Listed buildings in Tatham, Lancashire

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Tatham is a civil parish in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 47 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, two are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. Apart from the small settlement of Lowgill, the parish is rural, containing widespread farms. Most of the listed buildings are farmhouses, farm buildings and houses. The other listed buildings include two churches, two boundary stones, a derelict colliery engine house, a public house, and a telephone kiosk.

Key[edit]

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Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Church of St James
54°07′09″N 2°36′16″W / 54.11910°N 2.60438°W / 54.11910; -2.60438 (Church of St James)
St James' Church, Tatham.jpeg
17th century The church contains some older remains, the tower was reconstructed in 1722, and the church was restored in 1885–87 by Paley and Austin. It is built in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and consists of a nave, a north aisle, a south porch, a chancel, a northeast vestry and organ chamber, and a west tower. The tower has two setbacks, and a saddleback roof. The windows contain Perpendicular tracery, and the inner doorway is Norman in style.[2][3] II*
Robert Hall Farmhouse and farm building
54°07′02″N 2°33′24″W / 54.11733°N 2.55674°W / 54.11733; -2.55674 (Robert Hall Farmhouse)
16th century Originally house, with a wing added in the 16th or 17th century, and partly turned into a barn in the later 19th century. It is in sandstone with a slate roof, and has two storeys. Most of the windows are mullioned, and there are some sash windows. The barn has a wide entrance with a re-set cartouche containing a coat of arms above, and a stair turret. Inside there are timber-framed partitions.[4][5] II*
Bridge Inn Cottage
54°07′12″N 2°35′40″W / 54.11988°N 2.59452°W / 54.11988; -2.59452 (Bridge Inn Cottage)
Bridge Inn, Tatham.jpg
1642 A stone house with a stone-slate roof in two storeys, with mullioned windows. On the front is a gabled porch with a moulded surround, a triangular head, and an inscribed lintel.[6] II
Foss Bank Farmhouse and farm buildings
54°04′59″N 2°31′13″W / 54.08318°N 2.52024°W / 54.08318; -2.52024 (Foss Bank Farmhouse)
17th century The older part originated as a house, and has been converted into a farm building, the house on the right dating from the 18th century. They are in sandstone with a stone slate roof. The house has two storeys and three bays, with mullioned windows. The farm building contains various openings, some of which have been blocked.[7] II
Old Rectory
54°07′11″N 2°36′19″W / 54.11964°N 2.60515°W / 54.11964; -2.60515 (Old Rectory)
House behind the church, Tatham (geograph 2464030).jpg
17th century (probable) The former rectory was altered in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is in pebbledashed stone with a stone-slate roof, and has two storeys and four bays. The windows are mullioned, and on the front is a 19th-century gabled porch. The doorway has a chamfered surround, and a pointed arch with a Latin inscription.[2][8] II
Thwaite Moss
54°05′34″N 2°31′42″W / 54.09274°N 2.52837°W / 54.09274; -2.52837 (Thwaite Moss)
17th century A house that was extended in the late 18th or early 19th century. It is in stone with a slate roof, and has two storeys. The original part has two bays, and the windows are mullioned. The extension has windows and doors with plain surrounds.[9] II
The Green and farm building
54°06′20″N 2°32′57″W / 54.10553°N 2.54921°W / 54.10553; -2.54921 (The Green)
1672 The house and farm building are in sandstone with a tile roof. The original part of the house has two storeys and two bays, with mullioned windows. The central doorway has a two-storey gabled porch, a moulded surround, and a shaped inscribed lintel. To the right is a later extension, and to the right of this is a barn with a wide entrance and doors. At the rear is a re-set inscribed lintel.[10] II
Green Hall Farmhouse
54°04′53″N 2°30′41″W / 54.08134°N 2.51137°W / 54.08134; -2.51137 (Green Hall Farmhouse)
1673 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. In the centre is a two-storey gabled porch. The doorway has a moulded surround and a shaped lintel inscribed with initials and the date.[11] II
Clintsfield Farmhouse and farm buildings
