Listed buildings in Rochdale

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Rochdale is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England, and it is unparished. The town and the surrounding countryside contain 134 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, four are listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, four are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Until the coming of the Industrial Revolution the area was largely rural and agricultural, and some of the agricultural buildings were grouped into settlements known as folds. Most of the earlier listed buildings are houses and associated structures, farmhouses and farm buildings. Industry came in the form of textiles, both wool and cotton, and it was initially carried out in domestic premises, and many of the listed buildings of this time are houses, often with three storeys and rows of multi-light mullioned weavers' workshop windows in the upper floors. The Rochdale Canal passes through the town, and some of the bridges and locks associated with it are listed. The Co-operative movement originated in the town, and its first shop, now a museum, is listed. The other listed buildings include churches and items in churchyards, public houses, banks, a market cross, textile mills, the entrance to the cemetery, a school, public buildings, statues, bridges, and war memorials.

Key[edit]

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Grade Criteria[1]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
St Chad's Church
53°36′53″N 2°09′28″W / 53.61477°N 2.15775°W / 53.61477; -2.15775 (St Chad's Church)
St Chad's church, Rochdale.JPG
13th century The oldest part of the church is the lower part of the tower, and most of the body of the church dates from the 14th–16th centuries. In 1854–55 Joseph Clarke rebuilt the nave roof and the north aisle, in 1873 W. H. Crossland added the porch and the top stage of the tower, with gargoyles carved by Thomas Earp, and 1884–85 the chancel was rebuilt and extended by J. S. Crowther, again with carvings by Earp. The older parts of the church are in gritstone, the later work is in sandstone, and the roof is in slate and copper. The church consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a south porch, a chancel with north and south chapels, and a west tower. The tower has three stages, angle buttresss, and an embattled parapet with crocketed pinnacles. The parapets of the body of the church are also embattled and have crocketed pinnacles.[2][3] II*
Hill House
53°36′39″N 2°11′12″W / 53.61090°N 2.18676°W / 53.61090; -2.18676 (Hill House)
1609 A rendered stone house that has a tiled roof with coped gables, and two storeys. There is a main range, a later cross-wing to the right, a parallel rear wing, and a garage extension. In the angle is a porch that has a doorway with a chamfered surround and a dated and initialled lintel, and the windows are mullioned.[4] II
Smallshaw Farmhouse
53°38′23″N 2°11′35″W / 53.63979°N 2.19299°W / 53.63979; -2.19299 (Smallshaw Farmhouse)
1622 A stone farmhouse on a plinth with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, three bays, and a lean-to extension to the left. On the front is a two-storey porch, the upper floor slightly jettied, with a moulded opening and a dated and initialled lintel. The windows are mullioned and those in the ground floor have hood moulds with spiral stops.[5][6] II
Sundial, Ashworth Hall
53°36′56″N 2°13′42″W / 53.61566°N 2.22824°W / 53.61566; -2.22824 (Sundial, Ashworth Hall)
1641 The sundial is in the courtyard of Ashworth Hall. It is in stone and consists of an octagonal baluster on a pedestal. On the top is a copper dial and gnomon.[7] II
Oakenrod Hall
53°36′50″N 2°10′27″W / 53.61384°N 2.17420°W / 53.61384; -2.17420 (Oakenrod Hall)
c. 1650 A wing was added in the early 18th century, and other wings later. The house is in stone with one of the rear wings in brick, and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, a main range of five bays, a protruding left wing, rear wings to the right, and diagonally to the left. The porch has a coped gable, and the windows are mullioned.[8] II
Thrum Hall Cottages
53°38′04″N 2°10′05″W / 53.63444°N 2.16817°W / 53.63444; -2.16817 (Thrum Hall Cottages)
1650 A stone house, at one time three cottages, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, three bays, and an outshut and a gabled wing at the rear. In the centre is a doorway with a chamfered surround and a Tudor arched dated and initialled lintel, the windows are mullioned, and in the right gable end is a porch.[9] II
246, 248 and 250 Edenfield Road
53°37′20″N 2°11′00″W / 53.62210°N 2.18336°W / 53.62210; -2.18336 (246, 248 and 250 Edenfield Road)
Mid 17th century Originally one house, later divided into three, it is in stone with quoins and a slate roof. There are two storeys, and each house has one bay. The doorways have monolithic jambs, the windows are mullioned, and above the ground floor windows is a continuous hood mould.[10] II
32, 34 and 36 Falinge Fold
53°37′32″N 2°10′11″W / 53.62564°N 2.16966°W / 53.62564; -2.16966 (32, 34 and 36 Falinge Fold)
Mid 17th century A stone house and byre, later two cottages, and a brick extension added to the left in about 1800. There is a stone-slate roof, two storeys and four bays. The doorway on the front has a chamfered surround and a slightly pointed lintel. The windows in the original part are mullioned and in the extension they are sashes. Inside are remnants of timber framed cross-walls.[11][12] II
22 and 24 Lower Tenterfield
53°37′39″N 2°13′04″W / 53.62743°N 2.21783°W / 53.62743; -2.21783 (22 and 24 Lower Tenterfield)
Mid 17th century A farmhouse, later divided into two dwellings, it is in stone with a stone-slate roof, and two storeys. The house was extended in 1777, making the original part a cross-wing. The original part is on a plinth, it has quoins, two bays, mullioned windows with hood moulds, and a taking-in door in the left side. The later part also has two bays, a central doorway with monolithic jambs, mullioned windows, a datestone, and a blocked taking-in door in the right gable end.[13] II
Ashworth Hall
53°36′56″N 2°13′41″W / 53.61563°N 2.22805°W / 53.61563; -2.22805 (Ashworth Hall)
17th century A house, possibly with an earlier core, divided into three dwellings. It is mainly in stone on a stone plinth, with some brick, stone dressings, and a stone-slate roof. It has a rectangular plan, three storeys with attics and a basement, and five bays. The main door opens into an enclosed courtyard, and has panelled pilasters, a three-pane fanlight, and a hood. The windows vary; some are casements and others are sashes, and in the south gable is a mullioned window.[14][15] II
Sand Hole Farmhouse
53°35′23″N 2°09′23″W / 53.58963°N 2.15627°W / 53.58963; -2.15627 (Sand Hole Farmhouse)
17th century The house is in sandstone, partly rendered, with a roof partly of Welsh slate and partly of stone flags. There are two storeys, a central doorway with a modern lean-to porch, and a projecting west wing. The windows are mullioned, some with hood moulds.[16] II
Schofield Farm and The Three Owls Bird Sanctuary
53°37′31″N 2°13′15″W / 53.62534°N 2.22094°W / 53.62534; -2.22094 (Schofield Farm)
Mid 17th century The house and the barn at the rear, which has since been used for other purposes, are in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. The house has two storeys, two bays, and a central doorway. The windows are mullioned, including a ten-light workshop window in the upper floor. The barn has a semicircular cart entrance flanked by doors.[17] II
Ellenrod Farmhouse
53°37′41″N 2°11′28″W / 53.62817°N 2.19115°W / 53.62817; -2.19115 (Ellenrod Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The farmhouse was refronted in the late 19th century. It is in stone on a plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys and two bays, with central doorways at the front and rear. The jambs and head of the rear doorway are moulded, and most of the windows are mullioned.[18] II
Manor Farmhouse
53°37′29″N 2°13′17″W / 53.62481°N 2.22141°W / 53.62481; -2.22141 (Manor Farmhouse)
Late 17th century Originally a chapel, later a private house, it is in stone on a plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and mullioned windows, some with hood moulds.[19] II
Wolstenholme Fold Farmhouse and barn
53°37′32″N 2°13′17″W / 53.62564°N 2.22138°W / 53.62564; -2.22138 (Wolstenholme Fold Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The barn is dated 1721, and has been incorporated into the house, and the building is in stone with slate roofs. The house has two storeys and two bays, the barn is at right angles to the left, there is a single-storey wing to the right, and an outshut to the left. The doorway has monolithic jambs and lintel, and the windows are mullioned. In the former barn is a semicircular opening with a dated keystone.[20] II
6, 8 and 10 Harridge Street
53°38′04″N 2°10′45″W / 53.63454°N 2.17930°W / 53.63454; -2.17930 (6, 8 and 10 Harridge Street)
1678 Originally one house with cross-wings, later three cottages, they are in stone on a projecting plinth with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys and a rear outshut. The main doorway has a chamfered porch and a dated and initialled lintel, and the doorway to the left has chamfered jambs and a flattened triangular head. Some of the windows are mullioned, and others are replacements.[21] II
Stocks
53°36′52″N 2°09′27″W / 53.61446°N 2.15741°W / 53.61446; -2.15741 (Stocks)
Stocks, Rochdale.jpg
1688 The stocks were moved to their present location at the entrance to the churchyard of St Chad's Church in 1891. They consist of stone stock-ends with chamfered corners, semicircular heads and an inscription, and contain replaced timber foot restraints and benches.[22] II
Fern Hill First Farmhouse
53°38′04″N 2°11′39″W / 53.63458°N 2.19414°W / 53.63458; -2.19414 (Fern Hill First Farmhouse)
