List of wars involving Australia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of wars, armed conflicts and rebellions involving the Commonwealth of Australia (1901 – present) and its predecessor colonies, the colonies of New South Wales (1788–1901), Van Diemen's Land (1825–1856), Tasmania (1856–1901), Victoria (1851–1901), Swan River (1829–1832), Western Australia (1832–1901), South Australia (1836–1901), Queensland (1859–1901). Dates indicate the years in which Australia was involved in the war. Notable militarised interstate disputes are included. For a list of wars that have been fought on the Australian mainland and in Australian waters, see the list of conflicts in Australia.

  Victory
  Defeat
  Another result (e.g. a treaty or peace without a clear result, status quo ante bellum, result of civil or internal conflict, result unknown or indecisive, inconclusive)
  Ongoing conflict

Colonial Australia (1788–1901)[edit]

Colonial Australia refers to the Commonwealth of Australia's predecessor colonies, the colonies of New South Wales (1788–1901), Van Diemen's Land (1825–1856), Tasmania (1856–1901), Victoria (1851–1901), Swan River (1829–1832), Western Australia (1832–1901), South Australia (1836–1901), Queensland (1859–1901) and there territories and islands.

List of wars involving Colonial Australia
Conflict Combatant 1 Combatant 2 Result for Australia and/or its Allies Australian losses
(Killed or missing)
Military Civilians
Sydney Cove War[1]

(1790–1800)

part Australian frontier wars

Kingdom of Great Britain Kingdom of Great Britain (1790–1800)

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1802)

Aboriginal Australians Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
unknown unknown
Pemulwuy's War

(1790–1802)

part of Hawkesbury and Nepean Wars and Australian frontier wars

Kingdom of Great Britain Kingdom of Great Britain (1790–1800)

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1802)

Burraberongal Tribe (1795–1802)

Indigenous clans: Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Death of Pemulwuy
0 2[2]
Hawkesbury and Nepean War

(1794–1816 )

part of Hawkesbury and Nepean Wars and Australian frontier wars

Kingdom of Great Britain Kingdom of Great Britain (1795–1800)

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–16)

Burraberongal Tribe

Indigenous clans:

Irish-convict sympathisers

Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Legal disputes until 1992 Mabo decision
80–300 unknown
Tedbury's War

(1804–1805)

part of Hawkesbury and Nepean Wars and Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Indigenous clans: Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Death of Tedbury
unknown 3+
Rum Rebellion

(1808–1810)

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland United Kingdom New South Wales Corps Result of Civil conflict / status quo ante bellum 0 0
Bathurst War

(1824)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Wiradjuri nation Victory ~20[3] 0[3]
Black War

(1828–32)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Aboriginal Tasmanians Victory
  • British control of Tasmania
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
201[4] 18[4]
The Port Phillip District Wars

(1830–1850)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Aboriginal Australians

Gunditjmara People

  • Kilcarer gundidj clan

Dja Dja Wurrung

Taungurung

Gunai Kurnai people

Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
0 7–11
The Eumeralla Wars

(1834–1849 or 1860s)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

British colonists

Border Police of New South Wales

Native Police

Aboriginal Australians

Gunditjmara People

Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
~80
Wiradjuri Wars[1]

(1838–1841)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Wiradjuri people Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
unknown unknown
Mandandanji Land War[1]

(1842–1852)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Mandandanji people Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
War of Southern Queensland (1843–1855)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Aboriginal Australians

Taribelang Aboriginal tribe United Tribes

  • Logan District
  • Moreton Bay Islands
  • Burnett River
  • Wide Bay District
  • Bundaberg
  • Mount Perry
  • Gympie
  • Bribie Island
  • Fraser Island
  • Gayndah
  • Mount Brisbane' (D'Aguilar Ranges) (Mountain Tribes)
  • Kilcoy/Esk
  • Brisbane/Enoggera
Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
~174 – 800
Port Augusta War[1] (1844–1845)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Aboriginal Australians

Nukunu people

Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous clans
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
Flagstaff War

(1845–1846)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

Forces of Tamati Waka Nene

Māori Kupapa

Ngapuhi Iwi Inconclusive/Ceasefire
Hutt Valley Campaign(1846)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

