Listed buildings in Over Wyresdale

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Over Wyresdale is a civil parish in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 53 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

The parish is mainly rural, containing several small settlements, including Abbeystead. Most of the listed buildings are houses and associated structures, farmhouses and farm buildings. The largest house in the parish is Abbeystead House; this and associated structures are listed. The other listed buildings include a former mill, a church, milestones, bridges, a school, a pound, a boundary stone, and a telephone kiosk.

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Hawthornthwaite Farmhouse
53°58′35″N 2°39′49″W / 53.97647°N 2.66370°W / 53.97647; -2.66370 (Hawthornthwaite Farmhouse)
1674 A sandstone house with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys and three bays with a rear wing. The windows are mullioned. The doorway has a chamfered surround, and a porch with monolithic sides and a roof of pitched flags.[2] II
Farm building,
Catshaw Hall Farm
53°58′35″N 2°41′32″W / 53.97642°N 2.69216°W / 53.97642; -2.69216 (Farm building, Catshaw Hall Farm)
Late 17th century (probable) A sandstone building with a stone-slate roof, it is in a single storey. In the south wall are two adjacent doorways, and in the apex of the west gable is a chamfered opening with a perch.[3] II
Eastern Barn
53°59′42″N 2°37′41″W / 53.99513°N 2.62813°W / 53.99513; -2.62813 (Eastern Barn)
Late 17th century The barn was probably originally a house. It is in sandstone with a tiled roof, and has two storeys. It contains three doorways, windows, one with a remaining mullion, and two pitching holes. To the right is an added lean-to containing a re-set stone inscribed with initials and a date.[4] II
Low Moor Head (eastern house) and barn
53°59′58″N 2°42′06″W / 53.99947°N 2.70179°W / 53.99947; -2.70179 (Low Moor Head (eastern house))
Late 17th century The house and barn are in stone with a stone-slate roof. The house has two storeys, and some of the windows have retained their mullions. On the front is a porch, and above the doorway is a re-set inscribed battlemented lintel. The barn to the east dates probably from the early 19th century; it has a wide entrance with a sliding door, doorways, and windows.[5] II
Marshaw Cottage and White Moor Cottage
53°58′33″N 2°37′30″W / 53.97584°N 2.62497°W / 53.97584; -2.62497 (Marshaw Cottage and White Moor Cottage)
Late 17th century Two stone houses with a stone-slate roof in two storeys, later altered and extended. The windows are irregularly placed, and of different types, including sash windows and some with mullions.[6] II
Lower Greenbank
53°58′58″N 2°43′29″W / 53.98272°N 2.72463°W / 53.98272; -2.72463 (Lower Greenbank)
1676 A stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic and two bays. The windows are of varying types, some are mullioned, some are sash windows, and others are modern. In the attic are two timber dormers. The doorway has a chamfered surround and a shaped inscribed lintel.[7] II
Catshaw Hall Farmhouse
53°58′35″N 2°41′33″W / 53.97632°N 2.69252°W / 53.97632; -2.69252 (Catshaw Hall Farmhouse)
1678 The house is in stone with a slate roof, and is in two storeys and two bays. The windows have mullions and transoms, and the doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed shaped lintel. To the left is an 18th-century extension with mullioned windows, and inside the house is a bressumer.[8][9] II
Boundary stone
54°00′35″N 2°42′00″W / 54.00982°N 2.69990°W / 54.00982; -2.69990 (Boundary stone)
1692 The stone marks the boundary with the parish of Quernmore. It is in sandstone and has a rhomboid plan. There are inscriptions on the top and on the southeast face,[10] II
Lower Lee (Kenyon's) Farmhouse and barn
53°59′29″N 2°39′41″W / 53.99139°N 2.66150°W / 53.99139; -2.66150 (Lower Lee (Kenyon's) Farmhouse)