1691 The main range was added at right angles in the 18th century, making the original part a cross-wing. The farmhouse is in stone and has a stone-slate roof with coped gables. The cross-wing is on a plinth, and has quoins and mullioned windows. The later part has a doorway with square-cut jambs and a lintel. To the right is a projecting single-storey porch with an ogee-shaped lintel and a panel above. The mullions have been removed from the windows.[23] II
Fisherfield Farmhouse
53°37′49″N 2°11′27″W / 53.63024°N 2.19094°W / 53.63024; -2.19094 (Fisherfield Farmhouse)
1692 A stone farmhouse on a plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and an aisle at the rear. The doorway has a chamfered surround, and a slightly pointed lintel with initials and a date. The windows are mullioned, those in the ground floor having hood moulds with spiral stops.[24] II
Bank House Farmhouse
53°37′55″N 2°12′18″W / 53.63196°N 2.20494°W / 53.63196; -2.20494 (Bank House Farmhouse)
1694 A stone farmhouse on a plinth, with quoins, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. There are two storeys and three bays. There are two doorways with monolithic jambs and lintels. The windows are mullioned, those in the upper floor having hood moulds with spiral stops. In the right gable is a dovecote, and at the rear is a cross-window and a window with a semicircular head.[25] II
Lloyd's Bank
53°37′03″N 2°09′31″W / 53.61738°N 2.15868°W / 53.61738; -2.15868 (Lloyd's Bank)
Lloyd's Bank, Rochdale.jpg
1708 A hotel on a corner site, later a bank, it is in brick with a stone ground floor and dressings and a roof in slate and copper. There are three storeys, four bays on Yorkshire Street, two on former Lord Street, and a curved bay on the corner. The ground floor is rusticated and contains windows and a doorway on the corner, all with flat heads voussoirs and keystones. The upper floor have fluted Ionic pilasters between the bays, which contain flat-headed windows with architraves and keystones. Below the windows in the middle floor are [[molding (decorative)|moulded] panels, and in the upper floor is blind balustrading. There are stone cornices between the floors, and a timber modillion eaves cornice. On the top is a pitched roof with a dentilled gables, and a balcony flanked by acorn vases on pedestals.[26][27] II
Woodhouse East Cottage and attached cottages
53°37′50″N 2°12′52″W / 53.63058°N 2.21455°W / 53.63058; -2.21455 (Woodhouse East Cottage)
1709 A house with a gabled cross-wing to the left, in stone with quoins and a stone-slate roof. There are two storeys, a main range with three bays, a single-storey extension to the left, and a two-storey rear wing. In the angle is a porch with a coped gable and ball finials, and the windows are mullioned with hood moulds.[28] II
Duffins Cottage
53°37′58″N 2°10′35″W / 53.63286°N 2.17642°W / 53.63286; -2.17642 (Duffins Cottage)
1717 A stone house on a plinth with a stone-slate roof, two storeys, and a lean-to extension at the rear. There is one mullioned window, mullions have been removed from the other windows, and a porch was added in the 20th century.[29] II
Old Falinge
53°37′30″N 2°10′15″W / 53.62513°N 2.17075°W / 53.62513; -2.17075 (Old Falinge)
1721 A stone house, originally with three bays, a bay was added to the left in the 18th century, and a rear wing in brick. It has two storeys with attics, a modillion eaves cornice, and a stone-slate roof with coped gables. The doorway has a moulded surround and an initialled and dated lintel, and the windows are mullioned and transomed.[11][30] II
Crossfield Farm and Cottage
53°38′20″N 2°10′24″W / 53.63890°N 2.17340°W / 53.63890; -2.17340 (Crossfield Farm and Cottage)
1723 A farmhouse, later divided into two dwellings, it is in stone with a stone-slate roof and has two storeys. The building has a main range, a cross-wing to the right forming the cottage, and a former separate outbuilding to the left incorporated into the house, and joined to it by a single-storey passage. Most of the windows are mullioned.[31] II
Rochdale Museum, The Old Vicarage
53°36′52″N 2°09′31″W / 53.61455°N 2.15853°W / 53.61455; -2.15853 (Rochdale Museum, The Old Vicarage)
Rochdale Vicarage.jpg
c. 1724 The vicarage, later used as a museum, was altered in about 1820. It is in brick with a stone basement, stone dressings quoins, a wooden modillion eaves cornice, and has roofs of stone-slate and 20th-century tiles. The main block has two storeys with attics and two basement storeys, a front of five bays, a two-bay extension to the left and a gabled single-storey extension to the right. The doorway has a fanlight and a segmental hood with a carved shell and a cherub on console brackets. The windows are ashes with keystones, and there is a square bay window in the left extension. At the rear are re-used mullioned windows and a stair bay.[32][33] II
Fern Hill Cottage
53°38′04″N 2°11′40″W / 53.63455°N 2.19450°W / 53.63455; -2.19450 (Fern Hill Cottage)
Early 18th century A stone cottage on a plinth, with quoins, a stone-slate roof, two storeys and two bays. On the front is a large gabled porch with a chamfered doorway and an owl hole. On the front are mullioned windows, and at the sides and rear they have been replaced by 20th-century casements.[34] II
Egerton Arms
53°37′17″N 2°13′39″W / 53.62138°N 2.22739°W / 53.62138; -2.22739 (Egerton Arms)
Former Edgerton Arms, Chapel Lane, Ashworth - geograph.org.uk - 939335.jpg
Early to mid 18th century The former public house is in stone on a plinth, with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It has a double-depth plan and two storeys, and the windows are mullioned.[a][35] II
Yates's Wine Lodge
53°37′01″N 2°09′32″W / 53.61690°N 2.15886°W / 53.61690; -2.15886 (Egerton Arms)
1749 A restaurant that was later extended, with the original part facing Yorkshire Street, and the later part, dated 1911, facing Newgate. The building has a cranked plan and a slate roof. The Yorkshire Street face is in brick with stone dressings, a modillion eaves cornice, three storeys, five bays, a central doorway, a shop front to the right, and elsewhere are sash windows with keystones. The Newgate face is in ashlar stone and in Edwardian Baroque style. It has a single storey, five bays, a doorway in the right bay, and semicircular-headed windows in the other bays, all with keystones. There are three gables with semicircular pediments, the largest gable above the central three bays. The pediments contain cartouches, below them is an inscribed frieze, and flanking this are four pilasters.[26][36] II
Ashworth Hall Estate Cottages and barn
53°36′57″N 2°13′42″W / 53.61573°N 2.22847°W / 53.61573; -2.22847 (Ashworth Hall Estate Cottages)
Ashworth Fold - geograph.org.uk - 1770931.jpg
18th century A pair of cottages and a barn in stone with brick at the rear, evidence of timber framing, and stone-slate roofs. Between the cottages is an arched entrance to Ashworth Hall. The cottages have quoins, two storeys, two bays each, doorways with monolithic jambs, casement windows, and an ornate ball finial. The barn to the right has two cart openings with a lean-to between, a cow house with a hay loft above, circular pitching holes with moulded architraves, ventilation slots, and an owl hole.[14][37] II
Ashworth Fold Farmhouse
53°36′56″N 2°13′44″W / 53.61559°N 2.22886°W / 53.61559; -2.22886 (Ashworth Fold Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century A stone farmhouse that has a stone-slate roof with stone ridge tiles. There is a double-depth plan, two storeys, three bays, and a single-story lean-to at the rear. It has a central doorway and mullioned windows.[14][38] II
Barn to north of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse
53°36′58″N 2°13′42″W / 53.61624°N 2.22847°W / 53.61624; -2.22847 (Barn to north of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century The long barn and associated buildings are partly in stone and partly in brick, they have roofs partly in slate and partly in stone-slate, and there are two parallel ranges. The openings, some of which are blocked, include a segmental-headed cart entry with voussoirs and a keystone, a semicircular-headed barn door, square pitching holes, windows and other cart entries, and an owl hole in the right gable.[39] II
Market Cross
53°36′55″N 2°09′28″W / 53.61530°N 2.15786°W / 53.61530; -2.15786 (Market Cross)
18th century (probable) The market cross is in stone and consists of a tall shaft on a moulded base. On the top are a cornice and a ball finial replacing the original cross.[40] II
Healey Hall
53°38′19″N 2°10′50″W / 53.63859°N 2.18064°W / 53.63859; -2.18064 (Healey Hall)
1774 A country house in ashlar stone with a sill band, a cornice, a parapet, and a hipped roof. It has two storeys and a front of seven bays, a single-storey wing to the side, and a rear wing. In the centre is a doorway with Roman Doric attached columns, an entablature, a frieze, and a pediment with carving in the tympanum. The door has a semicircular head, a fanlight and a keystone. Above the central three bays is a pediment with an armorial in the tympanum. At the rear is a Palladian window and dormers.[11][41] II
128 Yorkshire Street
53°37′10″N 2°09′17″W / 53.61946°N 2.15464°W / 53.61946; -2.15464 (128 Yorkshire Street)
Late 18th century A house, later used as offices, and altered in about 1900. It is in brick at the front with quoins, sandstone at the rear, and has a slate roof. There are two storeys, two bays, and a 19th-century extension. In the centre is a doorway with an architrave, a frieze and a cornice. In the upper floor of the right bay is a canted oriel window, and at the rear is a canted bay window; the other windows are sashes.[42] II
Falinge Park Hall façade and pavilions
53°37′25″N 2°09′54″W / 53.62360°N 2.16500°W / 53.62360; -2.16500 (Falinge Park Hall)
Late 18th century All that remains of a country house are its façade, one bay of each side wall, flanking pavilions, and passages joining them to the side walls, all in ashlar stone. The façade has a plinth, bands, a modillion cornice, a parapet, and a pediment with a floral cartouche in relief. There are two storeys and five bays, the middle three bays projecting under a pediment, and a central Ionic porch with two detached columns, four pilasters, an entablature, and a fanlight. The linking passages have three bays, the central bay containing a door with an architrave, and the outer bays with arched recesses. The pavilions each has a three-light window with Doric pilasters, an elliptical tympanum, a cornice, a parapet, and a hipped roof.[11][43] II