United KingdomBritish Settlers

Te Ati Awa Iwi

Māori Kupapa

Ngati Toa Iwi

Ngāti Rangatahi

Ngāti Hāuaterangi

Victory
Whanganui campaign(1847)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

Māori Kupapa

Ngāti Haua-te-rangi

Ngāti Patutokotoko

Ngāti Ruaka

Treaty
Eureka Rebellion (1851–1854) United KingdomColony of Victoria Anti-Gold Licence Association (Red Ribbon Rebellion)

Stockade rebels

Victory
  • Miners rebellion defeated by the Victorian authorities
2 unknown
Indian Mutiny[5](1857–1858)  British Empire

 East India Company

 Kingdom of Nepal

Sepoy Mutineers

Mughal Empire

Oudh

Forces of Rani Lakshmibai of Jhansi

Forces of Nana Sahib Peshwa II

Jagdishpur

Gwalior factions

Jodhpur factions

Banda

Various other Rajas, Nawabs, Zamindars, Thakurs, Chaudharys, Taluqdars, Sardars, and chieftains

Victory
First Taranaki War

(1860–1861)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire Taranaki Māori
Kīngitanga
Ceasefire 238 0
Waikato Wars

(1863–1864)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand.svg Kīngitanga

Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand.svg North Island allies

Victory
Second Taranaki War

(1863–1866)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire Taranaki Māori Inconclusive
  • Tribes either surrendered or withdrew towards the mountain.
Tauranga Campaign(1864)


Part of the New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

United KingdomBritish Settlers

Māori Kupapa

Taranaki Māori Victory
East Cape War

(1865–1866)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

United KingdomBritish Settlers

Māori Kupapa

Hau-Hauist Maori

Whakatohea Māori Urewera Māori Ngai Tama Māori

Victory
  • Dispossession of land of the indigenous Māori
  • Occupation and settlement of European colonists on conquered land
  • 2013 Crown apology[10]
Titokowaru's War

(1868–1869)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

Māori Kupapa

Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand.svg Ngāti Ruanui Iwi

Ngāruahine tribes

Victory
  • Ngāti Ruanui and Ngaruahine withdrawal
Te Kooti's War

(1868–1872)

Part of New Zealand Wars

 British Empire

Māori Kupapa

Ngāti Porou

Ngāti Kahungunu

Māori Iwis

Ringatū adherents

Pai Mārire adherents

Victory
Kalkadoon Wars 1870–1890

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Kalkadoon people Victory 0 5
Arnhem Wars(1880s–1890s)

part of Australian frontier wars

United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Yolŋu people
Bininj people
Maung people
Victory
Mahdist War(1885)  British Empire

 Ethiopia

 Italy[11]

 Congo Free State

Mahdist Sudan Victory 0 0
Third Anglo-Burmese war(1886–1887) United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland British Empire
  •  India
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland British special-service officers
  • New South Wales New South Wales special-service officers
Konbaung dynasty Burmese Empire Victory 0 0
Jandamarra Guerilla War

(1894–97)

part of Australian frontier wars

 British Empire Jandamarra
Bunuba people
Victory
  • Death of Jandamarra
2+ unknown

Commonwealth of Australia (1901–present)[edit]

List of wars involving the Commonwealth of Australia
Conflict Combatant 1 Combatant 2 Result for Australia and/or its Allies Australian losses
(Killed or missing)
Military Civilians
Second Boer War
(1899–1902)

Part of the Boer Wars during the Scramble for Africa

Victory 606[12] None[12]
Boxer Rebellion
(1900–1901)
Victory
  • Rebellion suppressed
  • Signing of the Boxer Protocol
  • Provisions for foreign troops stationed in Beijing
6[13] None[13]
World War I
(1914–1918)
Victory 62,149 [14] None[14]
Russian Civil War
(1918–1920)
Defeat
  • Allied withdrawal from Russia
  • Bolshevik victory over White Army
  • The Soviet Union becomes the new Russian power
10[15] Unknown
Armenian–Azerbaijani War
(1918–1920)

Part of the Caucasus campaign of World War I, the Southern Front of the Russian Civil War and the Turkish–Armenian War


Defeat
  • Sovietization of Armenia and Azerbaijan
  • Disputes over Karabakh and Nakhichevan settled in favor of Soviet Azerbaijan
  • Zangezur gained by Soviet Armenia
None Unknown
Egyptian Revolution of 1919