54°07′22″N 2°34′22″W / 54.12289°N 2.57271°W / 54.12289; -2.57271 (Clintsfield Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The oldest part is a farm building that was originally a house. To the right of this is a farmhouse dating from the mid-18th century, and at the rear is a barn. These are in sandstone with slate roofs. The front of the farmhouse is pebbledashed, it has two storeys and three bays with mullioned windows. Inside the original building is a bressumer. The barn has a wide entrance with a segmental arch and an inscribed keystone.[12] II
Green Farmhouse
54°06′19″N 2°33′02″W / 54.10532°N 2.55047°W / 54.10532; -2.55047 (Green Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The farmhouse is in stone with a stone-slate roof, and has two storeys and three bays. In the central bay is a mullioned window. The entrance is through a gabled porch in a lean-to extension to the left.[13] II
Station House
54°07′26″N 2°35′11″W / 54.12400°N 2.58631°W / 54.12400; -2.58631 (Station House)
Late 17th century A stone house with a slate roof in two storeys. The original windows are mullioned, and later ones are sashes. The doorway has an architrave and a keystone inscribed with the date 1731.[14] II
Swans
54°03′57″N 2°31′30″W / 54.06578°N 2.52495°W / 54.06578; -2.52495 (Swans)
Late 17th century The house was extended to the east by two bays in the mid-18th century. It is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and has two storeys, with mullioned windows. In the older part is a former doorway with a chamfered surround and an inscribed lintel, and a re-set inscribed plaque. Inside is a bressumer.[15] II
House and farm buildings (south), Ringstones
54°05′00″N 2°30′54″W / 54.08325°N 2.51497°W / 54.08325; -2.51497 (House and farm buildings (south), Ringstones)
1676 The house and flanking farm buildings are in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, the farm buildings dating from the 18th century. The house has two storeys and three bays, and some mullions have been retained in the windows. The doorway has a moulded surround and an ogee-shaped inscribed lintel. Both farm buildings have wide entrances with segmental arches.[16] II
Green Side Farmhouse
54°06′28″N 2°33′32″W / 54.10791°N 2.55883°W / 54.10791; -2.55883 (Green Side Farmhouse)
1678 A stone house with a slate roof in two storeys with a rear wing. Some of the windows are mullioned, and the doorway has a moulded surround and a shaped lintel decorated with a leaf and tendril.[17] II
Lythe and barn
54°03′51″N 2°30′47″W / 54.06412°N 2.51310°W / 54.06412; -2.51310 (Lythe)
1679 The house and barn are in sandstone. The house has a tiled roof, and is in two storeys, some of the windows being mullioned. The doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed lintel decorated with a leaf and tendril. The barn to the left has a slate roof, a wide entrance with a segmental arch and keystone, and a pitching hole.[18] II
Russell's Farmhouse and farm buildings
54°06′45″N 2°34′45″W / 54.11256°N 2.57929°W / 54.11256; -2.57929 (Russell's Farmhouse)
1682 The oldest part is the farmhouse, the flanking farm buildings dating probably from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The building is in stone, with roofs mainly of slate, and some tiles. The house has two storeys, and the mullions have been removed from the windows. The doorway has a moulded surround, and a lintel decorated with leaves and tendrils and inscribed with the date and initials.[19] II
Laith House
54°06′19″N 2°33′01″W / 54.10538°N 2.55019°W / 54.10538; -2.55019 (Laith House)
1690 A sandstone house with s stone-slate roof, in two storeys and an original part of three bays. The windows are mullioned, and the doorway has a chamfered surround and a shaped inscribed lintel. To the left is a former barn, now integrated into the house; it has a wide entrance with an inserted door and window.[20] II
Rose Cottage
54°04′41″N 2°31′54″W / 54.07795°N 2.53179°W / 54.07795; -2.53179 (Rose Cottage)
Cottages, Lowgill - geograph.org.uk - 1803395.jpg
1691 A rear wing was later added later. The cottage is in sandstone with a roof of stone-slate at the front and slate and tile at the rear. There are two storeys and an entrance front of two bays. The windows are mullioned.[21] II
Lowgill Hall
54°04′42″N 2°31′53″W / 54.07838°N 2.53152°W / 54.07838; -2.53152 (Lowgill Hall)