Mount Cottage
53°38′11″N 2°10′46″W / 53.63629°N 2.17938°W / 53.63629; -2.17938 (Mount Cottage)
Late 18th century The house was extended to the right in the mid-19th century, it is in stone with stone-slate roofs, and has two storeys. The original part has three bays, an eaves frieze, and a cornice. The central doorway has a moulded architrave, and the windows are sashes. The extension is taller with three bays, the first bay projects and contains a rusticated canted bay window with a parapet. The other bays have an arched carriage entry and sash windows, and at the rear is a stair window.[44] II
The Reed Hotel
53°37′08″N 2°09′26″W / 53.61883°N 2.15724°W / 53.61883; -2.15724 (The Reed Hotel)
The Reed, Rochdale.jpg
Late 18th century A public house in brick with stone dressings and a hipped slate roof. It has a square plan, with three storeys and a basement, and three bays on each front. The central doorway has pilaster, a cornice and a fanlight, and the windows are sashes with wedge lintels.[45] II
Sundial, St Chad's Church
53°36′52″N 2°09′28″W / 53.61445°N 2.15790°W / 53.61445; -2.15790 (Sundial, St Chad's Church)
1783 The sundial is in the churchyard of St Chad's Church. It is in stone and consists of a baluster shaft on a circular plinth. The dial is missing.[46] II
33 and 35 Broad Lane and boundary wall
53°35′56″N 2°08′35″W / 53.59892°N 2.14292°W / 53.59892; -2.14292 (33 and 35 Broad Lane)
Weavers' Cottages, Broad Lane, Rochdale - geograph.org.uk - 83813.jpg
1787 A pair of stone houses with quoins, sill bands, and a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys and one bay each. The doorways on the right have monolithic jambs and lintels. The windows are mullioned; in the ground floor the window has three lights, and in the upper floors there are six- and eight-light workshop windows. To the right is a wall constructed from large sandstone flags set into the ground and joined by circular metal plates bolted together. The stones are about 1.75 metres (5 ft 9 in) high, and the wall that surrounds a triangular garden is about 80 metres (260 ft) long.[47][48] II
St James' Church, Ashworth
53°37′17″N 2°13′37″W / 53.62142°N 2.22697°W / 53.62142; -2.22697 (St James' Church)
St James Church, Ashworth, Rochdale - geograph.org.uk - 939323.jpg
1789 A stone church with quoins and a stone-slate roof with a cross finial. It has a rectangular plan with a small north vestry. At the west end are two semicircular-arched doorways with square jambs, a keystone and a fanlight. There are two tiers of windows with semicircular heads, impost blocks, and keystones, containing Y-tracery, and the east window has three lights.[49][50] II
61–73 Broad Lane
53°35′58″N 2°08′29″W / 53.59931°N 2.14147°W / 53.59931; -2.14147 (61–73 Broad Lane)
c. 1790 A terrace of seven stone houses, possibly originally back-to-back houses, with sill bands, and a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys and one bay each. The doorways on the right have monolithic jambs and lintels. The windows are mullioned; in the ground floor they have three or four lights, and in the upper storeys are multi-light workshop windows.[51] II
Standrings House
53°37′17″N 2°11′55″W / 53.62132°N 2.19857°W / 53.62132; -2.19857 (Standrings House)
1791 A stone house with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It has two storeys, two bays, a parallel rear range for part of its length, and a single-storey porch. The windows are mullioned.[52] II
170, 172 & 174 Yorkshire Street
53°37′13″N 2°09′10″W / 53.62016°N 2.15264°W / 53.62016; -2.15264 (170, 172 & 174 Yorkshire Street)
1793 The house was extended in about 1830, and has since been converted into flats. It is in brick with stone dressings and hipped slate roofs. There are two storeys, a main block of five bays on a stone plinth, with a one-bay extension to the right and a three-bay extension to the left. The doorway in the centre of the main block has a Roman Doric doorcase with a fanlight and an open pediment. In the extensions, the doors have semicircular heads, fanlights, consoles, and consoles. The windows are sashes with flat brick arches.[53] II
Coppy Bridge
53°37′03″N 2°07′38″W / 53.61749°N 2.12715°W / 53.61749; -2.12715 (Coppy Bridge)
Coppy Bridge, Rochdale.jpg
Between 1794 and 1804 The bridge, No. 57 over the Rochdale Canal, carries a road. It is in stone, and consists of a single elliptical arch, with a band, a keystone, and a coped parapet.[54] II
Lock No. 49 (Moss Upper Lock)
53°36′30″N 2°08′40″W / 53.60828°N 2.14431°W / 53.60828; -2.14431 (Lock No. 49)
Moss Upper Lock No 49, Rochdale Canal - geograph.org.uk - 847025.jpg
Between 1794 and 1804 The lock is in dressed stone and has double lower-gates. The winding gear remains on one side.[55] II
Lock No. 50 (Moss Lower Lock)
53°36′28″N 2°08′50″W / 53.60771°N 2.14722°W / 53.60771; -2.14722 (Lock No. 50)
Moss Lower Lock No 50, Rochdale Canal - geograph.org.uk - 847019.jpg
Between 1794 and 1804 The lock is in dressed stone and has double lower-gates. The mouth has cast iron lipping.[56] II
Lock No. 52 and towpath bridge
53°35′21″N 2°10′42″W / 53.58924°N 2.17821°W / 53.58924; -2.17821 (Lock No. 52 and bridge)
Lock 52 Rochdale Canal Castleton - geograph.org.uk - 1671178.jpg
Between 1794 and 1804 The lock is in dressed stone and has double upper-gates. At the south is a roving bridge with a single segmental arch.[57] II
Lock No. 53
53°35′15″N 2°10′42″W / 53.58762°N 2.17835°W / 53.58762; -2.17835 (Lock No. 53)
Old Lock (ex no 53) Rochdale Canal near Castleton - geograph.org.uk - 1670903.jpg
Between 1794 and 1804 The lock is in dressed stone and has cast iron lipping on the mouth. It is no longer in use.[58] II
Owd Betts Public House
53°38′26″N 2°15′33″W / 53.64065°N 2.25909°W / 53.64065; -2.25909 (Owd Betts Public House)
Owd Betts - geograph.org.uk - 1705595.jpg
1796 A farmhouse, later a public house, in stone with a slate roof. There are two storeys, three bays, an outshut to the rear right, and a 20th-century rear extension. On the front is a 20th-century porch with monolithic jambs and lintel. The windows are mullioned, some containing casements and others sashes.[59] II
31 Broad Lane
53°35′56″N 2°08′35″W / 53.59893°N 2.14304°W / 53.59893; -2.14304 (31 Broad Lane)
Weavers' Cottages, Broad Lane, Rochdale - geograph.org.uk - 83813.jpg
c. 1800 A stone house with quoins, sill bands, and a stone-slate roof. It has a double-depth plan, three storeys and one bay. The doorway on the right has monolithic jambs and lintel. The windows are mullioned; in the ground floor the window has three lights with sliding sashes, and in the upper floors there are eight-light workshop windows.[47][60] II
75 and 77 Broad Lane
53°35′58″N 2°08′28″W / 53.59942°N 2.14120°W / 53.59942; -2.14120 (75 and 77 Broad Lane)
c. 1800 A pair of stone houses with a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys and one bay each. The doorways have stone surrounds, fanlights and cornices. The windows were originally mullioned; in the ground floor they have been replaced by sashes, and in the upper floors some lights have been blocked.[61] II
190, 191 and 192 Dewhirst Road
53°38′17″N 2°09′20″W / 53.63819°N 2.15557°W / 53.63819; -2.15557 (190, 191 and 192 Dewhirst Road)
c. 1800 A row of three stone houses with a roof partly of stone-slate and partly of 20th-century tiles. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys, and one bay each. The doorways have square-cut jambs and lintels, One bay window has been inserted, and the other windows are mullioned, those in the upper two floors being multi-light workshop windows.[62] II
532 and 534 Edenfield Road
53°37′21″N 2°11′50″W / 53.62261°N 2.19709°W / 53.62261; -2.19709 (532 and 534 Edenfield Road)
c. 1800 A pair of stone cottages with a stone-slate roof. They have three storeys, and each cottage has one bay. The doorways have square-cut surrounds, and the windows are mullioned, those in the upper two floors being five and seven-light workshop windows.[63] II
303, 305, and 305a Milnrow Road
53°36′58″N 2°07′59″W / 53.61601°N 2.13303°W / 53.61601; -2.13303 (303, 305, and 305a Milnrow Road)
c. 1800 A pair of stone houses with a slate roof, three storeys and a double-depth plan. No. 303 has one bay, No. 305 has three, and the doorways have square-cut monolithic jambs and lintels. In the ground floor are square windows, and the upper floors contain multi-light workshop windows. At the rear are similar windows, quoins, and an arched carriage entry with voussoirs.[64] II
144–148 Syke Road
53°38′08″N 2°09′12″W / 53.63554°N 2.15337°W / 53.63554; -2.15337 (144–148 Syke Road)
c. 1800 A row of five stone cottages with quoins, and a roof mainly of stone-slate and some tiles. There are two storeys, a double-depth plan, and each cottage has one bay. The doorways have square-cut jambs and lintels, and the windows are mullioned.[65] II
149 and 150 Syke Road
53°38′08″N 2°09′12″W / 53.63564°N 2.15346°W / 53.63564; -2.15346 (149 and 150 Syke Road)
c. 1800 A pair of stone cottages with a slate roof, a double-depth plan, two storeys, and one bay each. The doorways have monolithic jambs and lintels, and the windows are mullioned.[66] II
Nos. 188A, 190, 190A, 192, and 194 Yorkshire Street
53°37′14″N 2°09′08″W / 53.62061°N 2.15210°W / 53.62061; -2.15210 (Nos. 188A, 190, 190A, 192, and 194 Yorkshire Street)
c. 1800 A terrace of brick houses with stone dressings and a stone-slate roof, later converted into flats. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys, and a total of nine bays. Each doorway has a stuccoed surround and cornice, and a fanlight. The windows are sashes with brick arches, keystones, and stone sills. At the rear of No. 190 is a two-storey octagonal bay window.[67] II
31 Toad Lane
53°37′07″N 2°09′34″W / 53.61869°N 2.15937°W / 53.61869; -2.15937 (31 Toad Lane)
Rochdale Pioneers Museum D 29 July 2017.jpg
