Technology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19–20. ISBN 9780521435253. 
  2. ^ Early Computers, Information Processing Society of Japan
  3. ^ 【Electrotechnical Laboratory】 ETL Mark III Transistor-Based Computer, Information Processing Society of Japan
  4. ^ Early Computers: Brief History, Information Processing Society of Japan
  5. ^ Grabbe, E. M. (February 7, 1957), "The Ramo- Wooldridge Corporation" (PDF), SOME RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS, Instrumentation and Control in the Process Industries Conference, Chicago, p. 5 
  6. ^ "The Michigan Technic". LXXVI (4). UM Libraries. January 1958: 61. 
  7. ^ Boslaugh, David L. (2003). When Computers Went to Sea: The Digitization of the United States Navy. John Wiley & Sons. p. 113. ISBN 9780471472209. 
  8. ^ Saul Rosen (Jun 1991). PHILCO: Some Recollections of the PHILCO TRANSAC S-2000 (Computer Science Technical Reports / Purdue e-Pubs). Purdue University.  Here: page 2
  9. ^ "COMPUTERS AND CENTERS, OVERSEAS: 10. Siemens & Halske AG, Siemens 2002, Munich, Germany". DIGITAL COMPUTER NEWSLETTER. 11 (2): 19–23. Apr 1959. 
  10. ^ "COMPUTERS AND CENTERS, OVERSEAS: 10. Siemens & Halske AG, Siemens 2002, Munich, Germany". DIGITAL COMPUTER NEWSLETTER. 12 (1): 19–20. Jan 1960. 
  11. ^ [1] RW-300 page 0841
  12. ^ . 196003.pdf. "REFERENCE INFORMATION: A Survey of European Digital Computers, Part 2". Computers and Automation. 9 (3): 28–29. Mar 1960. 
  13. ^ "COMPUTERS AND CENTERS, OVERSEAS: 1. Standard Elektrik Lorenz AG, ER 56, Stuttgart, Germany". DIGITAL COMPUTER NEWSLETTER. 12 (2): 13–14. Apr 1960. 
  14. ^ Weik, Martin H. (Mar 1961). "DE-60". ed-thelen.org. A Third Survey of Domestic Electronic Digital Computing Systems. 
  15. ^ "The Retro-Computing Society of RI, Inc". www.rcsri.org. 
  16. ^ Weik, Martin H. (Mar 1961). "PACKARD BELL 250". ed-thelen.org. A Third Survey of Domestic Electronic Digital Computing Systems. 
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-09-30. Retrieved 2011-10-19.  AN/UYK-1
  18. ^ [2] RW-400 at Bitsavers
  19. ^ Culler, Glen; Huff, Robert (1962), "Managing Requirements Knowledge, International Workshop on", Solution of Non-Linear Integral Equations Using on-Line Computer Control, Proceedings of the Spring Joint Computer Conference, San Francisco, pp. 129–138 
  20. ^ trw :: BR-133 Brochure May64. May 1964. 
  21. ^ [3] AN/UYK-3
  22. ^ Jones, Douglas W. "The PDP-8". THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Department of Computer Science. Retrieved May 30, 2018. 
  23. ^ a b "Solid Logic Technology: Versatile, High-Performance Microelectronics". IBM JRD. IBM. April 1964. A new microelectronics technique called Solid Logic Technology, or SLT, is utilized in the new family of IBM/360 computers. This new technology provides a hybrid, integrated circuit module which combines discrete, glass-encapsulated silicon transistors and diodes with stencil-screened land patterns and precision passive components.