List of unnamed tropical cyclones

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The list of unnamed tropical cyclones since naming began includes all tropical cyclones that met the criteria for naming in a basin, but that for whatever reason, did not receive a name. These systems have occurred in all basins and for various reasons.

Scope, reasons, and naming overview[edit]

In order to ease communications and advisories,[1] tropical cyclones are named when, according to the appropriate Regional Specialized Meteorological Center or Tropical Cyclone Warning Center, it has reached tropical storm status. A tropical cyclone with winds of tropical storm intensity or higher goes unnamed when operationally, it is not considered to have met the criteria for naming. Reasons for this include:

North Atlantic Ocean[edit]

Only unnamed subtropical cyclones that could have been named are included. This excludes several that existed, but that were unnamed because subtropical cyclones were not named when they existed.

The unnamed hurricane or "Perfect Storm" of 1991

Naming has been used since the 1950 season.

Eastern and central north Pacific Ocean[edit]

The unnamed tropical storm in 1996

Naming began in 1960. Before 1957, a few systems in the central Pacific basin were given names, generally in an ad hoc manner.

Western north Pacific Ocean[edit]

The unnamed tropical storm in 1995

The official practice of tropical cyclone naming started in 1945 within the Western Pacific.[13][14] Due to differences in wind speed criteria between the Japan Meteorological Agency and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, a system will sometimes be considered a tropical storm by the JTWC but only a depression by the JMA, or vice versa. This results in several apparent unnamed systems. Prior to 2000, the JTWC was responsible for tropical cyclone naming, with the JMA assuming responsibility for naming from 2000 and beyond. Due to this, "unnamed tropical cyclones" that met the JMA's tropical storm criteria but not those of the JTWC prior to 2000 are excluded. Likewise, "unnamed tropical cyclones" that met the JTWC's tropical storm criteria but not those of the JMA from 2000 and beyond are also excluded.

North Indian Ocean[edit]

Due to differences in wind speed criteria between the India Meteorological Department and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, a system will sometimes be considered a tropical storm by the JTWC but only a depression by the IMD. This results in several apparent unnamed systems. Because the IMD is responsible for naming, "unnamed tropical cyclones" that met the JTWC's tropical storm criteria but not those of the IMD are excluded.

Naming has taken place since mid-2003.

There have been no unnamed tropical cyclones using the India Meteorological Department's criteria. One system, 2007's Yemyin, was upgraded after the fact and retroactively named.[15]

South-west Indian Ocean[edit]

The unnamed subtropical storm from the 2006–07 season

Tropical cyclones have been named within this basin since 1960, with any tropical depression or subtropical depression that RSMC La Réunion analyze as having 10-minute sustained windspeeds of at least 65 km/h, 40 mph is named. However unlike other basins RSMC La Réunion do not name tropical depressions, however as they delegate the rights to name tropical cyclones to the Subregional tropical cyclone warning centers in Mauritius or Madagascar depending on whether it is east or west of the 55th meridian east.

Australian region[edit]

The unnamed cyclone of the 2002–03 season

South Pacific[edit]

  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1971–72 – December 1971
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1971–72 – January 1972
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1973–74 – November 1973
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1976–77 – February 1977 (1)
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1976–77 – February 1977 (2)
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1980–81 – February 1981
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1980–81 – February/March 1981
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1980–81 – March 1981
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1983–84 – February 1984
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1983–84 – March 1984
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1984–85 – December 1985
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1986–87 – March 1987
  • Unnamed Tropical Cyclone 1988–89 – February 1989
  • Unnamed tropical cyclone 1990–91 – December 1990
  • Tropical Cyclone 29P could not be named during February 1997 as it had developed into a tropical cyclone within the subtropic region of the Southern Pacific.[4][5]

References[edit]

Unless otherwise indicated, all storms come from the following datasets from the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center:

