List of world champion football clubs

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World club champion trophies

This list includes the official (de jure) world champion football clubs recognized by FIFA. The official competitions that grant this title are the Intercontinental Cup (1960–2004) and the FIFA Club World Cup (2000, 2005–present).

Competitions[edit]

FIFA Club World Cup[edit]

The FIFA Club World Cup is an international men's association football competition organised by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament officially assigns the world title.[1] The competition was first contested in 2000 as the FIFA Club World Championship. It was not held between 2001 and 2004 due to a combination of factors, most importantly the collapse of FIFA's marketing partner International Sport and Leisure.[2] Since 2005, the competition has been held every year, and has been hosted by Brazil, Japan, the United Arab Emirates and Morocco. The FIFA Club World Cup's prestige is perceived quite differently in different parts of the football world; while it is widely regarded as the most distinguished club level trophy in South America,[3][4] it struggles to attract interest in most of Europe compared to the UEFA Champions League and commonly lacks recognition as a high-ranking contest.[5][6]

The first FIFA Club World Championship took place in Brazil in 2000. but the failure of ISL caused FIFA to discontinue the tournament and cancel the following year competition to be held in Spain. This first failed instalment ran parallel with the Intercontinental Cup (also known as European/South American Cup), a competition organised jointly by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and the Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (CONMEBOL) first disputed in 1960 by the winners of the European Champions' Cup and the Copa Libertadores. FIFA finally managed to buy the prestigious Japanese Event and in 2005, after the Intercontinental Cup's last edition, that competition was merged with FIFA. The failed FIFA Club World Cup's first edition was renamed as "FIFA Club World Championship" and a new Trophy replaced the Intercontintenal Cup Thophy as well as the Toyota Cup. In 2006, the tournament took its current name.

The current format of the tournament involves seven teams competing for the title at venues within the host nation over a period of about two weeks; the winners of that year's AFC Champions League (Asia), CAF Champions League (Africa), CONCACAF Champions League (North America), Copa Libertadores (South America), OFC Champions League (Oceania) and UEFA Champions League (Europe), along with the host nation's national champions, participate in a straight knock-out tournament. The host nation's national champions dispute a play-off against the Oceania champions, from which the winner joins the champions of Asia, Africa and North America at the quarter-finals. The quarter-final winners go on to face the European and South American champions, who enter at the semi-final stage, for a place in the final. In Europe the tournament is almost ignored by the mass media, also because of its sporting level, considered inferior to the Intercontinental Cup,[7] indeed when the sides used to meet in a one-off game in Japan (and even before), this was still a fair fight. The opening up of the global market in football has changed the balance. These days the best South Americans (and the stars from all the other continents) are usually playing in Europe.[8][9]

Intercontinental Cup[edit]

The Intercontinental Cup, also known as European/South American Cup, was an official international football competition endorsed by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and the Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (CONMEBOL),[10][11][12] contested between representative clubs from these confederations, usually the winners of the European Champions' Cup (now known as the UEFA Champions League), and the South American Copa Libertadores. The competition was played by representatives clubs of most developed continents in the football world; has since been replaced by the FIFA Club World Cup. All editions were official UEFA and CONMEBOL competitions,[13][14] and indirectly also of FIFA.[15][16][17][18]

From its formation in 1960 to 1979, the competition was contested over a two legged tie, with a playoff if necessary until 1968, and penalty kicks later. During the 1970s, European participation in the Intercontinental Cup became a running question due to controversial events in the 1969 final,[19] and some European Champions Club' winner teams withdrew.[20] From 1980 until 2004, the competition was contested over a single match held in Japan and sponsored by multinational automaker Toyota, which offered a secondary trophy (that flanked the original), the Toyota Cup.[21]

Throughout the history of football, various attempts have been made to organize a tournament that identifies "the best club team in the world" – such as the Football World Championship, the Lipton Trophy, the Copa Rio, the Pequeña Copa del Mundo - due to FIFA's lack of interest or inability to organize club competitions.[22] The Intercontinental Cup is considered by FIFA as the official predecessor[23][15] to the FIFA Club World Cup, which was held for the first time in 2000.[24]

All the winning teams were regarded by worldwide mass media and the football community, FIFA included (as News Center productions and not cataloged on the FIFA website as official entity documents),[25] as "world champions" de facto.[26][27][28][29] On 27 October 2017, the FIFA Council, while not promoting statistical unification between the Intercontinental Cup and the Club World Cup, in respect to the history of the two tournaments[30] (which merged in 2005),[31] has officialised (de jure) the title of the Intercontinental Cup, recognising all the winners as official club world champions,[32][33][34][35] with the same title of the FIFA Club World Cup winners, or "FIFA Club World Champions".[36][37][38][39][40][41][42]

Other[edit]

FIFA recognises the Intercontinental Cup as the sole direct predecessor of the Club World Cup, and the champions of both aforementioned competitions are the only ones uncontroversially officially recognised as Club World Champions in the FIFA Club World Cup Statistical Kit, the official document of FIFA's club competition.

