List of works by John Vanbrugh

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John Vanbrugh created many disparate works, and this is a list of many of the notable ones.

  1. Castle Howard, c1699[1] (west wing designed by Sir Thomas Robinson only completed in early 19th century).
  2. The architect's own house in Whitehall, 1700–1701, known as "Goose-pie house", demolished 1898.[2]
  3. The Orangery, Kensington Palace, 1704: probably a modification by Vanbrugh to a design by Hawksmoor.[3]
  4. Haymarket Theatre, 1704–05,[4] has been completely rebuilt since and is now known as Her Majesty's.[5]
  5. Blenheim Palace, 1705–1722,[6] stable court never completed.
  6. Grand Bridge, Blenheim, 1708–22.[7]
  7. Kimbolton Castle, 1708–19,[8] remodelled the building.
  8. Demolished part of Audley End and designed new Grand Staircase, 1708.[9]
  9. Claremont House, 1708,[10] then known as Chargate (rebuilt to the designs of Henry Holland in the 18th century).
  10. Kings Weston House, 1710–14.[11]
  11. Grimsthorpe Castle, 1715–30, only the north side of the courtyard was rebuilt.[12]
  12. Eastbury Park, 1713–1738, completed by Roger Morris who amended Vanbrugh's design (demolished except for Kitchen Wing).[13]
  13. Cholmondeley Castle 1713 Vanbrugh prepared a design to rebuild the house, but it is believed not to have been executed[14]
  14. Great Obelisk, Castle Howard 1714[15]
  15. Morpeth Town Hall, 1714. (Front renewed and back replaced in 1869–70.)[16]
  16. The Belvedere, Claremont Landscape Garden, 1715.[17]
  17. Vanbrugh Castle, 1718-19, the architect's own house in Greenwich.[18] Additionally, houses for other members of Vanbrugh's family (none of which survived beyond 1910).[19]
  18. Stowe, Buckinghamshire, c.1719, added north portico, also several temples and follies in the gardens (the surviving follies are: the Wolfe Obelisk (c.1720), relocated 1759; the Rotunda (1720–21) dome altered; the Lake Pavilions (c.1719) altered[20]) up until his death.[21]
  19. The Temple,[22] Eastbury Park (early 1720s) demolished
  20. Robin Hood's Well,[23] Yorkshire C.1720
  21. Seaton Delaval Hall, 1720–28.[24]
  22. Lumley Castle, 1722, remodelling work.[25]
  23. Pyramid Gate, Castle Howard 1723[26]
  24. Walled Kitchen Garden,[27] Claremont (c.1723)
  25. Newcastle Pew, St George's Church, Esher, 1724.[28]
  26. The Bagnio (water pavilion),[29] Eastbury Park (1725) demolished
  27. Temple of the Four Winds, Castle Howard, 1725–8.[30]

Attributed works include:

  1. Completion of State rooms, Hampton Court Palace, 1716–18.[31]
  2. Ordnance Board Building, Woolwich, 1716–20.[32]
  3. Chatham Dockyard Great Store House 1717, now demolished, Vanburgh or Hawksmoor were possibly involved in the design[33]
  4. Berwick Barracks, 1717–21.[note 1]
  5. The Brewhouse,[34] Kings Weston House (c.1718)
  6. Chatham Dockyard Main gate 1720, is possibly by Vanburgh or Hawksmoor[33]
  7. Loggia, Kings Weston House (c.1722)[35]

Gallery of architectural work[edit]

Vanbrugh's architectural work
Castle Howard, north front 
Castle Howard, north front 
Castle Howard, south front 
Castle Howard, south front 
Great Obelisk, Castle Howard 
Pyramid Gate, Castle Howard 
Blenheim Palace, north front 
North portico, Blenheim Palace 
Blenheim Palace, from the south-west 
Blenheim Palace, view north along the chapel colonnade 
Entrance to Kitchen court, Blenheim Palace 
Kitchen court, Blenheim Palace 
South front, Blenheim Palace 
North front, Blenheim Palace 
East front, Blenheim Palace 
Plan of Blenheim Palace, the colonnade enclosing the courtyard was never built 
Grand Bridge, Blenheim Palace 
Kimbolton Castle 
Seaton Delaval Hall, north front 
Seaton Delaval Hall, north front 
Seaton Delaval Hall, from the south-west 
Belvedere, Claremont 
South front, Kings Weston House 
East front, Kings Weston House 
Loggia, Kings Weston House (attributed to Vanbrugh) 
The Brewhouse, Kings Weston House (attributed to Vanbrugh) 
Grimsthorpe Castle, from the north 
Lumley Castle 
Western Lake Pavilion, Stowe 
Wolfe Obelisk, Stowe 
Rotunda, Stowe 
Robin Hood's Well, Yorkshire 
Ordnance Board Building, Woolwich Arsenal, London (attributed to Vanbrugh) 
Chatham Dockyard gateway (possibly by Vanbrugh) 
Newcastle Pew, St. George's Church Esher 