1692 A pebbledashed stone house with a stone-slate roof, it has two storeys, two bays, and a rear wing. Some of the mullions in the windows have been retained. The central doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed lintel. There is another inscribed lintel re-set in the rear wing.[22] II
Knott Hill and barn
54°05′07″N 2°31′50″W / 54.08533°N 2.53055°W / 54.08533; -2.53055 (Knott Hill)
1734 The house and barn are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and two bays, and the windows are mullioned. In the centre is a porch with a chamfered doorway and an ogee-shaped lintel. Above the porch is an inscribed oval plaque. The barn to the left has a wide entrance with a segmental arch.[23] II
Station Farmhouse and barn
54°07′26″N 2°35′10″W / 54.12401°N 2.58610°W / 54.12401; -2.58610 (Station Farmhouse)
Early to mid 18th century The house and barn are in sandstone with a slate roof. The house has two storeys and three bays. The windows are mullioned, and the doorway has a moulded surround and an ogee-shaped lintel. The barn protrudes at right angles to the right, and has been partly converted for domestic use.[24] II
Moorhead
54°06′44″N 2°34′54″W / 54.11222°N 2.58174°W / 54.11222; -2.58174 (Moorhead)
1741 A sandstone house with a tiled roof, in two storeys and two bays. The windows are mullioned. In the centre is a porch that has a lintel carved with an oval inscribed plaque. Inside the house is a tunnel vaulted cellar with a well.[25] II
Lane Head Farmhouse and barn
54°06′16″N 2°35′03″W / 54.10431°N 2.58423°W / 54.10431; -2.58423 (Lane Head Farmhouse)
1742 The house and barn are in sandstone. The house has a tiled roof, it is in two storeys with an attic, and has two bays. The windows are mullioned, and above the door is an inscribed plaque. The barn to the left has a slate roof, and a wide entrance with a segmental arch.[26] II
House and barn (east), Ringstones
54°05′00″N 2°30′53″W / 54.08345°N 2.51462°W / 54.08345; -2.51462 (House and barn (east), Ringstones)
1742 The house and barn are in sandstone. The house has a stone-slate roof, and is in two storeys and two bays, with mullioned windows. In the centre is a single-storey gabled porch, above which is an inscribed plaque. The barn to the left has a slate roof, and a wide entrance with a segmental arch.[27] II
Tatham Bridge Inn
54°07′12″N 2°35′40″W / 54.11996°N 2.59451°W / 54.11996; -2.59451 (Tatham Bridge Inn)
Bridge Inn, Tatham (2).jpg
1744 A rendered public house with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. The windows are mullioned, and the central doorway has a flagstone forming a hood. Above the doorway is an inscribed plaque. To the left is an additional bay joining the public house to a cottage.[28] II
Botton Head Farmhouse
54°03′08″N 2°31′09″W / 54.05228°N 2.51923°W / 54.05228; -2.51923 (Botton Head Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century The farmhouse is in sandstone, and has a roof of slate at the front and stone-slate at the rear. It is in two storeys and two bays, and has mullioned windows. In the centre is a single-storey gabled porch, above which is an inscribed plaque.[29] II
Far Mealbank Farmhouse and barn
54°06′19″N 2°35′49″W / 54.10515°N 2.59690°W / 54.10515; -2.59690 (Far Mealbank Farmhouse)
Mid 18th century The house and barn are in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. The house has two storeys and two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are mullioned. The barn to the left has external steps leading to a first floor doorway; most of the barn projects forward and it contains a wide entrance with a segmental arch.[30] II
Farr House
54°04′43″N 2°31′54″W / 54.07861°N 2.53177°W / 54.07861; -2.53177 (Farr House)
Mid 18th century A sandstone house with a roof of slate at the front and stone-slate at the rear. There are two storeys and four bays. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are mullioned.[31] II
Ridleys
54°07′12″N 2°35′32″W / 54.12003°N 2.59209°W / 54.12003; -2.59209 (Ridleys)
Mid 18th century (probable) A house, containing some 17th-century material, in rendered sandstone with a tile roof. It has two storeys and a main part of three bays. The central doorway has a moulded surround and an inscribed battlemented lintel. There is a one-bay extension to the right, and to the left is a former barn with a wide entrance and a segmental arch that has been incorporated into the house.[32] II