c. 1800 Originally a house, then in 1844 converted to become the first shop in the Co-operative movement, and subsequently a museum. It is in brick with stone dressings and a stone-slate roof, hipped at the front, and gabled at the rear. There are three storeys and three bays. In the ground floor is a central doorway flanked by bay windows, and in the upper floors are sash windows with wedge lintels.[26][68] II
Former Royds Bank
53°37′03″N 2°09′26″W / 53.61745°N 2.15723°W / 53.61745; -2.15723 (Former Royds Bank)
RBS, Rochdale.jpg
c. 1800 The bank originated as single-bay building which was extended in Greek Revival style in 1879, and redesigned and refronted in Neoclassical style in 1913–14. The original building is in brick, the 1879 extension in sandstone, and the refronting in Portland stone; the roof is slated. The main block has two storeys and five bays on a plinth with rusticated quoins. At the top is a dentilled eaves cornice with a parapet and a central pediment containing a carved eagle in relief. At the front is a semicircular porch with Ionic columns and a deep entablature. In the ground floor are rectangular windows with moulded frames and keystones, and the windows in the upper floor have triangular pediments.[69][70] II
Bamford United Reformed Church
53°36′33″N 2°12′50″W / 53.60927°N 2.21376°W / 53.60927; -2.21376 (Bamford United Reformed Church)
Bamford Chapel (United Reformed Church) - geograph.org.uk - 448078.jpg
1801 The chapel is the earlier, the Sunday school was added in 1861; both are in stone with slate roofs, and the chapel has a chancel extension in brick. The chapel has three coped gables and a gabled porch, with buttresses between the gables rising to pinnacles. The windows are lancets with hood moulds, and the doorway has a four-centred arched head. The school has quoins and mullioned and transomed windows. Inside the chapel is a gallery on three sides.[71][72] II
107 and 109 Halifax Road
53°37′36″N 2°08′34″W / 53.62671°N 2.14269°W / 53.62671; -2.14269 (107 and 109 Halifax Road)
c. 1810 Originally four back-to-back houses, later converted into two houses, they are in brick with stone dressings and a stone-slate roof. There are three storeys and basements, and each house has one bay. Steps with railings lead up to the doorways that have monolithic jambs and lintels. The windows have been altered, but in the top floor are five-light former workshop windows.[73] II
36 Meanwood Brow
53°37′21″N 2°10′30″W / 53.62238°N 2.17499°W / 53.62238; -2.17499 (36 Meanwood Brow)
c. 1810 A stone house with quoins and a stone-slate roof. It has a double-depth plan, two storeys, one bay, and a rear outshut. The doorway and windows have square-cut monolithic jambs and lintels, and the windows are mullioned, including a seven-light workshop window in the upper floor.[74] II
394, 396, 398 and 400 Shawclough Road
53°38′08″N 2°10′46″W / 53.63565°N 2.17940°W / 53.63565; -2.17940 (394, 396, 398 and 400 Shawclough Road)
c. 1810 A row of four stone houses with moulded eaves brackets, and a stone-slate roof. Each house has a double-depth plan, three storeys, one bay, and some have basements. The doorways have square-cut monolithic surrounds, and a square window in the ground floor. In the upper floor the windows are mullioned and contain casements.[75] II
100, 101 and 102 Syke Road
53°38′01″N 2°09′08″W / 53.63361°N 2.15210°W / 53.63361; -2.15210 (100, 101 and 102 Syke Road)
c. 1810 Three stone cottages with roofs of slate and stone-slate. They have two storeys, a double-depth plan, No. 100 has three bays, and Nos. 101 and 102 have one bay each. No. 100 has a porch, and the other houses have doorways with monolithic surrounds and a sash window to the left. The other windows are mullioned, those in the upper floors being former workshop windows.[76] II
151 and 152 Syke Road
53°38′09″N 2°09′13″W / 53.63581°N 2.15350°W / 53.63581; -2.15350 (151 and 150 Syke Road)
c. 1810 A pair of stone cottages with quoins, a band, and a slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, and two storeys. No. 151 has two bays and No. 152 has one, and the windows are mullioned.[77] II
153 and 154 Syke Road
53°38′09″N 2°09′13″W / 53.63589°N 2.15352°W / 53.63589; -2.15352 (153 and 154 Syke Road)
c. 1810 A pair of stone cottages with a slate roof, a double-depth plan, and two storeys. Each cottage has two bays, and there is a garage extension to No. 154. The central doorways have monolithic jambs and lintels. The windows were all mullioned, including workshop windows, but some have been altered.[78] II
Dukes Restaurant and Nightclub
53°37′01″N 2°09′23″W / 53.61693°N 2.15629°W / 53.61693; -2.15629 (Dukes Restaurant and Nightclub)
1810 Originally a hotel, the building is in brick on a stone plinth, with stone dressings, cornices between the floors, a modillion eaves cornice, and a slate roof. It has a double-depth plan, three storeys, five bays and a wider bay at the right. In the third bay is a doorway with an Ionic doorcase and a pediment, and in the sixth bay is a wider entrance with four Ionic pilasters and an entablature. The windows are sashes with architraves, and those in the ground floor also have pulvinated friezes.[79] II
Hope Chapel and Parsons House
53°37′18″N 2°09′29″W / 53.62177°N 2.15804°W / 53.62177; -2.15804 (Hope Chapel and Parsons House)
1810 The chapel was extended in 1848. It is in brick, partly rendered, with stone dressings and a slate roof, and has two storeys and three bays on a stone plinth. There are two tiers of arched windows with moulded architraves and keystones. The attached parson's house has three storeys and two bays and a hipped roof.[80][81] II*
32 and 34 Meanwood Brow
53°37′20″N 2°10′30″W / 53.62231°N 2.17496°W / 53.62231; -2.17496 (32 and 34 Meanwood Brow)
c. 1815 A pair of stone cottages with quoins and a stone-slate roof. They have a double-depth plan, three storeys, and one bay each. The top floor is reached by external steps, and in the centre of the front is a doorway with square-cut monolithic jambs. The windows in the ground floor are sashes, and in the top floor are three and four-light mullioned workshop windows.[82] II
Castle Hill House
53°36′44″N 2°09′55″W / 53.61213°N 2.16522°W / 53.61213; -2.16522 (Castle Hill House)
c. 1820 The house is on the site of the former Rochdale Castle. It has a cubic shape, and is in ashlar stone on a plinth, with a sill band, a cornice, a parapet, and a hipped slate roof. The house is in Neoclassical style, with two storeys, and three bays on each front. In the entrance front is a Doric doorway with flanking columns and entablature. The windows are sashes, and in the centre of the entrance front is a pediment containing a plain shield and a scroll.[83][84] II
Ukrainian Catholic Church of Saint Mary
53°37′13″N 2°09′12″W / 53.62040°N 2.15341°W / 53.62040; -2.15341 (Ukrainian Catholic Church of Saint Mary)
St James' Church, Rochdale (3).JPG
1821 Originally the Anglican Church of St James, later a Roman Catholic church, it is stone with a slate roof. The church consists of a nave, a small chancel with a north vestry, and a west tower flanked by porches. The tower has three stages, buttresses rising to crocketed pinnacles, clock faces, and an embattled parapet. Along the sides of the nave are buttresses, an embattled parapet, and windows in Perpendicular style.[85][86] II
Thrum Hall
53°38′03″N 2°10′08″W / 53.63408°N 2.16902°W / 53.63408; -2.16902 (Thrum Hall)
1823 The house is in stone with a hipped stone roof, and is in Italianate style. It has a square plan, two storeys and three bays. On the front is a Doric porch, end pilasters with carved hieroglyphics, a sill band, and projecting stone eaves. The windows are sashes.[87] II
132 Drake Street
53°36′49″N 2°09′17″W / 53.61362°N 2.15465°W / 53.61362; -2.15465 (132 Drake Street)
Early 19th century A house, later offices, in brick with a sill band, a modillion eaves cornice, and a stone-slate roof. It has a double-depth plan, two storeys and three bays. The central doorway has attached Tuscan columns, a fanlight and an open pediment, and the windows are sashes.[88] II
1 and 3 Whitehall Street and
20 East Gate Street
53°37′11″N 2°09′17″W / 53.61983°N 2.15480°W / 53.61983; -2.15480 (1 and 3 Whitehall Street and 20 East Gate Street)
Early 19th century A pair of houses, later offices, on a stone plinth, in brick with stone dressings, a modillion eaves cornice, and a hipped slate roof. They have three storeys, seven bays on Whitehall Street, three on Yorkshire Street, and four on East Gate Street, where there is a two-storey rear extension to No. 1. The doorways have pilasters, fanlights, and cornices, and the windows are sashes with wedge lintels.[89] II
Sundial, Bamford Chapel
53°36′33″N 2°12′50″W / 53.60906°N 2.21382°W / 53.60906; -2.21382 (Sundial, Bamford Chapel)
Early 19th century The sundial is in the graveyard of Bamford Chapel. It is in stone and has a plain shaft with chamfered corners, spreading out at the top to form a base for the dial. The dial and the gnomon are in metal, and the dial is inscribed.[90] II
Prickshaw Cottages
53°38′44″N 2°11′22″W / 53.64549°N 2.18951°W / 53.64549; -2.18951 (Prickshaw Cottages)
Prickshaw hamlet, near Rochdale, Lancashire - geograph.org.uk - 53606.jpg
Early 19th century A row of four cottages with stone-slate roofs. The left cottage has three storeys and a basement, and the other cottages have two storeys. The doorway have plain surrounds, and the windows are mullioned.[91] II
Town Head House
53°37′10″N 2°09′15″W / 53.61943°N 2.15415°W / 53.61943; -2.15415 (Town Head House)
Early 19th century A house, later offices, in brick on a stone plinth, with stone dressings, a band, and a 20th-century roof. There are two storeys with an attic, and a front of three bays. The doorway has attached Doric columns, a fanlight, and an open pediment. In the centre of the upper floor is a window with an architrave and a cornice on consoles. On the left side is a two-storey canted bay window, and on the right side is a five-sided bay window with a pyramidal roof.[92] II
Congregational Church
53°36′50″N 2°09′19″W / 53.61389°N 2.15519°W / 53.61389; -2.15519 (Congregational Church)