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "The Castle Howard Story: The Building of Castle Howard". Castle Howard. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 8 May 2010. 
  2. ^ Beard, p. 70.
  3. ^ The London Encyclopaedia, ed. Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert, rev. ed. (London: Macmillan London, 1993; ISBN 0-333-57688-8), pp. 311, 438.
  4. ^ Beard, p. 71
  5. ^ "Her Majesty's (London)". Theatre's Trust. Retrieved 9 June 2010. 
  6. ^ "Blenheim Palace". World Heritage sites. UNESCO. Retrieved 8 May 2010. 
  7. ^ Sherwood and Pevsner, p. 473.
  8. ^ Saumarez Smith, The Building of Castle Howard, p.96.
  9. ^ John Julius Norwich, The Architecture of Southern England (London: Macmillan London, 1985; ISBN 0-333-22037-4), p. 208.
  10. ^ Geoffrey Tyack and Steven Brindle, Blue Guide Country Houses of England (London: Black, 1994; ISBN 0-393-31057-4), p.468.
  11. ^ Norwich, The Architecture of Southern England, p. 27.
  12. ^ Tyack and Brindle, Blue Guide Country Houses of England, pp. 315–16.
  13. ^ Norwich, The Architecture of Southern England, p. 182.
  14. ^ page 141, The Work of Sir John Vanbrugh, Geoffrey Beard, 1986, Batsford Books, ISBN 0-7134-4679-X
  15. ^ page 132, The Building of Castle Howard, Charles Saumarez Smith, 1990, Faber and Faber, ISBN O-571-14238-9
  16. ^ John Grundy et al., Northumberland (London: Penguin, 1992; ISBN 0-14-071059-0), pp. 73, 397.
  17. ^ Tyack and Brindle, Blue Guide Country Houses of England, pp. 468–69.
  18. ^ Beard, p. 56.
  19. ^ Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, London 2 South (London: Penguin, 1983; ISBN 0-14-071047-7), p. 273.
  20. ^ pages 13, 24 & , Stowe Landscape Gardens, 1997, Jonathan Marsden et al, National Trust 1997
  21. ^ Norwich, The Architecture of Southern England, p. 69.
  22. ^ page 117, Vanburgh, Kerry Downes, 1977 A. Zwemmer Ltd, ISBN 0-302-02769-6
  23. ^ page 46 ,Sir John Vanbrugh Storyteller in Stone, Vaughan Hart, 2008, Yale University Press
  24. ^ Grundy et al., Northumberland, pp. 73, 561–63.
  25. ^ Beard p. 66
  26. ^ page 134, The Building of Castle Howard, Charles Saumarez Smith, 1990, Faber and Faber, ISBN O-571-14238-9
  27. ^ page 235 ,Sir John Vanbrugh Storyteller in Stone, Vaughan Hart, 2008, Yale University Press
  28. ^ Norwich, The Architecture of Southern England, p. 618.
  29. ^ page 27, The Country Houses of Sir John Vanbrugh: From the Archives of Country Life, Jeremy Musson, 2008, Aurum
  30. ^ Saumarez Smith, The Building of Castle Howard, pp. 144–46.
  31. ^ Cherry and Pevsner, London 2 South, p. 494.
  32. ^ The attribution is described as plausible in Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, London 2 South, p. 287.
  33. ^ a b page 164, The Work of Sir John Vanbrugh, Geoffrey Beard, 1986, Batsford Books, ISBN 0-7134-4679-X
  34. ^ pages 153-154, English Homes, Period IV - vol.II, The work of Sir John Vanbrugh and his School 1699-1736, H. Avery Tipping and Christopher Hussey, 1928, Country Life
  35. ^ page 177,Sir John Vanbrugh Storyteller in Stone, Vaughan Hart, 2008, Yale University Press
  1. ^ Described as a misattribution in Grundy et al., Northumberland, pp. 74, 178–79. Grundy et al. attribute the design to Hawksmoor, saying that this was probably modified in execution by Andrews Jelfe.