1694 The house and barn are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys, and the original part has four bays. Most of the windows are sashes, and the doorway has an inscribed shaped lintel. There is an extension to the right containing pigeon holes. The barn to the right of this, contains a wide opening, windows, and ventilation slits.[11] II
Lower Castle O' Trim Farmhouse and barn
53°59′38″N 2°43′17″W / 53.99398°N 2.72135°W / 53.99398; -2.72135 (Lower Castle O' Trim Farmhouse)
1711 A stone house and barn with slate roofs. The house is pebbledashed, with two storeys and three bays. Some of the mullions have been retained in the windows, and the doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed battlemented lintel. Inside the house is a bressumer. The barn to the right has a wide entrance and a pitching hole.[12] II
Beech Farmhouse
53°59′04″N 2°42′51″W / 53.98439°N 2.71426°W / 53.98439; -2.71426 (Beech Farmhouse)
1713 A stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. The entrance was originally on the southeast front. It contains mullioned windows, and a doorway, now blocked, with an inscribed lintel. The doorway is now on the other side.[13] II
Higher Lee
53°59′45″N 2°40′04″W / 53.99576°N 2.66771°W / 53.99576; -2.66771 (Higher Lee)
Higher Lee House - geograph.org.uk - 834898.jpg
c. 1720 The house is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys with an attic, and it has a symmetrical front of five bays. The doorway has a moulded surround, and the windows on the front are sashes with architraves. On the gables are ball finials. At the rear is some re-used 17th-century material including mullioned windows, a doorway with an inscribed shaped lintel, and another wide decorated lintel.[14][15] II*
Gate piers, Higher Lee
53°59′44″N 2°40′04″W / 53.99561°N 2.66765°W / 53.99561; -2.66765 (Gate piers, Higher Lee)
Early 18th century The pair of gate piers is in sandstone. Each pier is in a square plan, and has a moulded cornice and a ball finial. [16] II
Caw Mill
53°58′46″N 2°42′07″W / 53.97939°N 2.70182°W / 53.97939; -2.70182 (Caw Mill)
Early 18th century (possible) Originally a water-powered corn mill, later used for other purposes. It is in sandstone with a roof of slate and stone-slate, and built on a slope with one storey at one end and two at the other. Its openings include a wheel opening, windows and doors (some of which are blocked), a pitching hole, and a pair of blocked wide entrances, one of which has an inscribed pier.[17] II
Outbuildings, Higher Lee
53°59′45″N 2°40′04″W / 53.99586°N 2.66774°W / 53.99586; -2.66774 (Outbuilding, Higher Lee)
Early 18th century (probable) The outbuildings were originally probably a coach house, stables and a cottage, and have since been converted for other purposes. They are in sandstone with a stone-slate roof and have two storeys. The openings include doorways, windows, pigeon holes, oval openings (now blocked), and a wide opening with a concrete lintel.[14][18] II
Outbuilding, Higher Lee
53°59′45″N 2°40′04″W / 53.99586°N 2.66774°W / 53.99586; -2.66774 (Outbuildings, Higher Lee)
Early 18th century The outbuilding is in sandstone and is without a roof.[19] II
Gornalls Farmhouse
53°59′43″N 2°37′44″W / 53.99519°N 2.62883°W / 53.99519; -2.62883 (Gornalls Farmhouse)
1730 The house is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys with an attic and two bays. The windows, formerly mullioned, have chamfered surrounds, and the doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed lintel.[20] II
Christ Church
53°59′02″N 2°41′09″W / 53.98394°N 2.68594°W / 53.98394; -2.68594 (Christ Church)
Christ Church, Over Wyresdale.jpg
1733 The church was remodelled in 1892–94 by John Douglas who also added a short chancel. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and consists of a nave, a chancel, a south porch, a north vestry, and a west tower. The chancel has diagonal buttresses, corner gargoyles, an embattled parapet, and a short set-back spire. The south doorway has a round head, Doric pilasters, and a fluted keystone.[21][22] II
