Listed buildings in Ellel, Lancashire

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Ellel is a civil parish in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 46 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II. The parish contains the villages of Galgate and Dolphinholme, and is otherwise rural. A high proportion of the listed buildings are country houses, smaller houses and cottages, farmhouses and farm buildings. In the 18th and 19th centuries silk spinning took place in Galgate, and two silk mills, later converted for other uses, are listed. The Lancaster Canal passes through the parish, and the junction with its Glasson Branch is also in the parish. Associated with these are listed bridges, locks, and an aqueduct. Bridges over the Rivers Wyre and Conder are also listed. Other listed buildings include a public house, churches and structures in churchyards (including a family mausoleum), a milestone, a war memorial. and boundary stones.

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Chapel Cottages
53°59′40″N 2°47′16″W / 53.99453°N 2.78782°W / 53.99453; -2.78782 (Chapel Cottages)
c. 1600 A long stone house with a slate roof in two low storeys and with irregularly-spaced openings. The doorway has long-and-short jambs. Inside the house are three cruck trusses, exposed timber-framing, and plasterwork decoration including a vine and a peacock.[2][3] II
Nook House Farmhouse
53°59′18″N 2°44′27″W / 53.98840°N 2.74092°W / 53.98840; -2.74092 (Nook House Farmhouse)
Late 17th century A stone house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and two bays. The windows have three lights and are mullioned. In the centre is a gabled porch with a stone-slate roof. On the right is a bay added in about 1800.[4] II
Welby Crag Farmhouse
54°00′15″N 2°44′29″W / 54.00408°N 2.74129°W / 54.00408; -2.74129 (Welby Crag Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The house is in sandstone and has a slate roof. It is in two storeys and has a two-bay front. The doorway has a chamfered surround, and above it is s battlemented lintel inscribed with initials and a date. On the front is a modern glazed porch.[5] II
Hay Carr Cottage (northern house)
53°58′11″N 2°47′05″W / 53.96978°N 2.78470°W / 53.96978; -2.78470 (Hay Carr Cottage)
1687 The house was altered in the 19th and 20th centuries. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys and two bays. The windows are mullioned. The central doorway has a modern porch, a moulded surround, and a shaped lintel inscribed with the date and initials.[6] II
Heversham House Farmhouse
53°59′19″N 2°44′06″W / 53.98860°N 2.73489°W / 53.98860; -2.73489 (Heversham House Farmhouse)
1698 The house is in sandstone with a slate roof, and in two storeys with an attic. The windows are mullioned. The doorway has a chamfered surround, and above it is a battlemented lintel inscribed with the date and initials. At the rear is a stair turret.[7] II
Stirzakers Farmhouse
53°58′24″N 2°46′46″W / 53.97326°N 2.77936°W / 53.97326; -2.77936 (Stirzakers Farmhouse)
c. 1700 (probable) A stone house with a stone-slate roof in two storeys. The main part has two bays, and there is another, lower, bay to the left. The windows are sashes, one of which has a mullion. There is a bolection-moulded doorcase flanked by Doric pilasters carrying a blank frieze and a moulded cornice.[8] II
31 Chapel Street
53°59′34″N 2°47′16″W / 53.99276°N 2.78786°W / 53.99276; -2.78786 (31 Chapel Street)
1701 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic, and with three bays. The windows on the front are sashes, and on the back they are mullioned. In the left bay is a former doorway, now converted into a window, above which is an inscribed lintel. Inside the house is a timber-framed partition with wattle and daub infill.[2][9] II
Bantons Farmhouse
53°58′01″N 2°44′27″W / 53.96705°N 2.74076°W / 53.96705; -2.74076 (Bantons Farmhouse)
1747 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. The windows have chamfered surrounds, and the mullions have been removed. The door has a stone surround, and above it is an oval plaque inscribed with the date and initials.[10] II
Fleece Hotel and stables
53°58′21″N 2°45′00″W / 53.97256°N 2.74995°W / 53.97256; -2.74995 (Fleece Hotel)
"The Fleece" Dolphinholme - geograph.org.uk - 524846.jpg