Moore Street Congregational Church, Rochdale - geograph.org.uk - 542697.jpg
1829 Originally a Sunday School, the church is in stone with a roof of slate and asphalt. It has a single storey with a basement, and a front of five bays. The doorway has a flat hood, and the windows have square-cut sills and lintels, and monolithic jambs.[93] II
Halfpenny Bridge
53°36′39″N 2°09′02″W / 53.61082°N 2.15067°W / 53.61082; -2.15067 (Halfpenny Bridge)
Halfpenny Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 1396504.jpg
1831 A footbridge, originally a toll bridge, crossing the Rochdale Branch Canal, which is now dry. It consists of a level girder and a slightly segmental-arched girder, with a parapet of cast iron railings with lattice panels. At the west end are three fluted cast iron columns leading to stone steps with rusticated walls. The road bed is paved with York stone.[94] II
St Clement's Church
53°37′17″N 2°10′38″W / 53.62131°N 2.17715°W / 53.62131; -2.17715 (St Clement's Church)
St Clement's Church, Spotland Road - geograph.org.uk - 1730758.jpg
1832–35 The church, designed by Lewis Vulliamy, is in ashlar stone. It consists of a wide nave and a short chancel flanked by small vestries. There is a west door, corner pinnacles, and two lancet windows in each bay. At the east end is a triple lancet with a clock face above, and on the east gable is a bellcote with lancet openings, crocketed gables and a small spire. Inside the church are galleries on three sides.[83][95] II
Spotland Bridge New Mill
53°37′15″N 2°10′31″W / 53.62090°N 2.17518°W / 53.62090; -2.17518 (Spotland Bridge New Mill)
Spotland Bridge Mill - geograph.org.uk - 1730863.jpg
c. 1833 The original part of the former cotton spinning mill is in brick with a slate roof, coped gables, five storeys and an attic, and 13 bays. At the north end is a square stair and toilet tower, and on the corners are pilasters. At the south end is an engine house and a boiler house, and nearby is a tapering octagonal chimney. Later a two-storey office block was built, and after that, by the 1870s, another mill block was added to the east. This is in Accrington brick with a flat roof, four storeys, and sides of nine and eight bays, and with a sprinkler tower. Also on the site is the manager's house, in gritstone with a slate roof and two storeys.[96] II
Flagstone wall east of footpath
53°35′49″N 2°08′36″W / 53.59706°N 2.14331°W / 53.59706; -2.14331 (Flagstone wall east of footpath)
Early to mid 19th century The wall is constructed from large sandstone flags set into the ground and joined by circular metal plates bolted together. The stones are about 1.75 metres (5 ft 9 in) high and of variable width, and the wall is about 160 metres (520 ft) long.[97] II
Flagstone wall south of Broad Lane
53°35′55″N 2°08′37″W / 53.59873°N 2.14354°W / 53.59873; -2.14354 (Flagstone wall south of Broad Lane)
Early to mid 19th century The wall is constructed from large sandstone flags set into the ground and joined by circular metal plates bolted together. The stones are about 1.75 metres (5 ft 9 in) high and of variable width, and the wall is about 85 metres (279 ft) long.[98] II
5 Baillie Street
53°37′04″N 2°09′28″W / 53.61774°N 2.15766°W / 53.61774; -2.15766 (5 Baillie Street)
c. 1840 A shop with a sandstone ground floor, brick above, a slate roof, and three storeys. The ground floor has seven bays, and is highly decorated. In the left bay is a deeply recessed round-headed doorway, with a coffered archway, and a central acanthus and a lion's head. To the right is an arcade of six round-headed windows each with a tympanum containing detailed carving. In the upper floors are sash windows with gauged brick lintels, and there is a band between the floors.[99] II
St Clement's Vicarage
53°37′15″N 2°10′38″W / 53.62093°N 2.17736°W / 53.62093; -2.17736 (St Clement's Vicarage)
1840 The vicarage is in stone with a slate roof. It has a double-depth plan, two storeys, three bays, and an additional range at the rear. The doorway has an elliptical head, side lights and a hood mould, and the windows have chamfered surrounds. There is a bay window in the left return.[100] II
Christ Church, Healey
53°38′16″N 2°10′27″W / 53.63789°N 2.17408°W / 53.63789; -2.17408 (Christ Church)
Christ Church - geograph.org.uk - 1199380.jpg
1849–50 A Commissioners' church by George Shaw, the chancel and chapel were added in 1853, and the spire, north aisle and vestry in 1861. The church is in stone, and has slate roofs with coped gables and cross finials. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a north porch, a chancel with a north vestry and south chapel, all under separate roofs, and a southwest steeple. The steeple has a three stage tower with a south door and a broach spire. Along the sides of the aisles are buttresses with gablets.[101][102] II
Heybrook Mill
53°37′24″N 2°08′37″W / 53.62342°N 2.14358°W / 53.62342; -2.14358 (Heybrook Mill)
Mid 19th century The former woollen mill and associated housing are in gritstone and brick, partly rendered, with slate roofs. The mill has three storeys and seven bays, with loading doors in the sixth bay. The housing is at right angles and consists of four houses with hipped and gabled roofs. Above the doors are fanlights, and the windows vary; some are mullioned, some are sashes, and there are bay windows. On Morley Street is a stone boundary wall with a gateway that has monolithic gate piers with gabled capstones.[103] II
Old Toll House
53°37′21″N 2°11′37″W / 53.62259°N 2.19374°W / 53.62259; -2.19374 (Old Toll House)
19th century The former toll house is in stone with a slate roof and extensions in brick. It has two storeys, two bays, lean-tos to the right and rear, and extensions to the right and rear, all single-storey. The doorway has a monolithic surround, and the windows are casements.[104] II
Pig sties north of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse
53°36′56″N 2°13′44″W / 53.61566°N 2.22877°W / 53.61566; -2.22877 (Pig sties north of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse)
19th century A pair of pig sties in stone with a stone-slate roof and stone ridge tiles. In front are pens enclosed by walls with triangular coping, the gate posts have triangular heads, and the pens are divided by a stone flag wall.[14][105] II
Pig sties southeast of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse
53°36′55″N 2°13′43″W / 53.61537°N 2.22865°W / 53.61537; -2.22865 (Pig sties southeast of Ashworth Fold Farmhouse)
19th century A pair of pig sties in stone with ventilation holes in the gables, moulded eaves gutter brackets, a stone-slate roof, and stone ridge tiles. In front are pens enclosed by walls with triangular coping and partly covered by projecting eaves, the gate posts have triangular heads, and the pens are divided by a stone flag wall.[14][106] II
Christ Church Vicarage
53°38′17″N 2°10′29″W / 53.63798°N 2.17484°W / 53.63798; -2.17484 (Christ Church Vicarage)
Vicarage, Christ Church - geograph.org.uk - 1199406.jpg
1853 The vicarage is in stone on a plinth, with bands, buttresses, and a stone-slate roof. It has two storeys and an L-shaped plan, and a front of three bays. In the second bay is a porch with an arched opening, a hood mould, and a coped gable. Most of the windows are mullioned, some also with transoms, and there is an ornate oriel window in the right gable end.[11][107] II
Rochdale Cemetery Gateway
53°36′48″N 2°11′00″W / 53.61329°N 2.18331°W / 53.61329; -2.18331 (Rochdale Cemetery Gateway)
Cemetery Gates, Rochdale.jpg
1855 The gateway is in stone and consists of a central arch and two smaller flanking arches, all with flattened heads. Between the central and side arches are octagonal buttresss with crocketed pinnacles, and outside the outer arches are angle buttresses, also with crocketed pinnacles. Above each arch is a heraldic shield and a scrolled ribbon, and the gables are coped and stepped. The gates are in cast iron.[5][108] II
St Paul's Church, Norden
53°37′39″N 2°12′48″W / 53.62746°N 2.21332°W / 53.62746; -2.21332 (St Paul's Church)
The Parish Church of St Paul, Norden - geograph.org.uk - 448073.jpg
1859–61 The church, designed by George Shaw in Decorated style, is in stone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave on a plinth with corbelled eaves, a north aisle, a southwest porch, a short south transept acting as a vestry, a chancel, and a west steeple. The steeple has a tower with three stages, a circular stair turret, diagonal buttresses, and a broach spire. On the transept is a bellcote.[109][110] II
Norwich Street Mills
53°36′26″N 2°08′58″W / 53.60727°N 2.14935°W / 53.60727; -2.14935 (Norwich Street Mills)
c. 1860 A cotton spinning and weaving mill, later used for other purposes, it is in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. The main block is in Italianate style, and has three and four storeys, and sides of 22 and seven bays. On the north side is a stair and water tower with a pyramidal roof. On the south side are the engine house, the single-storey boiler house with an L-shaped plan, and a two-storey workshop block, and near to this is an octagonal chimney. To the north is a separate workshop, engine house and warehouse.[111] II
St Martin's Church
53°35′19″N 2°10′33″W / 53.58852°N 2.17570°W / 53.58852; -2.17570 (St Martin's Church)
St Martin's Church, Castleton.jpg
1860–62 The church is in stone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, north and south transepts, a chancel with north and south vestries, and a northwest steeple. The steeple has a tower with three stages, a doorway, angle buttresses, quatrefoil banding, and a broach spire that has canopies with statues and gabled lucarnes.[112][113] II
All Saints Church
53°37′38″N 2°08′49″W / 53.62733°N 2.14702°W / 53.62733; -2.14702 (All Saints Church)
Church of All Saints, Hamer - geograph.org.uk - 1756875.jpg
1863–66 The church, designed by J. Medland Taylor, is in stone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a northwest porch, a double south transept with unequal gables, a chancel, and a southwest steeple. The steeple has a four-stage tower, set back buttresses, one incorporating a staircase, a south porch, and a broach spire. The east window has five lights.[114][115] II