Snap Cottage and Well House
54°04′41″N 2°31′53″W / 54.07797°N 2.53134°W / 54.07797; -2.53134 (Snap Cottage and Well House)
Mid 18th century Two sandstone cottages in two storeys with mullioned windows. Each cottage has one bay. Well House has a stone-slate roof and a door with a flagstone hood, and Snap Cottage has a tile roof and a gabled stone porch.[33] II
Ivah Farmhouse
54°04′25″N 2°31′46″W / 54.07351°N 2.52946°W / 54.07351; -2.52946 (Ivah Farmhouse)
1755 A pebbledashed stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. The windows have central mullions and modern frames, and above the central doorway is an inscribed oval plaque.[34] II
The Hill Farmhouse
54°06′10″N 2°32′45″W / 54.10279°N 2.54582°W / 54.10279; -2.54582 (The Hill Farmhouse)
Late 18th century The farmhouse is in sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys with cellars, and a symmetrical three-bay front. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes. Seven steps lead up to the doorway, which has a moulded hood on consoles. At the rear is a tall stair window with two transoms.[35] II
Lowgill House and farm store
54°04′41″N 2°31′55″W / 54.07794°N 2.53207°W / 54.07794; -2.53207 (Lowgill House)
1777 The house and store are in sandstone. The house has a tiled roof, and is in two storeys and three bays, with modern windows. In the centre is a modern glazed porch, and above the doorway is an inscribed plaque. The store to the left has a roof of slate and stone-slate, and has two storeys and two bays.[a][36] II
Lanshaw Farmhouse
54°04′53″N 2°30′18″W / 54.08147°N 2.50513°W / 54.08147; -2.50513 (Lanshaw Farmhouse)
1786 A rendered house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, the windows being mullioned. Above the doorway is an inscribed oval plaque.[37] II
Blands Farmhouse
54°07′18″N 2°34′30″W / 54.12162°N 2.57498°W / 54.12162; -2.57498 (Blands Farmhouse)
1789 A house in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys with a cellar and two bays. The windows in the upper floor are sashes, and below they are modern. The central doorway has a plain surround, above which is an oval inscribed plaque.[38] II
Hole House Farmhouse
54°05′18″N 2°32′33″W / 54.08826°N 2.54241°W / 54.08826; -2.54241 (Hole House Farmhouse)
Hole House Farm, Tatham.jpg
1794 A sandstone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are mullioned. Above the central doorway is an inscribed oval plaque.[39] II
Goose house,
Blands Farm
54°07′17″N 2°34′31″W / 54.12150°N 2.57526°W / 54.12150; -2.57526 (Goose house, Blands Farm)
Early 19th century The goose house is surmounted by a pigeon loft, and is in sandstone. It has a square base on which is a conical corbelled hut. There is a faceted dome on the top.[40] II
Wall, Blands Farm
54°07′17″N 2°34′30″W / 54.12136°N 2.57513°W / 54.12136; -2.57513 (Wall, Blands Farm)
Early 19th century The retaining wall of the garden is in sandstone, and is roughly circular in plan. It contains seven bee boles, and there are steps leading to the upper garden. There is also a doorway leading to tunnels connecting with underground passages.[41] II
Boundary stone
54°05′26″N 2°30′15″W / 54.09058°N 2.50406°W / 54.09058; -2.50406 (Boundary stone)
Early 19th century (probable) The stone marks the boundary with the parish of Bentham, North Yorkshire. It consists of an upright sandstone flag inscribed with the names of the parishes on the front, divided by a vertical line.[42] II
Boundary stone
54°06′19″N 2°32′16″W / 54.10514°N 2.53765°W / 54.10514; -2.53765 (Boundary stone)
Early 19th century (probable) The stone marks the boundary with the parish of Bentham, North Yorkshire. It consists of an upright sandstone flag inscribed with the names of the parishes on the front, divided by a vertical line.[43] II
Clintsfield Colliery Engine House
54°07′25″N 2°34′04″W / 54.12365°N 2.56769°W / 54.12365; -2.56769 (Clintsfield Colliery Engine House)
Clintsfield Colliery Engine House.jpg
Early 19th century The former engine pumping house was converted into a house, but later became derelict. It is in sandstone, and consists of a main block about 25 feet (7.6 m) high and a lower shed to the north with a chimney about 20 feet (6.1 m) high. The engine house is part of a scheduled monument,[44][45][46] II
Crown House
54°04′40″N 2°31′54″W / 54.07787°N 2.53180°W / 54.07787; -2.53180 (Crown House)