Low Moor Head (south-west house)
53°59′57″N 2°42′11″W / 53.99926°N 2.70313°W / 53.99926; -2.70313 (Low Moor Head (south-west house))
Early to mid 18thcentury A sandstone house with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. Most of the windows have lost their mullions, and between the bays is a porch with an elliptical arch and a keystone.[23] II
Chapel House Farmhouse and farm building
53°59′18″N 2°41′03″W / 53.98828°N 2.68423°W / 53.98828; -2.68423 (Chapel House Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century The house and attached building are in sandstone with slate roofs. The house has two storeys and two bays. Some of the windows are mullioned; others have been altered. In the centre is a porch and doorway, and at the rear is a stair window. The extension to the left has a wide doorway and a window.[24] II
Higher Moor Head Farmhouse and barn
54°00′11″N 2°41′59″W / 54.00293°N 2.69975°W / 54.00293; -2.69975 (Higher Moor Head Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century (probable) The house and barn are in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. The house has two storeys and four bays. The windows are of different types, including sashes, and the doorway is in the third bay. The barn to the right has various openings, including doorways, windows, and pitching holes.[25] II
Low Moor Head (northwest house)
53°59′58″N 2°42′10″W / 53.99943°N 2.70274°W / 53.99943; -2.70274 (Low Moor Head (northwest house))
Mid 18th century This is a sandstone house with a slate roof in two storeys. The original house has two bays. Most of the mullions have been removed from the windows, and the doorway has long-and-short jambs and a pitched hood. To the right is a former two-bay farm building that has been incorporated into the house.[26] II
Gamekeeper's Cottage and farm building,
Lower Lee
53°59′30″N 2°39′42″W / 53.99164°N 2.66167°W / 53.99164; -2.66167 (Gamekeeper's Cottage)
Mid 18th century A house and farm building in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and four bays. Some of the windows are modern, and others are mullioned, some with the mullions removed. There are two doorways, one with a plain surround, the other with a moulded surround. The farm building has a pitching hole, and a doorway with long and short jambs.[27] II
Ouzel Thorn Farmhouse
53°59′40″N 2°38′06″W / 53.99440°N 2.63491°W / 53.99440; -2.63491 (Ouzel Thorn Farmhouse)
1761 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. The windows are sashes and in one of them the mullion has been retained. Between the bays is a 19th-century gabled porch, above which is a plaque inscribed with initials and the date.[28] II
Little Catshaw Farmhouse and barn
53°58′32″N 2°41′20″W / 53.97569°N 2.68892°W / 53.97569; -2.68892 (Little Catshaw Farmhouse)
1763 The house and barn are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and three bays. The mullions have been removed from the windows, the doorway has a plain surround, and above it is an inscribed oval plaque. The barn to the left has a wide entrance with a canopy, external steps leading to a first floor doorway, and lean-to extensions.[29] II
Ortner House and shed
53°59′03″N 2°42′50″W / 53.98410°N 2.71389°W / 53.98410; -2.71389 (Ortner House)
1769 A stuccoed stone house with a slate roof in two storeys, and with a symmetrical three-bay front. The windows are sashes with architraves. In the centre is a Doric porch with a triglyph frieze and a moulded pediment containing the date. On the right gable wall is a re-set inscribed lintel. To the left and attached by a wall is a shed incorporating a re-used doorway and a re-set inscribed plaque.[14][30] II
Keepers Cottage
53°58′56″N 2°40′11″W / 53.98233°N 2.66983°W / 53.98233; -2.66983 (Keepers Cottage)
1770 A sandstone house with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys with two bays. The windows, formerly mullioned, have plain surrounds, and the doorway has a gabled porch with an inscribed plaque above it.[31] II