(1918-1919)

 Britain Wafd Party Victory 1+[17] 31
1927 Malaita Punitive Expedition
(1927)
Victory
  • Stabilisation of malaita
  • 198 Kwaio arrested and detained[18]
None[19] None[19]
World War II
(1939–1945)
Victory 39,366[20] 735[20]
Anglo-Iraqi War
(1941)

Part of the Second World War

Allied powers:

Air and naval support:

Axis powers :

Military support :

Victory None None
Korean War
(1950–1953)
Ceasefire 340[28] None[28]
Malayan Emergency
(1950–1960)
Victory
  • Communist retreat from Malaya, Chin Peng exiled
39[29] None[29]
Borneo Confrontation
(1963–1966)
Victory
  • Indonesia accepts the formation of Malaysia
23[30] None[30]
Vietnam War
(1965–1973)
Defeat 521[31] None[31]
Gulf War
(1990–1991)
Victory None[32] None[32]
Australian-led international intervention into the 1999 East Timorese crisis
(1999–2000)

Supported by:

Victory 2 None
Sierra Leone Civil War(2000–2003) Sierra Leone Sierra Leone

 United Kingdom (2000–2002)

 Guinea

ECOMOG Forces (1998–2000)

Executive Outcomes (1995–1996)

Supported by:

 United States

 Belarus[50]

United Nations UNAMSIL

Sl RUF.png RUF

Sierra Leone AFRC (1997–2002)

West Side Boys (1998–2000)

Liberia Liberia (1997–2002)

Supported by:

 Libya

 Burkina Faso

Victory
Civil war in Afghanistan (1996–2001)
(2001)

Part of the Afghanistan conflict, the Iran–Saudi Arabia proxy conflict, and the War on terror

 Russia[59][60]

 Iran[59][60]

 Uzbekistan[59][60]

 India[61]

 Tajikistan

 Turkey

 Turkmenistan

 Kazakhstan

 Kyrgyzstan

From September 2001:

 United States

 United Kingdom

 France

 Canada

 Australia

 Pakistan[62][63]

Supported by:

 Saudi Arabia[63]

 United Arab Emirates

 Qatar

Military stalemate

Continued clashes until the US-led invasion of Afghanistan

None None
War in Afghanistan
(2001–2021)

Afghanistan Northern Alliance


Defeat 41[64] None[64]
Iraq War
(2003–2009)



Victory 2[32] None[32]
Operation Anode
(2003–2013)
Victory
  • Stabilisation of Solomon Islands
  • Australia, New Zealand, Tonga and Papua New Guinean forces withdraw forces
1 [67][68] None[67]
Iraqi civil war (2006–2008)
(2006–2008)

Part of the Iraq War

Sunni factions:

Shi'ite factions:
Victory None None[32]
Operation Astute
(2006–2013)

Part of 2006 East Timorese crisis

Victory
  • Stabilisation of East Timor
3[70] None[70]
Operation Ocean Shield
(2009–2016)
* Somali pirates Victory
  • Number of pirate attacks dramatically decreased
  • The US Office of Naval Intelligence have officially reported that in 2013, only 9 incidents of piracy were reported and that none of them were successfully hijacked[citation needed]
  • Piracy drops 90%[71]
None None
Iraqi Civil War (2013–2017)
(2014–2017)

Part of the Iraqi conflict, spillover of the Syrian civil war, international military intervention against the Islamic State and the War on terror





Victory 1[72] 0
American-led intervention in Syrian civil war
(2014–2017)

Part of the Syrian civil war, international military intervention against the Islamic State and the War on terror

Supported by:




  •  Israel (limited involvement; against Hezbollah and government forces only)



Supported by:

Inconclusive, conflict ongoing None None
War on ISIL
(2014–present)

Part of the Second Libyan Civil War, War in Iraq (2013–2017), Syrian civil war and spillover of the Syrian civil war, Sinai insurgency, Boko Haram insurgency, insurgency in the North Caucasus, War on terror, and Moro conflict


Ongoing
  • Airstrikes on ISIL and al-Qaeda positions in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Nigeria, and Afghanistan
None None
Marawi crisis
(2017)