Cemetery Hotel
53°36′48″N 2°10′54″W / 53.61338°N 2.18175°W / 53.61338; -2.18175 (Cemetery Hotel)
The Cemetery Hotel on Bury Road Rochdale.jpg
1860s A public house with a 20th-century decorative scheme, it is in brick with a sill band, a dentilled eaves band, and a hipped slate roof. The public house is on a corner site, with an acutely-angled corner, and has two storeys at the front and three at the rear. There is a central doorway with a fanlight, and the windows have segmental heads, those in the ground floor containing stained glass with Art Nouveau motifs and etched glass, and in the upper floor are casement windows.[116] II
St Mary's Church
53°36′04″N 2°08′47″W / 53.60098°N 2.14632°W / 53.60098; -2.14632 (St Mary's Church)
St Mary's Parish Church, Balderstone - geograph.org.uk - 1730907.jpg
1865–72 The church is in stone with a slate roof that has patterned slates and cross finials, and it is in Decorated style. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, north and south transepts, a chancel, and a northwest steeple. The steeple has a tower has four stages, diagonal buttresses, an octagonal bell turret, the eaves have ballflower decoration, angels and gargoyles, and on the top is a broach spire with lucarnes and canopy pinnacles. In the transepts are rose windows.[117][118] II
St Mary's School
53°36′02″N 2°08′46″W / 53.60059°N 2.14621°W / 53.60059; -2.14621 (St Mary's School)
1866 The school is in stone with a slate roof with a crested ridge. It has a central hall and cross-wings, the right being the larger. The porch has two semicircular-headed openings and a flat roof with a balustrade. In the roof are gabled dormers, and on the ridge is a bellcote.[117][119] II
Pillar box surmounted by gas lamp
53°37′07″N 2°09′33″W / 53.61862°N 2.15925°W / 53.61862; -2.15925 (Pillar box surmounted by gas lamp)
ToadLane2009.jpg
1866 The structure has been relocated to stand outside 31 Toad Lane, and both parts are in cast iron. The pillar box is cylindrical with an inscribed base and has a horizontal slit and a hexagonal cap. On top is a gas lamp that has a gadrooned-vase base, a fluted shaft, a foliated capital, and a hexagonal lantern with a finial.[120] II
United Reformed Church
53°35′27″N 2°11′01″W / 53.59085°N 2.18363°W / 53.59085; -2.18363 (United Reformed Church)
United Reformed Church, Castleton, Rochdale - geograph.org.uk - 133238.jpg
1866 The chapel is in stone and has a slate roof with a coped gable and a finial. There are two storeys, with a meeting hall and vestry in the upper floor, and an undercroft below. There are single-storey extensions, one at the north and the other at the east. The entrance front has three bays, containing four pilasters, the central ones rising to pinnacles. The central doorway has a semicircular head, flanking engaged columns with crocket capitals, a projecting modillion cornice, and a parapet. Above the doorway is a round-headed three-light window, and there are round-headed windows in each floor of the outer bays.[121][122] II
Town Hall
53°36′57″N 2°09′32″W / 53.61580°N 2.15899°W / 53.61580; -2.15899 (Town Hall)
Rochdale Town Hall - geograph.org.uk - 1702105.jpg
1866–71 The town hall was designed by W. H. Crossland, the clock tower was destroyed in 1883, and its replacement is by Alfred Waterhouse. It is in stone with a Westmorland slate roof, and has an E-shaped plan. The town hall has a symmetrical front of 14 bays and a bay on the left linking with a clock tower. The central block has seven bays and two storeys, and contains a central three-bay porte-cochère with a balcony on which stand four gilded heraldic beasts. At the top is an embattled parapet, and in the centre on the roof is a flèche, The central bock is flanked by octagonal stair turrets, and the outer bays have three storeys and triangular stepped gables. The tower has three stages and clock faces flanked by pinnacles, above which is an octagonal lantern with a spire.[123][124] I
St Peter's Church
53°36′41″N 2°08′34″W / 53.61127°N 2.14273°W / 53.61127; -2.14273 (St Peter's Church)
1869 The church, by J. Medland and Henry Taylor, is in polygonal yellow sandstone with red brick dressings and decoration, and roofs in blue and green slate. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, and a semi-octagonal chancel with a north vestry and a south organ chamber. At the west end is a porch, a former baptistry, a stair turret, and a southwest porch intended as the base of a tower. The southwest porch has a pyramidal roof, diagonal buttresses, and an entrance with a pointed arch flanked by roundels containing carvings.[114][125] II
St Edmund's Church
53°37′16″N 2°09′57″W / 53.62101°N 2.16577°W / 53.62101; -2.16577 (St Edmund's Church)
St Edmund's Masonic Church, Rochdale.jpg
1870–73 This is a redundant church designed by J. Medland Taylor in Gothic Revival style, containing much Masonic symbolism. It is in sandstone, on a plinth, it has slate roofs with coped gables and finials, and has a cruciform plan. The church consists of a nave with a west porch and a circular stair turret at the northwest, north and south transepts, the latter with a porch, a chancel with a vestry to the north and a chapel to the south, and a tower at the crossing. The tower has buttresses, an embattled parapet with corner crocketed pinnacles, and there is a higher octagonal stair turret with a small spire at the northeast. Around the diamond-shaped churchyard is a stone wall with stone piers and iron railings, and moulded gateposts.[126][127] I
17a and 19 Baillie Street
53°37′05″N 2°09′23″W / 53.61797°N 2.15644°W / 53.61797; -2.15644 (17a and 19 Baillie Street)
Baillie Street, Rochdale, Lancashire - geograph.org.uk - 721205.jpg
Late 19th century No. 17a originated as a woollen warehouse, and No. 19 as a showroom, and they have since been used for other purposes. Both parts have Welsh slate roofs. No. 17a is in brick with sandstone dressings, and has three storeys and a partial basement, three bays on the front and five on the side. The central doorway has a segmental-arched head, rusticated pilasters, a large keystone, and an entablature with a modillion cornice. Flanking the ground floor are pilasters with semicircular finials. The windows have segmental heads and keystones. In the centre of the left return is a full-height loading bay. The former showroom to the right has two storeys and a basement, and three bays, with a sandstone ground floor and a brick upper floor. In the left bay is a segmental-headed doorway, the central window in the upper floor has a round head, the others have segmental heads, and all have keystones. At the top is a parapet with a central triangular pediment.[128] II
County Court Building
53°36′59″N 2°09′28″W / 53.61629°N 2.15772°W / 53.61629; -2.15772 (County Court Building)
Yates, Rochdale.jpg
Late 19th century The former court building on a corner site, later used for other purposes, is in ashlar stone, and has three storeys. There are five bays facing Packer Street, and three on Fleece Street. In the ground floor are Doric pilasters and a Doric entablature. The windows in the middle floor have dentil cornices and moulded architraves. In the top floor is a guilloché band, and the windows have moulded architraves, entablatures, and Greek key and dentil detailing.[129] II
Statue of C. L. Ashworth
53°36′48″N 2°09′36″W / 53.61342°N 2.16012°W / 53.61342; -2.16012 (Statue of C. L. Ashworth)
1878 The statue in Broadfield Park commemorates Alderman C. L. Ashworth, a local politician. The statue is in stone and stands on a square marble plinth with a cornice and a moulded base, on a stylobate.[83][130] II
Central Library, Museum and Art Gallery
53°36′55″N 2°09′43″W / 53.61515°N 2.16190°W / 53.61515; -2.16190 (Library, Museum and Art Gallery)
Library, Rochdale.jpg
1883 The library was built first, followed by the art gallery and museum linked to the library in 1903, and an extension in 1913. The building was converted into an art and heritage centre in 2003. It is in Yorkshire stone and has a slate roof. The library has one storey, a front of three gables with ball finials, a central porch with an arcaded parapet, an elliptical-headed doorway, and mullioned and transomed windows with elliptical heads and hood moulds. The museum and art gallery have two storeys, a four-bay central block, a three-bay gabled block to the right, and a diagonally-set gabled block to the left. On the gables are panels of carved figures.[83][131] II
10, 12, 14 and 16 Baillie Street
53°37′03″N 2°09′27″W / 53.61763°N 2.15741°W / 53.61763; -2.15741 (10, 12, 14 and 16 Baillie Street)
1890 Originally two shops and a bank to the right, the bank has since been converted into a shop. The building is in brick and stone, with two storeys and an angled front. To the left are two shop fronts, with an entrance between them, and to the right a larger shop front and the former entrance to the bank. This is in stone and contains a doorway with a semicircular head, decorated pilasters and spandrels, and a fanlight. Above is triangular pediment containing a coat of arms on an elliptical pediment with decorated consoles. In the upper floor are windows with segmental or semicircular heads and keystones, and at the top is an eaves cornice.[132] II
Statue of John Bright
53°36′52″N 2°09′44″W / 53.61453°N 2.16226°W / 53.61453; -2.16226 (Statue of John Bright)
John Bright Memorial - geograph.org.uk - 1702403.jpg
1891 The statue in Broadwood Park commemorates John Bright, a local statesman. It is in stone, designed by Hamo Thornycroft, and consists of a figure standing on a tapering square pedestal with a cornice and moulded base, on a stylobate. On the pedestal are inscriptions and quotations.[83][133] II
Silver Street Chapel
53°37′18″N 2°10′13″W / 53.62165°N 2.17033°W / 53.62165; -2.17033 (Silver Street Chapel)