Mid-18th century A public house in sandstone with tiled roofs, in two storeys. The original block has two bays and mullioned windows. To the left is a former doorway, later converted into a sash window. To the left of the original block the former barn has been incorporated into the hotel; this has sash windows and a modern entrance. Further to the left are stables with a slate roof, three doorways on the ground floor, and one the upper floor reached by a flight of external cantilevered stone steps.[11] II
Hang Yeat
53°58′24″N 2°47′01″W / 53.97340°N 2.78358°W / 53.97340; -2.78358 (Hang Yeat)
18th century (probable) The house was reconstructed in the late 19th century. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys and a three-bay front. The central doorway has a chamfered surround, and the windows are mullioned.[12] II
Lower Starbank Farmhouse
53°58′52″N 2°44′01″W / 53.98102°N 2.73352°W / 53.98102; -2.73352 (Lower Starbank Farmhouse)
Mid-18th century A sandstone house with a modern tiled roof, it has two storeys and three bays. The windows have two lights and are mullioned. The doorway has a plain surround, and there are also traces of a blocked doorway.[13] II
Milestone
53°57′54″N 2°46′09″W / 53.96490°N 2.76905°W / 53.96490; -2.76905 (Milestone)
18th century The milestone is in sandstone and has a rounded top. Its front is inscribed with "6".[14] II
Dolphinholme Bridge
53°58′29″N 2°44′04″W / 53.97468°N 2.73456°W / 53.97468; -2.73456 (Dolphinholme Bridge)
1791 The bridge carries Waggon Road over the River Wyre. It is in sandstone, and consists of a single segmental arch. The bridge has alternately projecting voussoirs, a string course below a solid parapet with shaped coping, and there are two pairs of end piers. One of the voussoirs is inscribed with initials and the date.[15][16] II
Galgate Silk Mill
53°59′44″N 2°47′13″W / 53.99554°N 2.78704°W / 53.99554; -2.78704 (Galgate Silk Mill)
Galgate Silk Mill - geograph.org.uk - 524842.jpg
1792 Originally converted from a water-powered cotton mill, the silk mill was extended in the 1830s. It closed in 1971 and has since been converted into factory units. The mill is in sandstone with slate roofs. The original block has three storeys and eleven bays, with a circular stair tower. The 1830s block is in two and three storeys and has seven shallow gables facing the street.[17][18] II
19A and 19–28 Corless Cottages
53°58′27″N 2°44′21″W / 53.97429°N 2.73924°W / 53.97429; -2.73924 (19A and 19–28 Corless Cottages)
Corless Cottages (front) - geograph.org.uk - 524859.jpg
1796 A row of mill workers' houses in Dolphinholme, with a shop and post office at the left end. They are in sandstone with slate roofs, in three storeys, and each house has a single-bay front. At the left, the shop has a two-storey extension, The openings have plain surrounds and most of the windows are sashes. On the left end is a modern shop front.[15][19] II
Hay Carr Bridge (No.83)
53°58′13″N 2°47′05″W / 53.97023°N 2.78486°W / 53.97023; -2.78486 (Hay Carr Bridge)
Hay Carr Bridge no.83 - geograph.org.uk - 946190.jpg
1797 This is an accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a stepped keystone, a solid parapet, and rounded coping.[20] II
Ellel Grange Bridge (No.84)
53°58′38″N 2°47′23″W / 53.97722°N 2.78959°W / 53.97722; -2.78959 (Ellel Grange Bridge)
Ellel Grange Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 650818.jpg
1797 This is an accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal leading to Ellel Grange. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a stepped keystone, and has a weathered coping. The parapet has balusters in groups of five, and was possibly altered in about 1860.[21][22] II
Double Bridge (No.85)
53°58′57″N 2°47′32″W / 53.98241°N 2.79214°W / 53.98241; -2.79214 (Double Bridge)
Double Bridge Over Lancaster Canal - geograph.org.uk - 651311.jpg
1797 This is an accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a stepped keystone, a solid parapet, and rounded coping. It carries two tracks separated by a wall.[23] II
Galgate Bridge (No. 86)
53°59′20″N 2°47′27″W / 53.98875°N 2.79093°W / 53.98875; -2.79093 (Galgate Bridge)
Galgate Bridge 86 Lancaster Canal 5910.JPG
1797 This is an accommodation bridge over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a stepped keystone, a solid parapet, and rounded coping.[24] II
Aqueduct (No. 87)
53°59′23″N 2°47′46″W / 53.98974°N 2.79622°W / 53.98974; -2.79622 (Aqueduct)
River Conder - geograph.org.uk - 1070754.jpg