  • Atlantic: [19]
  • Western north Pacific: "RSMC Best Track Data (Text)". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 2013-06-25. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
  • Northern Indian, western north Pacific, Southern Hemisphere: "JTWC Tropical Cyclone Best Track Data Site". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 2007-08-09. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  • Southwestern Indian Ocean: "Untitled". Météo-France. Archived from the original on 2008-04-21. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
  1. ^ Christopher Landsea. "Subject: B1) How are tropical cyclones named?" (FAQ). Retrieved 2008-05-05.
  2. ^ Jack Beven & Eric S. Blake (2006-04-10). "Unnamed Subtropical Storm" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-05-05.
  3. ^ "1995 Annual Tropical Cyclone Report" (PDF). Joint Typhoon Warning Center.
  4. ^ a b RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre; TCWC Brisbane; TCWC Wellington (May 22, 2009). "RSMC Nadi — Tropical Cyclone Centre Best Track Data for 1996/97 Cyclone Season". Fiji Meteorological Service, Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited, Australian Bureau of Meteorology. United States: International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship. Retrieved January 31, 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Matt Megan's World". The Manawatu Standard. Palmerston North, New Zealand. April 2, 1997. p. 3. – via Lexis Nexis (subscription required)
  6. ^ a b "The Perfect Storm October 1991" (PDF). National Climatic Data Center. 2008-08-20. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-12-03.
  7. ^ Edward Rappaport (1996-11-07). "[U]nnamed tropical storm (formerly Tropical Depression One-E)". National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2008-05-05.
  8. ^ Blake, Eric S; Kimberlain, Todd B; National Hurricane Center (December 2, 2011). Unnamed Tropical Storm: September 1 - 2, 2011 (PDF) (Tropical Cyclone Report). United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. p. 2. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 5, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b Benkman, Walter E (1963). Rosendal, Hans E, ed. Tropical Cyclones in the Eastern North Pacific, 1962 (Mariners Weather Log: Volume 7 Issue 2: March 1963). United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. p. 46-49. ISSN 0025-3367. OCLC 648466886.
  10. ^ Shaw Samuel; Central Pacific Hurricane Center. A History of Tropical Cyclones In the Central North Pacific and the Hawaiian Islands 1832-1979. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Retrieved August 6, 2013.
  11. ^ National Hurricane Center; Hurricane Research Division; Central Pacific Hurricane Center. "The Northeast and North Central Pacific hurricane database 1949–2017". United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. A guide on how to read the database is available here.
  12. ^ Rappaport, Edward N; National Hurricane Center (November 7, 1996). Unnamed Tropical Storm, (formerly Tropical Depression One-E): May 13 - 16 1996 (PDF) (Tropical Cyclone Report). United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Archived from the original on August 5, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2013.
  13. ^ Landsea, Christopher W; Dorst, Neal M (June 1, 2014). "Subject: Tropical Cyclone Names: B1) How are tropical cyclones named?". Tropical Cyclone Frequently Asked Question. United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Research Division. Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved May 19, 2017.
  14. ^ Cry, George (July 1958). Bristow, Gerald C, ed. "Naming hurricanes and typhoons". Mariners Weather Log. 2 (4): 109. hdl:2027/uc1.b3876059. ISSN 0025-3367. OCLC 648466886.
  15. ^ "Mid-Season Review". India Meteorological Department. Archived from the original on August 10, 2007. Retrieved 2008-05-05.
  16. ^ Gary Padgett (2002-04-20). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary December 2001". Retrieved 2007-10-21.
  17. ^ "The Australian Tropical Cyclone Database" (CSV). Australian Bureau of Meteorology. A guide on how to read the database is available here.
  18. ^ "Tropical Cyclone 22U". Australian Bureau of Meteorology. April 28, 2017. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  19. ^ "Atlantic hurricane best track (HURDAT version 2)". Hurricane Research Division (Database). National Hurricane Center. May 1, 2018. Retrieved February 10, 2019.

External links[edit]