1893 The chapel was designed by Edgar Wood in Arts and Crafts style, and was extended in 1902 and later. It is in red brick with stone dressings, quoins and bands, and has a T-shaped plan. In the gabled entrance front, steps lead up to a round-headed doorway, above which is a panel and seven stepped lancet windows. The gable apex is rendered and decorated with a sculpted Tree of Life. Flanking the doorway are sloping buttresses. Along the south side is a single-storey extension, with a projecting gable at the east end and a two-storey cross-wing at the west.[134][135] II
Barcroft
53°36′07″N 2°11′27″W / 53.60198°N 2.19097°W / 53.60198; -2.19097 (Barcroft)
1894 A house by Edgar Wood, with elements of Vernacular architecture, in rendered brick with stone dressings and a tiled roof. It has two storeys, four bays, and a projecting single-storey rear wing to the left. The first bay contains a flat-headed archway leading to the rear, and above it is a mullioned oriel window. In the second bay are sloping projecting bricks and stepped windows reflecting the staircase, and the third bay contains a projecting gabled wing with an elliptical-headed doorway, a dated lintel, mullioned and transomed windows, and decorative bargeboards. In the right bay is a diagonally-set Tudor-style two-storey bay window.[121][136] II
Foldyard Buildings, Woodhouse Farm
53°37′49″N 2°12′55″W / 53.63034°N 2.21514°W / 53.63034; -2.21514 (Foldyard Buildings, Woodhouse Farm)
1895 A range of buildings with a U-shaped plan in stone with quoins, corbelled eaves, and a stone-slate roof with ridge tiles and ball finials on the corners. On the south side is a gabled porch with a semicircular fanlight, a vent hole, and a corniced pediment. The door openings have rounded jambs and lintels.[137] II
Foldyard Midden, Woodhouse Farm
53°37′50″N 2°12′54″W / 53.63044°N 2.21512°W / 53.63044; -2.21512 (Foldyard Midden, Woodhouse Farm)
1895 A midden shelter with a rectangular plan and sides of one and two bays. It has a hipped stone-slate roof with clay ridge tiles, carried on slender cast iron columns with retaining side walls.[138] II
HSBC Bank
53°37′01″N 2°09′29″W / 53.61703°N 2.15815°W / 53.61703; -2.15815 (HSBC Bank)
HSBC Bank, Rochdale.jpg
1895 Built originally for the Oldham Joint Stock Bank, the bank is in sandstone on a plinth of pink granite with slate roofs, and is in Neoclassical style. It is on a corner site and has a curved front. The central section has three storeys and three bays, and is flanked by two-storey ranges, with three bays on the left and four on the right. Between the floors are frieze bands, and at the top are eaves entablatures and moulded dentilled cornices. The ground floor is rusticated and the windows are round-headed with rusticated voussoirs. The first floor windows are flat-headed with architraves and canopies on console brackets. In the central section is a round-headed doorway with voussoirs and a keystone carved with a shield. Above are four giant engaged Tuscan columns carrying an entablature and a balustraded parapet.[139] II
Spotland Methodist Church
53°37′30″N 2°10′38″W / 53.62509°N 2.17726°W / 53.62509; -2.17726 (Spotland Methodist Church)
Spotland Methodist Free Church - geograph.org.uk - 1734353.jpg
1896 The church is in brick on a stone plinth, with ashlar dressings and a slate roof. The entrance front has five bays and rusticated corner pilasters. The central three bays project slightly under a pediment carried on Corinthian columns. There is a central round-headed doorway flanked by Corinthian columns with a fanlight and an open segmental pediment containing a cartouche. In the outer bays are tall pedimented windows. Along the sides are windows with semicircular heads and keystones, and at the rear is a large vestry block.[109][140] II
Gateway, Falinge Park
53°37′18″N 2°09′48″W / 53.62164°N 2.16338°W / 53.62164; -2.16338 (Gateway, Falinge Park)
c. 1900 At the entrance to the park are two pairs of stone piers flanking the vehicle entrance and two pedestrian entrances, and a pair at the ends of the curving walls. They are in sandstone and have projecting bases, recessed panels, floral festoons, and modillion cornices, and are surmounted by garlanded finials. The gates are in cast iron and have scrollwork and heraldic cartouches.[141] II
Two bridges spanning the
River Spodden
53°37′05″N 2°10′23″W / 53.61799°N 2.17298°W / 53.61799; -2.17298 (North bridge spanning the River Spodden)
53°37′02″N 2°10′18″W / 53.61721°N 2.17155°W / 53.61721; -2.17155 (South bridge spanning the River Spodden)
1904–05 The two bridges carry Mellor Street over a curve in the River Spodden, and each consists of a single shallow skew arch. The abutments, the slab arches, and the buttresses are in reinforced concrete, and the parapets are in sandstone. The parapets are on chamfered plinths, and have rectangular chamfered openings and chamfered coping. At the ends are panelled rectangular piers with chamfered caps.[142] II
The Vicarage
53°37′08″N 2°09′33″W / 53.61900°N 2.15911°W / 53.61900; -2.15911 (The Vicarage)
1906 The vicarage, later used as offices, is in red brick with stone dressings, and has a stone-slate roof with coped gables and ball finials. It is in Jacobean style. with a roughly T-shaped plan, and two storeys with attics and a basement. The windows are mullioned, one also with transoms, and contain horizontally-sliding sash windows. The doorway has a moulded lintel and a moulded flat hood. At the rear is a canted stone bay window.[143] II
Former Union Bank of Manchester
53°37′00″N 2°09′27″W / 53.61666°N 2.15754°W / 53.61666; -2.15754 (Former Union Bank of Manchester)
1906–07 The former bank, later used for other purposes, is in stone with a rusticated granite plinth and a slate roof. It has three storeys with an attic, and a front of three bays. The central bay rises to a tower with a dentilled cornice, an octagonal stone lantern and a lead cupola, which is flanked by four seated female figures. In the ground floor is a round-arched doorway with a moulded hood mould, a giant keystone, and a fanlight. Above are giant pilasters carrying segmental pediments. In the middle floor are casement windows with balconies, and above the central window is a pediment, and a relief carving of allegorical figures.[144] II
Institute for the Deaf
53°36′58″N 2°09′22″W / 53.61598°N 2.15617°W / 53.61598; -2.15617 (Institute for the Deaf)
Institute for the Deaf, Rochdale.jpg
1907 The building is in pale Manchester brick, with dressings in red Huncoat brick and red St Bees sandstone, and a slate roof. It has two storeys, a cellar, an L-shaped plan, and a six bay front. The fourth bay is gabled and contains a doorway that has jambs of red brick quoining, a hood on console brackets, and a fanlight. Under the window above this is a terracotta plaque, and above it is a diamond-shaped terracotta datestone. Most of the windows are sashes, and all have brick apron panels beneath and gauged brick lintels above.[145] II
15 Broadhalgh Avenue
53°36′54″N 2°11′38″W / 53.61509°N 2.19400°W / 53.61509; -2.19400 (15 Broadhalgh Avenue)
1907–09 The house, designed by Parker and Unwin, is roughcast on a plinth, with corner buttresses, ashlar dressings, and steeply-pitched slate roofs containing dormer windows. It consists of three linked blocks, each with one storey and an attic, and with a covered walkway composed of timber posts supporting the eaves. The left block has six bays and mullioned windows, the right bay has two bays with a garage in front of it, and the main block with is recessed, with two square bay windows at the rear, and a nine-light dormer window. At the front of the house is a pergola and double-gates with massive piers and a hipped roof.[146] II
Arrow (Vale) Mill
53°35′42″N 2°10′24″W / 53.59497°N 2.17327°W / 53.59497; -2.17327 (Arrow (Vale) Mill)
Arrow Mill.jpg
1908 A cotton mill by Philip Sidney Stott in brick with slate roofs and an internal structure in steel and concrete. It has a main block of five storeys, sides of 44 and five bays, a water tower at the northeast corner with a hipped roof and a wrought iron balustrade, and smaller corner towers. There are also an engine house, a two storey workshop, a two storey office block, other workshops, a boiler house, and a cylindrical chimney with a moulded crown.[121][147] II
Church of St Mary-in-the-Baum
53°37′08″N 2°09′31″W / 53.61897°N 2.15862°W / 53.61897; -2.15862 (Church of St Mary-in-the-Baum)
St Mary in the Baum, Rochdale 1 (4743411218).jpg
1909–11 The church was rebuilt in 1909–11 by Ninian Comper re-using material from the original church of 1742. It is in brick with sandstone dressings and a tiled roof. and has two storeys. The church consists of a tall nave with a clerestory to the north, two aisles to the a north, the outer aisle having the characteristics of the original church, a north porch, and a chancel. On the west gable of the nave is a bellcote re-used from the previous church.[148][149] I
St Anne's Church
53°37′00″N 2°07′42″W / 53.61655°N 2.12833°W / 53.61655; -2.12833 (St Anne's Church)
St Ann's church, Belfield.jpg
1912–13 The church, by R. B. Preston, is in stone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, a west baptistry, north and south aisles, a chancel with a south vestry and a north organ chamber, and a southwest tower. The tower has diagonal buttresses and a stepped parapet, and the aisle windows have ogee head.[114][150] II
St Aidan's Church
53°36′04″N 2°10′41″W / 53.60124°N 2.17793°W / 53.60124; -2.17793 (St Aidan's Churc)
St Aidan's Church, Rochdale.jpg
1913–15 The church was designed by Temple Moore in Early English style, and the tower was completed in 1931. It is in stone with roofs partly of clay tile and partly of slate. The church consists of a nave and a north aisle under one roof, a south aisle roofed separately, a higher chancel with a clerestory and flanked by chapels, a west porch, and a west tower. The tower has a stair turret, a west door, and an embattled parapet.[151][152] II*
Norden War Memorial
53°37′35″N 2°12′26″W / 53.62650°N 2.20718°W / 53.62650; -2.20718 (Norden War Memorial)
Norden War Memorial, near Rochdale, Lancashire - geograph.org.uk - 59690.jpg