Dunkenshaw and barn
53°59′44″N 2°38′59″W / 53.99548°N 2.64979°W / 53.99548; -2.64979 (Dunkenshaw)
Late 18th century The house and barn are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, the windows being sashes. The barn has a wide entrance, and a doorway with long and short jambs.[32] II
Lower Emmetts
53°59′40″N 2°38′57″W / 53.99442°N 2.64911°W / 53.99442; -2.64911 (Lower Emmetts)
Late 18th century A house in sandstone with a slate roof, in two storeys and three bays, The doors and windows have plain surrounds, most of the windows on the front being sashes. At the rear are two mullioned windows and a stair window.[33] II
Barn, Pye's Farm
53°59′43″N 2°37′50″W / 53.99530°N 2.63068°W / 53.99530; -2.63068 (Milestone)
c. 1800 (probable) A barn and shippon incorporating parts of a 17th-century house. It is in sandstone with stone-slate roof, and contains a wide entrance with a segmental arch, doorways (one with a triangular head), windows, and a pitching hole.[34] II
Milestone
53°59′24″N 2°39′26″W / 53.98996°N 2.65716°W / 53.98996; -2.65716 (Milestone)
c. 1800 The milestone is in sandstone, and has a rectangular plan and a rounded shouldered top. It face is inscribed with '7'.[35] II
Milestone
53°58′55″N 2°38′11″W / 53.98185°N 2.63640°W / 53.98185; -2.63640 (Milestone)
c. 1800 The milestone is in sandstone, and has a rectangular plan and a rounded shouldered top. It face is inscribed with '8'.[36] II
Milestone
53°58′29″N 2°37′12″W / 53.97471°N 2.62010°W / 53.97471; -2.62010 (Milestone)
c. 1800 The milestone is in sandstone, and has a rectangular plan and a rounded shouldered top. It face is inscribed with '9'.[37] II
Border Side Farmhouse and barn
53°59′02″N 2°38′31″W / 53.98387°N 2.64198°W / 53.98387; -2.64198 (Border Side Farmhouse)
Early 19th century The house and barn are in sandstone. The house has a slate roof, it is in two storeys and two bays, and has sash windows. The barn incorporates 17th-century material and has a stone-slate roof. It has a wide entrance, a blocked mullioned window, and a doorway with a shaped lintel inscribed with initials and the date 1676.[38] II
Lee Bridge
53°59′28″N 2°39′35″W / 53.99098°N 2.65971°W / 53.99098; -2.65971 (Lee Bridge)
Early 19th century The bridge carries a road over the Tarnbrook Wyre. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch and has a solid parapet with a rounded top.[39] II
Grizedale Bridge
53°59′31″N 2°39′48″W / 53.99182°N 2.66346°W / 53.99182; -2.66346 (Grizedale Bridge)
Grizedale Bridge, Over Wyresdale.jpg
Early 19th century The bridge carries Bakehouse Brow over the River Grizedale. It is in sandstone and consists of a single elliptical arch and has a solid parapet with a rounded top.[40] II
Summer house, Lower Lee
53°59′27″N 2°39′43″W / 53.99093°N 2.66186°W / 53.99093; -2.66186 (Summer house, Lower Lee)
Early 19th century The summer house is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It has a square plan and is in two storeys. There are sash windows on three sides, and on the other side external steps with an iron balustrade lead to a first floor doorway. There is another doorway on the south side.[14][41] II
Summer house, Ortner
53°59′08″N 2°42′39″W / 53.98547°N 2.71091°W / 53.98547; -2.71091 (Summer house, Ortner)
Summer House, Ortner.jpg
Early 19th century The summer house is in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It has a square plan and is in two storeys. There are windows on three sides, with plain surrounds, and on the other side external steps lead to a first floor doorway. There is another doorway on the south side.[14][42] II
Tower Lodge
53°58′46″N 2°36′18″W / 53.97940°N 2.60505°W / 53.97940; -2.60505 (Tower Lodge)
Tower Lodge, Over Wyresdale.jpg
Early 19th century A house, originally intended as a shooting lodge but never completed. It is in stone with a hipped slate roof. and is in Gothick style. The house has a rectangular plan with rounded corners, and is in a single storey. The windows and doorway have pointed heads, the windows containing Y-tracery. On the front and side are circular panels with quatrefoils.[14][43] II