On the recognition request of the 1951 worldwide club cup, see Copa Rio (international tournament).

Results by year[edit]

Intercontinental Cup era[edit]

Year Country Winners Score Runners-up Country Venue Location Refs
1960  ESP Real Madrid 0–0 Peñarol  URU Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay [43]
5–1 Santiago Bernabéu Madrid, Spain
1961  URU Peñarol 0–1 Benfica  POR Estádio da Luz Lisbon, Portugal [44]
5–0 Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay
2–1 Montevideo, Uruguay
1962  BRA Santos 3–2 Benfica  POR Estádio do Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Brazil [45]
5–2 Estádio da Luz Lisbon, Portugal
1963  BRA Santos 2–4 Milan  ITA San Siro Milan, Italy [46]
4–2 Estádio do Maracanã Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
1–0
1964  ITA Internazionale 0–1 Independiente  ARG La Doble Visera Avellaneda, Argentina [47]
2–0 San Siro Milan, Italy
1–0 (a.e.t.) Santiago Bernabéu Madrid, Spain
1965  ITA Internazionale 3–0 Independiente  ARG San Siro Milan, Italy [48]
0–0 La Doble Visera Avellaneda, Argentina
1966  URU Peñarol 2–0 Real Madrid  ESP Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay [49]
2–0 Santiago Bernabéu Madrid, Spain
1967  ARG Racing 0–1 Celtic  SCO Hampden Park Glasgow, Scotland [50]
2–1 El Cilindro Avellaneda, Argentina
1–0 Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay
1968  ARG Estudiantes 1–0 Manchester United  ENG Estadio Boca Juniors Buenos Aires, Argentina [51]
1–1 Old Trafford Manchester, England
1969  ITA Milan 3–0 Estudiantes  ARG San Siro Milan, Italy [52]
1–2 Estadio Boca Juniors Buenos Aires, Argentina
1970  NED Feyenoord 2–2 Estudiantes  ARG Estadio Boca Juniors Buenos Aires, Argentina [53]
1–0 De Kuip Rotterdam, Netherlands
1971  URU Nacional 1–1 Panathinaikos#1  GRE Karaiskakis Stadium Piraeus, Greece [54]
2–1 Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay
1972  NED Ajax 1–1 Independiente  ARG La Doble Visera Avellaneda, Argentina [55]
3–0 Olympic Stadium Amsterdam, Netherlands
1973  ARG Independiente 1–0 Juventus#2  ITA Stadio Olimpico Rome, Italy [56]
Second leg was not played. Argentina Independiente declared winner.
1974  ESP Atlético Madrid#3 0–1 Independiente  ARG La Doble Visera Avellaneda, Argentina [57]
2–0 Estadio Vicente Calderón Madrid, Spain
1975
Germany Bayern Munich and Argentina Independiente did not find compatible schedule to play.
[58]
1976  FRG Bayern Munich 2–0 Cruzeiro  BRA Olympiastadion Munich, West Germany [59]
0–0 Mineirão Belo Horizonte, Brazil
1977  ARG Boca Juniors 2–2 Borussia Mönchengladbach#4  FRG Estadio Boca Juniors Buenos Aires, Argentina [60]
3–0 Wildparkstadion Karlsruhe, West Germany
1978
England Liverpool declined to play the match against Argentina Boca Juniors due to scheduling problems.
[58]
1979  PAR Olimpia 1–0 Malmö FF#5  SWE Malmö Stadion Malmö, Sweden [61]
2–1 Defensores del Chaco Asunción, Paraguay
1980  URU Nacional 1–0 Nottingham Forest  ENG National Stadium Tokyo, Japan [62]
1981  BRA Flamengo 3–0 Liverpool [63]
1982  URU Peñarol 2–0 Aston Villa [64]
1983  BRA Grêmio 2–1 (a.e.t.) Hamburger SV  FRG [65]
1984  ARG Independiente 1–0 Liverpool  ENG [66]
1985  ITA Juventus 2–2 (a.e.t.) (4–2 p) Argentinos Juniors  ARG [67]
1986  ARG River Plate 1–0 Steaua București  ROU [68]
1987  POR Porto 2–1 (a.e.t.) Peñarol  URU [69]
1988  URU Nacional 2–2 (a.e.t.) (7–6 p) PSV Eindhoven  NED [70]
1989  ITA Milan 1–0 (a.e.t.) Atlético Nacional  COL [71]
1990  ITA Milan 3–0 Olimpia  PAR [72]
1991  YUG Red Star Belgrade 3–0 Colo-Colo  CHI [73]
1992  BRA São Paulo 2–1 Barcelona  ESP [74]
1993  BRA São Paulo 3–2 Milan#6  ITA [75]
1994  ARG Vélez Sársfield 2–0 Milan [76]
1995  NED Ajax 0–0 (a.e.t.) (4–3 p) Grêmio  BRA [77]
1996  ITA Juventus 1–0 River Plate  ARG [78]
1997  GER Borussia Dortmund 2–0 Cruzeiro  BRA [79]
1998  ESP Real Madrid 2–1 Vasco da Gama [80]
1999  ENG Manchester United 1–0 Palmeiras [81]
2000  ARG Boca Juniors 2–1 Real Madrid  ESP [82]
2001  GER Bayern Munich 1–0 (a.e.t.) Boca Juniors  ARG [83]
2002  ESP Real Madrid 2–0 Olimpia  PAR International Stadium Yokohama, Japan [84]
2003  ARG Boca Juniors 1–1 (a.e.t.) (3–1 p) Milan  ITA [85]
2004  POR Porto 0–0 (a.e.t.) (8–7 p) Once Caldas  COL [86]