1920 The war memorial is in a triangular memorial garden at a road junction, and is in Yorkstone. It stands on a plinth and an octagonal pedestal, and has an octagonal shaft and a Latin cross. Between the shaft and the cross-arms are projecting crockets, and on the front of the cross is a carved laurel wreath and a sword. The pedestal carries an inscription, and there are panels with the names of those lost in the two World Wars. The garden is enclosed by low iron railings and the area is paved with Yorkstone.[153] II
Post Office
53°37′00″N 2°09′32″W / 53.61657°N 2.15896°W / 53.61657; -2.15896 (Post Office)
Post Office, Rochdale.jpg
1920 The Post Office, designed by C. P. Wilkinson in Baroque style, is in Portland stone with a Westmorland slate roof. It has two storeys with an attic, an L-shaped plan, and a main front of nine bays, the seven middle bays projecting forward. The ground floor is rusticated on a plinth, and contains round-headed openings with scroll keystones. In the upper floor are sash windows with architraves and cornices, and in the roof are pedimented dormers. The building has rusticated quoins, and a moulded cornice with lion's heads.[83][154] II
Rochdale Cenotaph
53°36′59″N 2°09′35″W / 53.61630°N 2.15975°W / 53.61630; -2.15975 (Rochdale Cenotaph)
Rochdale War Memorial (1).JPG
1922 The cenotaph was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. It stands in a garden in front of the Town Hall, and is in Cornish granite. The cenotaph is about 10 metres (33 ft) high and consists of a rectangular pier flanked by half-columns. On top of the pier is a catafalque on which are carved wreathes and a coat of arms, and it is surmounted by the recumbent figure of a soldier. Around the cenotaph are four carved and painted flags, and on it are inscriptions. To the southeast is a Stone of Remembrance.[83][155] I
Lamp posts, War memorial
53°36′58″N 2°09′35″W / 53.61612°N 2.15973°W / 53.61612; -2.15973 (Lamp posts, War memorial)
c. 1922 The lamp posts are at the corners of the war memorial. They are in cast iron on granite plinths. Each lamp post consists of a latticework pylon with crossed torches, and it carries spherical lamp shades.[156] II
St John the Baptist Church
53°36′41″N 2°09′18″W / 53.61132°N 2.15495°W / 53.61132; -2.15495 (St John the Baptist Church)
St John the Baptist Catholic Church, Rochdale (2).JPG
1925–27 A Roman Catholic church in Byzantine Revival style. It is faced in brick with artificial stone dressings, and has a ferro-concrete dome. The church has a cruciform plan, with a central dome, a narthex, transepts, an apsidal sanctuary and a sacristy. The dome is 95 feet (29 m) high and has a diameter of 65 feet (20 m). Around it is a clerestory of 35 round-headed windows, and is surmounted by a cupola with a crucifix finial.[157][158] II*
Buersil and Balderstone War Memorial
53°35′59″N 2°08′45″W / 53.59971°N 2.14595°W / 53.59971; -2.14595 (Buersil and Balderstone War Memorial)
Balderstone War Memorial - geograph.org.uk - 1730931.jpg
1928 The war memorial stands at a road junction, and is in granite. It consists of a Latin cross on a tapering shaft, a tapering rectangular plinth, a rectangular base, and a low step. In the centre of the cross is a carved rose in low relief. There are inscriptions on the base of the shaft and on the plinth, and the names of those lost in the World Wars. Behind the memorial is a curved wall containing a drinking fountain.[159] II
Wall northwest of St Chad's Church
53°36′53″N 2°09′29″W / 53.61477°N 2.15818°W / 53.61477; -2.15818 (Wall northwest of St Chad's Church)
Undated The wall was discovered partly buried in 1903 in the churchyard of St Chad's Church, and has been dated possibly to the Anglo-Saxon era. it consists of 23 posts grooved to accommodate stone flags. The wall is about 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) high and 24 metres (79 ft) long.[32][160] II

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Street View in June 2015 shows that the building has been converted into a private house.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 587–590
  3. ^ Historic England & 1045812
  4. ^ Historic England & 1084269
  5. ^ a b Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 608
  6. ^ Historic England & 1084252
  7. ^ Historic England & 1084284
  8. ^ Historic England & 1084244
  9. ^ Historic England & 1025313
  10. ^ Historic England & 1367077
  11. ^ a b c d e Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 601
  12. ^ Historic England & 1055873
  13. ^ Historic England & 1057667
  14. ^ a b c d e Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 128
  15. ^ Historic England & 1084283
  16. ^ Historic England & 1396460
  17. ^ Historic England & 1084261
  18. ^ Historic England & 1346245
  19. ^ Historic England & 1084223
  20. ^ Historic England & 1346255
  21. ^ Historic England & 1055734
  22. ^ Historic England & 1346246
  23. ^ Historic England & 1084277
  24. ^ Historic England & 1031335
  25. ^ Historic England & 1084262
  26. ^ a b c Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 599
  27. ^ Historic England & 1203380
  28. ^ Historic England & 1084224
  29. ^ Historic England & 1084250
  30. ^ Historic England & 1346250
  31. ^ Historic England & 1084279
  32. ^ a b Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 590
  33. ^ Historic England & 1025899
  34. ^ Historic England & 1366612
  35. ^ Historic England & 1187085
  36. ^ Historic England & 1084228
  37. ^ Historic England & 1346231
  38. ^ Historic England & 1084285
  39. ^ Historic England & 1346232
  40. ^ Historic England & 1031929
  41. ^ Historic England & 1031799
  42. ^ Historic England & 1084226
  43. ^ Historic England & 1055837
  44. ^ Historic England & 1084251
  45. ^ Historic England & 1038323
  46. ^ Historic England & 1084270
  47. ^ a b Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 606
  48. ^ Historic England & 1346243
  49. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 127
  50. ^ Historic England & 1084288
  51. ^ Historic England & 1084266
  52. ^ Historic England & 1346241
  53. ^ Historic England & 1346257
  54. ^ Historic England & 1346236
  55. ^ Historic England & 1038316
  56. ^ Historic England & 1084248
  57. ^ Historic England & 1038295
  58. ^ Historic England & 1346237
  59. ^ Historic England & 1084290
  60. ^ Historic England & 1084265
  61. ^ Historic England & 1346244
  62. ^ Historic England & 1346247
  63. ^ Historic England & 1346248
  64. ^ Historic England & 1346264
  65. ^ Historic England & 1354749
  66. ^ Historic England & 1084253
  67. ^ Historic England & 1084227
  68. ^ Historic England & 1084256
  69. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 598
  70. ^ Historic England & 1045852
  71. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 129
  72. ^ Historic England & 1084292
  73. ^ Historic England & 1084280
  74. ^ Historic England & 1084242
  75. ^ Historic England & 1031788
  76. ^ Historic England & 1346239
  77. ^ Historic England & 1084254
  78. ^ Historic England & 1354753
  79. ^ Historic England & 1367054
  80. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 593
  81. ^ Historic England & 1057694
  82. ^ Historic England & 1346263
  83. ^ a b c d e f g Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 597
  84. ^ Historic England & 1045858
  85. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 591–592
  86. ^ Historic England & 1346258
  87. ^ Historic England & 1084255
  88. ^ Historic England & 1084271
  89. ^ Historic England & 1084259
  90. ^ Historic England & 1084293
  91. ^ Historic England & 1346267
  92. ^ Historic England & 1084282
  93. ^ Historic England & 1346265
  94. ^ Historic England & 1031919
  95. ^ Historic England & 1203251
  96. ^ Historic England & 1268046
  97. ^ Historic England & 1253201
  98. ^ Historic England & 1084240
  99. ^ Historic England & 1242950
  100. ^ Historic England & 1084260
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  102. ^ Historic England & 1055744
  103. ^ Historic England & 1268009
  104. ^ Historic England & 1084272
  105. ^ Historic England & 1084286
  106. ^ Historic England & 1346230
  107. ^ Historic England & 1055756
  108. ^ Historic England & 1084268
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  110. ^ Historic England & 1054802
  111. ^ Historic England & 1268012
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  113. ^ Historic England & 1203230
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  115. ^ Historic England & 1084278
  116. ^ Historic England & 1393976
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  118. ^ Historic England & 1346266
  119. ^ Historic England & 1084245
  120. ^ Historic England & 1253187
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  122. ^ Historic England & 1084281
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  124. ^ Historic England & 1084275
  125. ^ Historic England & 1346238
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  127. ^ Historic England & 1084273
  128. ^ Historic England & 1084263
  129. ^ Historic England & 1038535
  130. ^ Historic England & 1084267
  131. ^ Historic England & 1367096
  132. ^ Historic England & 1346242
  133. ^ Historic England & 1370017
  134. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 607–608
  135. ^ Historic England & 1390684
  136. ^ Historic England & 1084264
  137. ^ Historic England & 1346256
  138. ^ Historic England & 1084225
  139. ^ Historic England & 1416154
  140. ^ Historic England & 1084249
  141. ^ Historic England & 1084276
  142. ^ Historic England & 1412243
  143. ^ Historic England & 1084257
  144. ^ Historic England & 1405181
  145. ^ Historic England & 1416153
  146. ^ Historic England & 1346262
  147. ^ Historic England & 1268015
  148. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 592
  149. ^ Historic England & 1025294
  150. ^ Historic England & 1084243
  151. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 603
  152. ^ Historic England & 1084241
  153. ^ Historic England & 1441459
  154. ^ Historic England & 1346249
  155. ^ Historic England & 1084274
  156. ^ Historic England & 1367099
  157. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 592–593
  158. ^ Historic England & 1376506
  159. ^ Historic England & 1429198
  160. ^ Historic England & 1054859

Sources[edit]