Stoops Bridge
53°59′01″N 2°40′02″W / 53.98363°N 2.66735°W / 53.98363; -2.66735 (Stoops Bridge)
Stoops Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 514386.jpg
Mid 19th century The bridge carries Strait Lane over the Tarnbrook Wyre. It is in sandstone, and consists of two elliptical arches with triangular cutwaters, and has a solid parapet with a rounded top.[44] II
Gad House
53°59′17″N 2°40′00″W / 53.98804°N 2.66659°W / 53.98804; -2.66659 (Gad House)
19th century A cattle shelter in sandstone with a stone-slate roof in a single storey. It has an open front with five cylindrical pillars, and the interior has been divided into two compartments.[14][45] II
Tarnsyke Cottage
53°59′43″N 2°37′44″W / 53.99531°N 2.62899°W / 53.99531; -2.62899 (Tarnsyke Cottage)
Mid to late 19th century A house incorporating 17th-century remains, in sandstone with a roof partly in slate and partly in stone-slate. It has two storeys, and the main part has two bays, with a lower part to the right. On the front, one of the windows is a sash and the others are modern. The doorway has a battlemented lintel. At the rear are mullioned windows and a stair window.[46] II
Cawthorne Endowed School
53°58′59″N 2°40′13″W / 53.98296°N 2.67040°W / 53.98296; -2.67040 (Cawthorne Endowed School)
Cawthorne Endowed School, Abbeystead.jpg
Late 19th century The school is in sandstone with a slate roof, and is in a single storey. There are two projections toward the road, one gabled, the other smaller with a hipped roof. The windows have elliptical heads, and are mullioned or mullioned and transomed. On the west gable of the main range is a bellcote.[21][47] II
Pound
53°58′58″N 2°40′13″W / 53.98269°N 2.67041°W / 53.98269; -2.67041 (Pound)
Late 19th century The animal pound is in sandstone, and is roughly circular in plan. There is an opening on the south side.[48] II
Abbeystead
53°59′05″N 2°39′41″W / 53.98480°N 2.66143°W / 53.98480; -2.66143 (Abbeystead)
Abbeystead House (2).jpg
1885–87 A country house by Douglas and Fordham in Elizabethan style. It is in sandstone with slate roofs, in two storeys and attics, and has two main ranges at right angles. The principal range has five bays, three of them gabled with ball finials. The windows are mullioned or mullioned and transomed. The doorway has a Tudor arch with a coat of arms above, and on the east side of the house is a four-storey tower.[8][49] II
Terrace wall and steps,
Abbeystead
53°59′05″N 2°39′41″W / 53.98461°N 2.66141°W / 53.98461; -2.66141 (Terrace wall and steps, Abbeystead)
1887 (probable) The terrace retaining wall is in sandstone, and has rectangular chamfered balusters forming arches under a coping. At the ends are square piers, most with ball finials, and at the ends and in the centre are flights of steps.[50] II
Lancaster Lodge
53°59′03″N 2°39′57″W / 53.98413°N 2.66579°W / 53.98413; -2.66579 (Lancaster Lodge)
Lancaster Lodge - geograph.org.uk - 580556.jpg
1887 A lodge to Abbeystead House by Douglas and Fordham in Elizabethan style. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has an L-shaped plan with two storeys. The windows are mullioned, and the doorway has a moulded surround and a shaped lintel inscribed with the date.[8][51] II
York Lodge
53°59′12″N 2°38′57″W / 53.98657°N 2.64916°W / 53.98657; -2.64916 (York Lodge)
c. 1890 A lodge to Abbeystead House in sandstone with a hipped slate roof. It has a single storey, and contains mullioned windows. Facing the road is a hipped wing and a chamfered doorway, and facing the drive is a canted bay window.[8][52] II
Bothy Cottage and other buildings
53°58′56″N 2°40′14″W / 53.98230°N 2.67042°W / 53.98230; -2.67042 (Bothy Cottage)
c. 1890 These consist of estate workshops and living accommodation, they are in sandstone with slate roofs, and in two storeys. Bothy cottage has a wide entrance and gabled dormers. The building to the north has a doorway with a moulded surround and a shaped lintel, and on the roof is a timber louvre. On all the gables are ball finials.[53] II
