List of women's rights activists

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This article is a list of notable women's rights activists, arranged alphabetically by modern country names and by the names of the persons listed.

Albania[edit]

Argentina[edit]

Australia[edit]

  • Thelma Bate (1904–1984) – community leader, advocate for inclusion of Aboriginals in Country Women's Association
  • Sandra Bloodworth – labour historian, socialist activist, co-founder of Trotskyist Socialist Alternative, editor of Marxist Left Review
  • Eva Cox (born 1938) – sociologist and feminist active in politics and social services, member of Women's Electoral Lobby, social commentator on women in power and at work, and social justice
  • Zelda D'Aprano (born 1928) – trade unionist, feminist, in 1969 chained herself to doors of Commonwealth Building over equal pay.
  • Louisa Margaret Dunkley (1866–1927) – telegraphist and labour organizer
  • Elizabeth Evatt (born 1933) – legal reformist, jurist, critic of Australia's Sex Discrimination Act, first Australian in United Nations Commission on Human Rights
  • Miles Franklin (1879–1954) – writer and feminist
  • Vida Goldstein (1869–1949) – early Australian feminist campaigning for women's suffrage and social reform, first woman in British Empire to stand for national election
  • Germaine Greer (born 1939) – author of The Female Eunuch, academic and social commentator
  • Bella Guerin (1858–1923) – first woman to graduate from an Australian university, Guerin was a socialist feminist prominent (although with periods of public dispute) within the Australian Labor Party.
  • Louisa Lawson (1848–1920)) – feminist, suffragist, author, founder of The Dawn, and pro-republican federalist
  • Eileen Powell (1913–1997) – trade unionist, women's activist and contributor to the Equal Pay for Equal Work decision
  • Millicent Preston-Stanley (1883–1955) – first female member of New South Wales Legislative Assembly, campaigner for custodial rights of mothers in divorce and for women's health care
  • Elizabeth Anne Reid (born 1942) – world's first women's affairs adviser to head of government (Gough Whitlam), active in UN and on HIV
  • Bessie Rischbieth (1874–1967)) – earliest female appointee to any court (honorary, Perth Children's Court, 1915), active against Australian government practice of taking Aboriginal children from their mothers (Stolen Generation
  • Jessie Street (1889–1970) – Australian suffragette, feminist and human rights campaigner influential in labour rights and early days of UN
  • Anne Summers (born 1945) – women's rights activist in politics and media, women's advisor to Labor premier Paul Keating, editor of Ms. magazine (NY)
  • Rosie Batty (born 1962) – 2015 Australian of the Year and family violence campaigner
  • Fiona Patten (born 1964) – leader of Australian Sex Party, lobbyist for personal freedoms and progressive lifestyles
  • Michelle Payne (born 1985) – first female winner of Melbourne Cup and an advocate of increased presence of women in sport
  • Margot Fink (born 1994) – Prominent LGBTIQ activist and nominee for Young Australian of the Year (2016)

Austria[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Botswana[edit]

  • Unity Dow (born 1959) – judge and writer, plaintiff in case allowing children of mixed parentage to be deemed nationals

Bulgaria[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Canada[edit]

Cape Verde[edit]

Chile[edit]

Chinese[edit]

Croatia[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Egypt[edit]

  • Qasim Amin (1863–1908) – jurist, early advocate of women’s rights in society
  • Nawal el-Saadawi (born 1931) – writer and doctor, advocate of women’s health and equality
  • Hoda Shaarawi (1879–1947) – feminist organizer of Mubarrat Muhammad Ali (women’s social service organization), Union of Educated Egyptian Women, and Wafdist Women’s Central Committee, founder president of Egyptian Feminist Union
  • Engy Ghozlan (born 1985) – coordinator of campaigns against sexual harassment
  • Soraya Bahgat (born 1983) – Egyptian-Finnish women's rights advocate, social entrepreneur and founder of Tahrir Bodyguard

Estonia[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Ghana[edit]

Greece[edit]

Hungary[edit]

India[edit]

Indonesia[edit]

  • Raden Adjeng Kartini (1879–1904) – Javanese advocate for native Indonesian women, critic of polygamy and lack of women's education

Iran[edit]

Ireland[edit]

Israel[edit]

Italy[edit]

Japan[edit]

Lebanon[edit]

Libya[edit]

  • Alaa Murabit (born 1989) – physician, advocate of inclusive security, peace-building and post-conflict governance

Luxembourg[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Namibia[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

  • Kate Sheppard (1847–1934) – suffragette, influential in winning voting rights for women in 1893 (first country and national election in which women have vote)

Nigeria[edit]

Norway[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

Peru[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Poland[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Puerto Rico[edit]

  • Luisa Capetillo (1879–1922) – labor union suffragette jailed for wearing pants in public

Romania[edit]

Russia[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Slovenia[edit]

  • Alojzija Štebi (1883–1956), suffragist, who saw socialism as a means of equalizing society for both men and women.

Somalia[edit]

  • Ayaan Hirsi Ali (born 1969) – Somali-Dutch feminist and atheist activist, writer and politician

South Africa[edit]

  • Shamima Shaikh (1960–1998) – member of the Muslim Youth Movement of South Africa, exponent of Islamic gender equality

Spain[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

Uruguay[edit]

Images[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard J. Evans: The feminist movement in Germany. London, Beverly Hills 1976 (SAGE Studies in 20th Century History, Vol. 6). ISBN 0-8039-9951-8, S. 120
  2. ^ Prah, Mansah (2002). "Jiagge, Annie (1918–1996)". In Commire, Anne. Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Waterford, Connecticut: Yorkin Publications. ISBN 0-7876-4074-3. (subscription required (help)). 
  3. ^ http://www.deccanherald.com/content/393915/jampk-witnesses-steady-increase-crimes.html
  4. ^ Parker, Jacqueline (1974). Helen Valeska Bary: Labor Administration and Social Security: A Woman's Life. Berkeley CA: University of California. 
  5. ^ Santiago-Valles, Kelvin A. (1994). Subject People and Colonial Discourses: Economic Transformation and Social Disorder in Puerto Rico, 1898–1947. SUNY Press. p. 58, 161. ISBN 9781438418650. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  6. ^ [1], additional text.