Notes[edit]

Club World Cup era[edit]

Key to the table
dagger Match was won after extra time
double-dagger Match was won via a penalty shoot-out
Edition Season Hosts Champions Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place Ref.
1 2000  Brazil Brazil Corinthians[a] 0–0double-dagger Brazil Vasco da Gama Mexico Necaxa[b] 1–1double-dagger Spain Real Madrid [91][92]
N/A 2001  Spain Tournament cancelled [93]
2 2005  Japan Brazil São Paulo 1–0 England Liverpool Costa Rica Saprissa 3–2 Saudi Arabia Al-Ittihad [94][95]
3 2006 Brazil Internacional 1–0 Spain Barcelona Egypt Al Ahly 2–1 Mexico América [96][97]
4 2007 Italy Milan 4–2 Argentina Boca Juniors Japan Urawa Red Diamonds[c] 2–2double-dagger Tunisia Étoile du Sahel [99][100]
5 2008 England Manchester United 1–0 Ecuador LDU Quito Japan Gamba Osaka 1–0 Mexico Pachuca [101][102]
6 2009  UAE Spain Barcelona[d] 2–1dagger Argentina Estudiantes South Korea Pohang Steelers[e] 1–1double-dagger Mexico Atlante [105][106]
7 2010 Italy Internazionale 3–0 Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe Brazil Internacional 4–2 South Korea Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma [107][108]
8 2011  Japan Spain Barcelona 4–0 Brazil Santos Qatar Al Sadd[f] 0–0double-dagger Japan Kashiwa Reysol [110][111]
9 2012 Brazil Corinthians 1–0 England Chelsea Mexico Monterrey 2–0 Egypt Al Ahly [112][113]
10 2013  Morocco Germany Bayern Munich 2–0 Morocco Raja Casablanca Brazil Atlético Mineiro 3–2 China Guangzhou Evergrande [114][115]
11 2014 Spain Real Madrid 2–0 Argentina San Lorenzo New Zealand Auckland City[g] 1–1double-dagger Mexico Cruz Azul [117][118]
12 2015  Japan Spain Barcelona 3–0 Argentina River Plate Japan Sanfrecce Hiroshima 2–1 China Guangzhou Evergrande [119][120]
13 2016 Spain Real Madrid[h] 4–2dagger Japan Kashima Antlers Colombia Atlético Nacional[i] 2–2double-dagger Mexico América [123][124]
14 2017  UAE Spain Real Madrid 1–0 Brazil Grêmio Mexico Pachuca 4–1 United Arab Emirates Al-Jazira [125]
15 2018 Spain Real Madrid 4–1 United Arab Emirates Al-Ain Argentina River Plate 4–0 Japan Kashima Antlers [126]
16 2019  Qatar England Liverpool[j] 1–0dagger Brazil Flamengo Mexico Monterrey[k] 2–2double-dagger Saudi Arabia Al-Hilal [127]
17 2020 Germany Bayern Munich 1–0 Mexico UANL Egypt Al Ahly[l] 0–0double-dagger Brazil Palmeiras [127]
18 2021  UAE England Chelsea[m] 2–1 Brazil Palmeiras Egypt Al Ahly 4–0 Saudi Arabia Al-Hilal [128]

Winners[edit]

By club[edit]