Home Farmhouse and farm building
53°58′58″N 2°40′11″W / 53.98280°N 2.66977°W / 53.98280; -2.66977 (Home Farmhouse)
1891–92 A house and adjoining building by Douglas and Fordham in Elizabethan style. They are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and a projecting wing. The windows are mullioned or mullioned and transomed, and the doorway has a moulded surround and a shaped lintel inscribed with the date. The gables are coped with ball finials. There is a single-storey link to the farm building that contains two elliptical arches, a loading door, windows and doorways.[8][54] II
Post House and Farm Cottage
53°58′57″N 2°40′14″W / 53.98258°N 2.67062°W / 53.98258; -2.67062 (Post House and Farm Cottage)
1892 A pair of sandstone houses with a slate roof, incorporating 17th-century material, in two storeys with mullioned windows. The cottage forms a cross-wing to Post House. Both houses have a doorway with a moulded surround and a battlemented lintel inscribed with initials and the date.[55] II
Boundary stone
53°58′27″N 2°34′51″W / 53.97406°N 2.58075°W / 53.97406; -2.58075 (Boundary stone)
The Grey Stone of Trough - geograph.org.uk - 409720.jpg
1897 The stone marks the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Yorkshire. It is in sandstone, triangular in section, and with a sloping top. The stone carries inscriptions, including the date, the distances in miles to Whitewell, Clitheroe, Lancaster, and Bay Horse, together with the maker's name.[56] II
Telephone kiosk
53°58′58″N 2°40′15″W / 53.98264°N 2.67091°W / 53.98264; -2.67091 (Telephone kiosk)
1935 A K6 type telephone kiosk, designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. Constructed in cast iron with a square plan and a dome, it has three unperforated crowns in the top panels.[57] II

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ Historic England & 1071628
  3. ^ Historic England & 1071624
  4. ^ Historic England & 1362582
  5. ^ Historic England & 1164205
  6. ^ Historic England & 1071591
  7. ^ Historic England & 1071632
  8. ^ a b c d e Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 487
  9. ^ Historic England & 1071623
  10. ^ Historic England & 1071742
  11. ^ Historic England & 1164220
  12. ^ Historic England & 1362559
  13. ^ Historic England & 1071621
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 488
  15. ^ Historic England & 1164115
  16. ^ Historic England & 1362557
  17. ^ Historic England & 1362554
  18. ^ Historic England & 1164168
  19. ^ Historic England & 1071629
  20. ^ Historic England & 1071603
  21. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 486
  22. ^ Historic England & 1071626
  23. ^ Historic England & 1317880
  24. ^ Historic England & 1071625
  25. ^ Historic England & 1071630
  26. ^ Historic England & 1071631
  27. ^ Historic England & 1362556
  28. ^ Historic England & 1362581
  29. ^ Historic England & 1362558
  30. ^ Historic England & 1362580
  31. ^ Historic England & 1071600
  32. ^ Historic England & 1362555
  33. ^ Historic England & 1164210
  34. ^ Historic England & 1164391
  35. ^ Historic England & 1071593
  36. ^ Historic England & 1071592
  37. ^ Historic England & 1362579
  38. ^ Historic England & 1071622
  39. ^ Historic England & 1164194
  40. ^ Historic England & 1164096
  41. ^ Historic England & 1071633
  42. ^ Historic England & 1071594
  43. ^ Historic England & 1071595
  44. ^ Historic England & 1164348
  45. ^ Historic England & 1071627
  46. ^ Historic England & 1164413
  47. ^ Historic England & 1071602
  48. ^ Historic England & 1164366
  49. ^ Historic England & 1071597
  50. ^ Historic England & 1317819
  51. ^ Historic England & 1071598
  52. ^ Historic England & 1071596
  53. ^ Historic England & 1317797
  54. ^ Historic England & 1071599
  55. ^ Historic England & 1071601
  56. ^ Historic England & 1362241
  57. ^ Historic England & 1250811

Sources