Early 19th century Originally a public house, later converted for domestic use, it is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. There are three storeys and two bays. The central doorway and the windows have plain surrounds, and the windows are modern.[47] II
Higher Stock Bridge Farmhouse
54°05′23″N 2°31′56″W / 54.08985°N 2.53209°W / 54.08985; -2.53209 (Higher Stock Bridge Farmhouse)
Early 19th century A rendered stone house with a slate roof, it has two storeys and two bays. The windows are sashes, and on the front is a single-storey gabled porch. The inner doorway has a re-set 17th-century moulded surround with a shaped lintel.[48] II
Ivy Cottage and East View
54°04′40″N 2°31′55″W / 54.07770°N 2.53197°W / 54.07770; -2.53197 (Ivy Cottage and East View)
Early to mid 19th century A pair of houses in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, in two storeys. East View, on the right, has three bays, and above the doorway is a moulded cornice hood; Ivy Cottage has two bays. The windows in both houses are sashes.[49] II
Wenning Cottage
54°07′27″N 2°35′25″W / 54.12403°N 2.59036°W / 54.12403; -2.59036 (Wenning Cottage)
Mid 19thcentury (probable) The house is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof. The main part has four bays, with a taller extension to the left. The extension has a two-storey canted bay window. In the first bay of the main part is a single-storey porch with a parapet and a Tudor arched doorway, and in the third bay is a single-storey canted bay window. Most of the windows are sashes, and some are mullioned.[50] II
Church of the Good Shepherd
54°04′59″N 2°31′49″W / 54.08310°N 2.53033°W / 54.08310; -2.53033 (Church of the Good Shepherd)
Church of the Good Shepherd - geograph.org.uk - 120370.jpg
1888 The church, by Paley, Austin and Paley replaced an earlier church on the site. It is in sandstone with a stone-slate roof, and consists of a nave and a chancel, a central tower, a north vestry, and a south porch. The tower has a pyramidal roof and a coped parapet. The east and west windows contain Perpendicular tracery.[44][51] II
Telephone kiosk
54°04′40″N 2°31′54″W / 54.07765°N 2.53171°W / 54.07765; -2.53171 (Telephone kiosk)
1935 A K6 type telephone kiosk, designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. Constructed in cast iron with a square plan and a dome, it has three unperforated crowns in the top panels.[52] II

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ Street View in April 2009 shows that the farm store has been converted for domestic use.

Citations

  1. ^ Historic England
  2. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 664
  3. ^ Historic England & 1317663
  4. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 664–665
  5. ^ Historic England & 1071577
  6. ^ Historic England & 1164901
  7. ^ Historic England & 1317640
  8. ^ Historic England & 1071576
  9. ^ Historic England & 1071580
  10. ^ Historic England & 1362588
  11. ^ Historic England & 1071570
  12. ^ Historic England & 1071612
  13. ^ Historic England & 1317621
  14. ^ Historic England & 1071579
  15. ^ Historic England & 1164867
  16. ^ Historic England & 1165021
  17. ^ Historic England & 1362607
  18. ^ Historic England & 1362610
  19. ^ Historic England & 1164846
  20. ^ Historic England & 1362609
  21. ^ Historic England & 1071583
  22. ^ Historic England & 1164953
  23. ^ Historic England & 1071573
  24. ^ Historic England & 1071578
  25. ^ Historic England & 1071575
  26. ^ Historic England & 1071574
  27. ^ Historic England & 1071585
  28. ^ Historic England & 1071581
  29. ^ Historic England & 1071587
  30. ^ Historic England & 1362611
  31. ^ Historic England & 1071582
  32. ^ Historic England & 1317608
  33. ^ Historic England & 1362573
  34. ^ Historic England & 1362608
  35. ^ Historic England & 1071571
  36. ^ Historic England & 1317500
  37. ^ Historic England & 1263069
  38. ^ Historic England & 1164639
  39. ^ Historic England & 1071572
  40. ^ Historic England & 1071610
  41. ^ Historic England & 1164661
  42. ^ Historic England & 1165032
  43. ^ Historic England & 1362574
  44. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 665
  45. ^ Historic England & 1071611
  46. ^ Historic England & 1018920
  47. ^ Historic England & 1164991
  48. ^ Historic England & 1317546
  49. ^ Historic England & 1071584
  50. ^ Historic England & 1317560
  51. ^ Historic England & 1362587
  52. ^ Historic England & 1393359

Sources