In synthesis FIFA has two types of world champions, those deriving from the Intercontinental Cup and those deriving from the Club World Cup (the two competitions, albeit different, confer the same title, that of FIFA club world champions)[129][130] so in accordance to what is officially communicated by FIFA, the total count of official[131][15][132][129] world titles is as follows:[133][134][135][136][137][138][130]

Key
IC Intercontinental Cup (defunct)
CWC FIFA Club World Cup
List of world champion football clubs
Club Country IC CWC Total Years won
Real Madrid  Spain 3 4 7 1960, 1998, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018
Milan  Italy 3 1 4 1969, 1989, 1990, 2007
Bayern Munich  Germany 2 2 4 1976, 2001, 2013, 2020
Boca Juniors  Argentina 3 0 3 1977, 2000 (IC), 2003
Nacional  Uruguay 3 0 3 1971, 1980, 1988
Peñarol  Uruguay 3 0 3 1961, 1966, 1982
Internazionale  Italy 2 1 3 1964, 1965, 2010
São Paulo  Brazil 2 1 3 1992, 1993, 2005
Barcelona  Spain 0 3 3 2009, 2011, 2015
Ajax  Netherlands 2 0 2 1972, 1995
Independiente  Argentina 2 0 2 1973, 1984
Juventus  Italy 2 0 2 1985, 1996
Porto  Portugal 2 0 2 1987, 2004
Santos  Brazil 2 0 2 1962, 1963
Manchester United  England 1 1 2 1999, 2008
Corinthians  Brazil 0 2 2 2000 (CWC), 2012
Atlético Madrid  Spain 1 0 1 1974
Borussia Dortmund  Germany 1 0 1 1997
Estudiantes  Argentina 1 0 1 1968
Feyenoord  Netherlands 1 0 1 1970
Flamengo  Brazil 1 0 1 1981
Grêmio  Brazil 1 0 1 1983
Olimpia  Paraguay 1 0 1 1979
Racing Club  Argentina 1 0 1 1967
Red Star Belgrade  Yugoslavia 1 0 1 1991
River Plate  Argentina 1 0 1 1986
Vélez Sarsfield  Argentina 1 0 1 1994
Chelsea  England 0 1 1 2021
Internacional  Brazil 0 1 1 2006
Liverpool  England 0 1 1 2019

By country[edit]

Country IC CWC Total
 Spain 4 7 11
 Brazil 6 4 10
 Argentina 9 0 9
 Italy 7 2 9
 Uruguay 6 0 6
 Germany 3 2 5
 England 1 3 4
 Netherlands 3 0 3
 Portugal 2 0 2
 Paraguay 1 0 1
 Yugoslavia 1 0 1

By confederation[edit]

Confederation IC CWC Total
UEFA 21 14 35
CONMEBOL 22 4 26

All-time runners-up without title[edit]

Key
IC Intercontinental Cup (defunct)
CWC FIFA Club World Cup
List of world champion football clubs runners-up without title
Club IC CWC Total
Portugal Benfica
2
1961, 1962
Brazil Cruzeiro
2
1976, 1997
Brazil Vasco da Gama
1
1
1998, 2000 (CWC)
Brazil Palmeiras
1
1
1999, 2021
Scotland Celtic
1
1967
Greece Panathinaikos
1
1971
Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach
1
1977
Sweden Malmö FF
1
1979
England Nottingham Forest
1
1980
England Aston Villa
1
1982
Germany Hamburger SV
1
1983
Argentina Argentinos Juniors
1
1985
Romania Steaua București
1
1986
Netherlands PSV Eindhoven
1
1988
Colombia Atlético Nacional
1
1989
Chile Colo-Colo
1
1991
Colombia Once Caldas
1
2004
Ecuador LDU Quito 1 2008
Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe 1 2010
Morocco Raja Casablanca 1 2013
Argentina San Lorenzo 1 2014
Japan Kashima Antlers 1 2016
United Arab Emirates Al-Ain 1 2018
Mexico UANL 1 2020

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Score was 0–0 after 120 minutes. Corinthians won 4–3 on penalties.[89]
  2. ^ Extra time was played in the third-place match. Necaxa won 4–3 on penalties.[90]
  3. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Urawa Red Diamonds won 4–2 on penalties.[98]
  4. ^ Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes.[103]
  5. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Pohang Steelers won 4–3 on penalties.[104]
  6. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Al Sadd won 5–3 on penalties.[109]
  7. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Auckland City won 4–2 on penalties.[116]
  8. ^ Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes.[121]
  9. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Atlético Nacional won 4–3 on penalties.[122]
  10. ^ Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes.
  11. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Monterrey won 4–3 on penalties.
  12. ^ No extra time was played in the third-place match. Al Ahly won 3–2 on penalties.
  13. ^ Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes.

References[edit]

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