Part of the Moro conflict and the Military intervention against ISIL

 Philippines
Supported by:
 Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Victory None None
Islamic State insurgency in Iraq (2017–present)
(2017–2021)


Part of the Iraqi conflict (2003–present)

 Iraq

Pro-Government Tribes[94]

Rojava (cross-border cooperation since May 2018)

Seal of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve.svg CJTF-OIR (until 2021):

Supported by:

Iran Iran
Qatar Qatar
Egypt Egypt

 NATO


 Kurdistan Region

Supported by:

Netherlands Netherlands

Islamic State

White Flags


Iraqi Baath Party
Inconclusive, conflict ongoing
  • Airstrikes on ISIL positions
None None

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ HMAS Yarra, representing Australia, participated at sea.[22]
  2. ^ HMNZS Leander, representing New Zealand, participated at sea.[23]
  3. ^ Greek airmen undergoing training at Habbaniya flew sorties against the Iraqis.[24]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ F. M. Bladen (ed.), "Government and General Order. 22 November 1801.", Historical Records of New South Wales, vol. IV – HUNTER AND KING, p. 629, archived from the original on 6 April 2011
  3. ^ a b Keneally, Thomas (2010). Australians: Origins to Eurika. Allen & Unwin Publishing. p. Chapter 19, subheading: Myall Creek and Beyond. ISBN 9781742374505.
  4. ^ a b Clements 2013, pp. 324, 325
  5. ^ "Indian Mutiny, 1857–1858". www.awm.gov.au. Retrieved 9 August 2022.
  6. ^ a b Belich, James (1986). The New Zealand Wars. Auckland: Penguin. pp. 119–125. ISBN 0-14-027504-5.
  7. ^ Michael King (2003). The Penguin History of New Zealand. Penguin Books. p. 214. ISBN 0-14-301867-1.
  8. ^ Dalton, B.J. (1967). War and Politics in New Zealand 1855–1870. Sydney: Sydney University Press. pp. 176–179.
  9. ^ King, Michael (1977). Te Puea: A Life. Penguin Random House New Zealand Limited (published 2013). ISBN 9781742539683. Retrieved 13 January 2021. The 'fertile and most beautiful fields' [...] and the river itself [...] provided the incentive and the means for an invasion of the Waikato. Auckland was swelling with new settlers; government ministers and land purchase officers were determined to acquire the fruitful acreage south of the city; the fact that it was controlled by a movement pledged not to sell land damned the Kingites in the eyes of most Europeans [...].
  10. ^ Laing, Doug (27 May 2013). "Crown apology to Bay hapu in Treaty claim settlement". The New Zealand Herald. Auckland. Retrieved 11 February 2014.
  11. ^ Meredith Reid Sarkees, Frank Whelon Wayman (2010). Resort to war: a data guide to inter-state, extra-state, intra-state, and non-state wars, 1816–2007. Washington, DC.
  12. ^ a b Australia and the Boer War, 1899–1902, Australian War Memorial.
  13. ^ a b China (Boxer Rebellion), 1900–01, Australian War Memorial.
  14. ^ a b First World War 1914–18, Australian War Memorial.
  15. ^ [Muirden 1990].
  16. ^ Australian War Memorial – Egyptian Uprising 1919
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  19. ^ a b Navy, corporateName=Royal Australian. "Semaphore: HMAS Adelaide and the 1927 Malaita Expedition". www.navy.gov.au. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
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  21. ^ Young, p. 7.
  22. ^ Wavell, p. 4094.
  23. ^ Waters, p. 24.
  24. ^ Carr, John (2012). On Spartan Wings – The Royal Hellenic Air Force in World War Two. Pen & Sword Aviation. ISBN 978-1-84884-798-9.
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  26. ^ Playfair 1956, p. 196.
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  29. ^ a b Malayan Emergency, Australian War Memorial.
  30. ^ a b Indonesian Confrontation, 1963–66, Australian War Memorial.
  31. ^ a b Vietnam War 1962–75, Australian War Memorial.
  32. ^ a b c d e Iraq, Australian War Memorial.
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  50. ^ Торговля оружием и будущее Белоруссии
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  60. ^ a b c Cite error: The named reference Rashid722 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
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