1797 The aqueduct carries the Lancaster Canal over the River Conder. It is in sandstone and consists of a single segmental arch flanked by piers. Above the arch the wall is battered with a concave plan and it has a solid parapet.[25] II
Ellel Hall Bridge (No.88)
53°59′31″N 2°47′54″W / 53.99185°N 2.79832°W / 53.99185; -2.79832 (Ellel Hall Bridge)
Ellel Hall Bridge on Lancaster Canal from the S - geograph.org.uk - 38561.jpg
1797 The bridge carries Conder Green Road over the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a triple keystone, a solid parapet, and rounded coping.[26] II
Barker House Farmhouse
54°00′14″N 2°47′20″W / 54.00395°N 2.78879°W / 54.00395; -2.78879 (Barker House Farmhouse)
c. 1800 A house with some 17th-century fabric,later incorporated into buildings of the University of Lancaster. It is in stone with a slate roof, it has two storeys and three bays. The windows are sashes. On the front is a pair of doorways; the left doorway has a plain surround, and the right doorway, now blocked and converted into a window, has a shaped inscribed lintel.[27][28] II
Stile
53°59′56″N 2°47′07″W / 53.99897°N 2.78541°W / 53.99897; -2.78541 (Stile)
c. 1800 The stile leads over the graveyard wall of a church that was demolished in 1936. It is in sandstone and consists of three steps on the north and south sides leading to a horizontal flagstone, and on the top of that is a vertical flagstone.[29] II
Sundial
53°59′56″N 2°47′06″W / 53.99900°N 2.78492°W / 53.99900; -2.78492 (Sundial)
c. 1800 The sundial is in the graveyard of a church that was demolished in 1936. It is in sandstone and stands on a base of three square steps. The shaft is in the style of the 17th-century, it is square, and has chamfered sides. On the top is a brass plate with a broken gnomon.[30] II
Junction Bridge
53°59′03″N 2°47′33″W / 53.98409°N 2.79247°W / 53.98409; -2.79247 (Junction bridge)
Canal Junction - geograph.org.uk - 651804.jpg
1823–25 A roving bridge carrying the towpath of the Lancaster Canal over the commencement of its Glasson Branch. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with chamfered voussoirs and a keystone. The bridge has a solid parapet, weathered coping, and piers at the ends.[31] II
Second Lock bridge
53°58′56″N 2°47′57″W / 53.98225°N 2.79912°W / 53.98225; -2.79912 (Second Lock bridge)
Second Lock Bridge, Ellel.jpg
1823–25 This is an accommodation bridge over the Glasson Branch of the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with a keystone, a solid parapet and piers at the ends.[32] II
Top Lock
53°59′02″N 2°47′34″W / 53.98401°N 2.79275°W / 53.98401; -2.79275 (Top Lock)
Top Lock Glasson Branch, Ellel.jpg
1823–25 The lock is on the Glasson Branch of the Lancaster Canal near its junction with the main canal. It is in sandstone and has two pairs of timber gates.[33] II
Second Lock
53°58′57″N 2°47′55″W / 53.98238°N 2.79867°W / 53.98238; -2.79867 (Second Lock)
Second Lock - geograph.org.uk - 651303.jpg
1823–25 The lock is on the Glasson Branch of the Lancaster Canal. It is in sandstone and has two pairs of timber gates.[34] II
Boundary stone
54°00′22″N 2°47′35″W / 54.00609°N 2.79316°W / 54.00609; -2.79316 (Boundary stone)
Early 19th century (probable) The stone marks the boundary with Thurnham parish. It is in sandstone and has a triangular plan, and there on inscriptions on both sides.[35] II
Bridge over River Wyre
53°57′57″N 2°44′10″W / 53.96589°N 2.73611°W / 53.96589; -2.73611 (Bridge over River Wyre)
Bridge over River Wyre near Bantons - geograph.org.uk - 1092888.jpg
Early 19th century The bridge carries the drive to Wyreside Hall over the River Wyre. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch with rusticated voussoirs and a solid parapet. The bridge is flanked by piers containing round-headed niches.[36][37] II
Corless Mill Cottage, or
Keeper's Cottage
53°58′06″N 2°44′13″W / 53.96833°N 2.73691°W / 53.96833; -2.73691 (Corless Mill Cottage)
Early 19th century A house in cottage orné style built in stone with a hipped slate roof. Both the roof and the walls are rounded at the comers. It has one storey with an attic, and is in two bays with an outshut on the right. The windows are horizontal-sliding sashes. On the east and west sides is a hipped dormer.[38] II
Galgate Old Bridge
53°59′32″N 2°47′24″W / 53.99212°N 2.78995°W / 53.99212; -2.78995 (Galgate Old Bridge)
Salford Road Bridge, Galgate.jpg
Early 19th century The bridge carries Salford Road over the River Conder. It is in sandstone and consists of a single segmental arch with a solid parapet.[39] II
Lodge, Wyreside Hall
53°57′59″N 2°44′20″W / 53.96633°N 2.73899°W / 53.96633; -2.73899 (Lodge, Wyreside Hall)
Wyreside Lodge - geograph.org.uk - 1212925.jpg
Early 19th century The lodge is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof and is in Neoclassical style. It has one storey and two bays, and a continuous entablature. On the south side is an Ionic portico with two columns and a moulded pediment, and Doric pilasters flanking the doorway. The windows are sashes.[36][40] II
1, 3 and 5 Wagon Road
53°58′30″N 2°44′05″W / 53.97505°N 2.73470°W / 53.97505; -2.73470 (1, 3 and 5 Wagon Road)
Early to mid 19th century A row of three houses in Dolphinholme, in sandstone with a slate roof, and with chamfered quoins. The houses have two storeys, and each house is in two bays. The doors and windows have plain surrounds, the windows being sashes.[41] II
Ellel Hall
53°59′33″N 2°47′42″W / 53.99238°N 2.79513°W / 53.99238; -2.79513 (Ellel Hall)
Early to mid 19th century A sandstone country house with a slate roof. It has two storeys with attics, and a symmetrical three-bay front. There are two timber dormers in the attics. The central doorway has attached Tuscan columns with fluted capitals, and a moulded pediment.[2][42] II
Ellel House
53°59′45″N 2°47′11″W / 53.99580°N 2.78626°W / 53.99580; -2.78626 (Ellel House)
Early to mid 19th century This is a stuccoed stone house with a hipped slate roof. It has two storeys and a front of six bays. The windows are sashes, and in the fourth bay is a single-story canted bay window. The doorway in the second bay has a glazed porch.[43] II
Lane House
53°59′10″N 2°47′22″W / 53.98598°N 2.78931°W / 53.98598; -2.78931 (Lane House)
Early to mid 19th century A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic. The symmetrical three-bay front has a central doorway that is flanked by attached Ionic columns and it has an entablature. The windows are sashes with plain surrounds.[2][44] II
Boundary stone
53°57′59″N 2°46′45″W / 53.96625°N 2.77914°W / 53.96625; -2.77914 (Boundary stone)
19th century The stone marks the boundary of the parish with that of Forton, and stands on the west side of the A6 road. It is in sandstone, and has a triangular plan with a chamfered top. It is inscribed with the names of the parishes.[45] II
Galgate Silk Mills
53°59′43″N 2°47′13″W / 53.99521°N 2.78699°W / 53.99521; -2.78699 (Galgate Silk Mills)
Galgate Silk Mill 5855.JPG
1852 The former silk mill has later been used as a warehouse. It is in brick with a slate roof, with three storeys and nine bays. The windows have stone lintels and small panes. To the north of the main block is a two-storey range, and between these is a boiler house with a tapering square brick chimney.[46][47] II
Ellel Grange
53°58′38″N 2°47′35″W / 53.97736°N 2.79301°W / 53.97736; -2.79301 (Ellel Grange)
Ellel Grange - geograph.org.uk - 946535.jpg
1857–59 A country house by John Weightman in Italianate style. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, and has two storeys and two towers. The larger tower is on the entrance front and is in three storeys; it contains a doorway flanked by pairs of rusticated Tuscan columns. The main part of the house is balustraded. The other tower, at the rear, is slimmer and higher, and is attached to the main house by an arcaded link.[2][48] II
Redwards
53°58′40″N 2°47′34″W / 53.97768°N 2.79271°W / 53.97768; -2.79271 (Redwards)
1857–59 This originated as part of the service accommodation for Ellel Grange, and has since been used as an old persons' home. It is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. The windows are sashes, and have architraves.[49] II
Kings Lee Chapel
53°58′33″N 2°47′30″W / 53.97578°N 2.79178°W / 53.97578; -2.79178 (Kings Lee Chapel)
Church At Ellel Grange - geograph.org.uk - 650902.jpg
1873 Also known as St Mary's Church, it was the estate church for Ellel Grange, and is now unused. The church was designed by W. & G. Audsley in High Victorian Gothic style. It is in sandstone, and has a steep slate roof. The church consists of a nave, a chancel with a round apse, a north porch with a tower, and a south organ chamber. The porch tower has a square plan, it is buttressed, and broaches to an octagon. The tower contains lancet bell openings, a stone spire with two pierced bands of red sandstone, and a small stair turret.[50][51] II*
Preston family Mausoleum
53°58′32″N 2°47′31″W / 53.97556°N 2.79181°W / 53.97556; -2.79181 (Preston family Mausoleum)
Ellel Grange Church Chapel - geograph.org.uk - 650887.jpg
1873 The mausoleum is in the churchyard of the former Church of St Mary. It was designed by W. & G. Audsley for the Preston family of nearby Ellel Grange. The mausoleum is in sandstone with a slate roof. In the east gable wall is a moulded doorway with a pointed arch containing a carving of the Resurrection in the tympanum. The four-light west window contains Geometrical tracery. Inside, there are blank arcades with pointed arches and columns with foliated capitals, some of which contain memorial tablets.[21][52] II
St Mark's Church
53°58′26″N 2°44′16″W / 53.97397°N 2.73786°W / 53.97397; -2.73786 (St Mark's Church)
St Mark's Church, Dolphinholme.jpg
1897–99 The church is in Dolphinholme, and was designed by Austin and Paley. It is in sandstone with a green slate roof. The church consists of a nave, a north aisle, a north porch, and a chancel. There is a tower at the crossing, a north transept, and a lean-to extension on the south side. The tower has a plain parapet, an embattled stair turret, and a short pyramidal roof.[15][53] II
St John's Church
53°59′46″N 2°47′08″W / 53.99614°N 2.78563°W / 53.99614; -2.78563 (St John's Church)
St John's Church, Ellel.jpg
1906–07 The church, by Austin and Paley, is in sandstone with a red tiled roof. It consists of a nave with a north clerestory, a north aisle, a tower at the crossing with a stair turret, a north transept and vestry, and a chancel. The east window contains a fusion of Decorated and Perpendicular tracery.[17][54] II
Parish of Ellel War Memorial
53°59′46″N 2°47′09″W / 53.99617°N 2.78587°W / 53.99617; -2.78587 (Ellel War Memorial)
1921 The war memorial is in the churchyard of St John's Church, it is in grey sandstone, and consists of an ornate Gothic wheelhead cross. The three upper arms of the cross have pyramidal finials, the lowest arm has an octagonal foot, and in the centre of the cross is a Lancashire rose. The cross has a square shaft, a slightly tapering plinth, and a three-stepped base. On the front of the plinth is an inscription, and on the back are the names of those lost in the First World War. The names of those lost in the Second World War are on three sides of the top step of the base.[55] II

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ a b c d e Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 285
  3. ^ Historic England & 1071762
  4. ^ Historic England & 1251497
  5. ^ Historic England & 1362504
  6. ^ Historic England & 1251451
  7. ^ Historic England & 1262778
  8. ^ Historic England & 1362503
  9. ^ Historic England & 1362506
  10. ^ Historic England & 1164126
  11. ^ Historic England & 1251449
  12. ^ Historic England & 1071761
  13. ^ Historic England & 1251453
  14. ^ Historic England & 1318201
  15. ^ a b c Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 276
  16. ^ Historic England & 1071767
  17. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 284
  18. ^ Historic England & 1164222
  19. ^ Historic England & 1071765
  20. ^ Historic England & 1262777
  21. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 286
  22. ^ Historic England & 1317881
  23. ^ Historic England & 1362483
  24. ^ Historic England & 1251450
  25. ^ Historic England & 1071798
  26. ^ Historic England & 1362508
  27. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 417
  28. ^ Historic England & 1362509
  29. ^ Historic England & 1071764
  30. ^ Historic England & 1317857
  31. ^ Historic England & 1251452
  32. ^ Historic England & 1071757
  33. ^ Historic England & 1071758
  34. ^ Historic England & 1262781
  35. ^ Historic England & 1071760
  36. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 277
  37. ^ Historic England & 1362482
  38. ^ Historic England & 1164141
  39. ^ Historic England & 1071766
  40. ^ Historic England & 1071759
  41. ^ Historic England & 1164260
  42. ^ Historic England & 1362484
  43. ^ Historic England & 1362507
  44. ^ Historic England & 1164255
  45. ^ Historic England & 1362505
  46. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 284–285
  47. ^ Historic England & 1071763
  48. ^ Historic England & 1317896
  49. ^ Historic England & 1071800
  50. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 285–286
  51. ^ Historic England & 1317926
  52. ^ Historic England & 1071799
  53. ^ Historic England & 1317860
  54. ^ Historic England & 1164237
  55. ^ Historic England & 1460475

Sources