Listed buildings in Yealand Conyers

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Yealand Conyers is a civil parish in Lancaster, Lancashire, England. It contains 28 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, two are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The parish contains the village of Yealand Conyers, and is otherwise rural. Most of the listed buildings are houses within the village. The other listed buildings include a country house, two churches, and a Quaker Meeting House. The Lancaster Canal passes through the edge of he parish, and a bridge crossing it is listed.

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
Old Hall Farmhouse
54°10′03″N 2°45′40″W / 54.16739°N 2.76103°W / 54.16739; -2.76103 (Old Hall Farmhouse)
Old Hall Farmhouse, Yealand Conyers.jpg
1667 A limestone house with a slate roof in two storeys with attics. The original windows are mullioned, and there is one sash window. On the front is a central porch, and at the rear is a later wing.[2][3] II
Old Post House
54°09′53″N 2°45′41″W / 54.16474°N 2.76133°W / 54.16474; -2.76133 (Old Post House)
Late 17th century A limestone house with a slate roof, once divided into two dwellings, and later back into one. It has two storeys and an attic. The original part has mullioned windows and two central doorways. To the right is an extension with an outshut containing casement windows, and further to the right is another extension.[4] II
Quaker Meeting House
54°09′48″N 2°45′42″W / 54.16344°N 2.76153°W / 54.16344; -2.76153 (Quaker Meeting House)
Friends' Meeting House, Yealands Conyers.jpg
1692 The meeting house is in roughcast stone with a slate roof, and has one storey. On the front is a gabled porch and sash windows. The doorway has a chamfered surround and a dated segmental head. Inside the building is a gallery.[5][6] II*
Green Garth
54°09′44″N 2°45′44″W / 54.16223°N 2.76219°W / 54.16223; -2.76219 (Green Garth)
Mid 18th century (probable) The house contains some 17th-century material. It is in limestone with sandstone dressings and a slate roof, and has three storeys and four bays. The windows are mullioned, and on the front is a bay window. The doorway has a chamfered surround.[7] II
Leighton Hall
54°09′47″N 2°46′33″W / 54.16300°N 2.77580°W / 54.16300; -2.77580 (Leighton Hall)
Leighton Hall.jpg
1759–60 The country house was designed by John Hird in Georgian style, and its front was Gothicized in 1822–25. Extensions were added in 1870 by Paley and Austin. The house is in limestone with sandstone dressings and a slate roof. The main block has two storeys and three bays, it has a battlemented parapet, octagonal corner turrets, and a single-story battlemented porch. To the right is a single-storey link to a pavilion and a conservatory. To the left is a two-storey link to a battlemented tower with a four-storey turret. To the rear of the tower is a three-storey wing.[8][9] II*
The Bower
54°09′39″N 2°45′45″W / 54.16082°N 2.76239°W / 54.16082; -2.76239 (The Bower)
Late 18th century The house is in stone with a slate roof, it has two storeys and sash windows. The original part has three bays, and there is a single-bay extension to the south. The doorway has a plain surround, and there is an iron porch. There are further extensions to the rear.[10] II
Dykes Farmhouse
54°09′56″N 2°45′20″W / 54.16544°N 2.75567°W / 54.16544; -2.75567 (Dykes Farmhouse)
Late 18th century A pebbledashed stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, and the windows are sashes.[11] II
Laurel Bank
54°09′45″N 2°45′44″W / 54.16254°N 2.76230°W / 54.16254; -2.76230 (Laurel Bank)
Late 18th century The house is in stone with sandstone dressings, a slate roof, and a rendered left gable end. There are two storeys with an attic, and a symmetrical three-bay front. The windows are sashes, and the central gabled porch has decorated bargeboards. On the left side is a canted bay window and a conservatory.[12] II
Kilross Lodge
54°10′03″N 2°45′37″W / 54.16751°N 2.76022°W / 54.16751; -2.76022 (Kilross Lodge)
c. 1800 This originated as a limestone barn with a slate roof. In the south front are various openings, one of which is wide with a segmental arch. On the right gable end is a lean-to extension, and on top of the gables are ball finials. Set into the south wall is a sandstone milestone with a rounded top.[a][13] II
Yealand Manor
54°09′54″N 2°45′53″W / 54.16492°N 2.76484°W / 54.16492; -2.76484 (Yealand Manor)
1805 A country house in limestone with a hipped slate roof, in two storeys with attics. The east front has three bays and contains a portico with two pairs of baseless unfluted Doric columns and an entablature. The north and south fronts have five bays. All the windows are sashes, some with mullions, and there is a gabled attic dormer.[2][14] II
Beechfield
54°09′43″N 2°45′39″W / 54.16185°N 2.76083°W / 54.16185; -2.76083 (Beechfield)
c. 1810 The house is in limestone with a hipped slate roof, and has two storeys with an attic and three bays. The windows are sashes, and there is a gabled attic dormer. On the front is a portico with pilasters and Tuscan columns, a frieze, and a cornice. To the left is a two-bay 19th-century extension.[2][15] II
Saltermire Bridge
(No 141)
54°10′08″N 2°44′13″W / 54.16899°N 2.73690°W / 54.16899; -2.73690 (Saltermire Bridge)
Saltermire Bridge.jpg
1819 The bridge carries Cinderbarrow Lane over the Lancaster Canal. It is in limestone, and consists of a single semi-elliptical arch with a projecting keystone. It has a solid parapet with flat-topped coping.[16] II
5, 7 and 9 Yealand Road
54°09′39″N 2°45′41″W / 54.16095°N 2.76140°W / 54.16095; -2.76140 (5, 7 and 9 Yealand Road)
Early 19th century A row of three limestone cottages with a slate roof in two storeys. Most of the windows are sashes, and the doorways have plain surrounds.[17] II
6 Yealand Road
54°09′41″N 2°45′41″W / 54.16149°N 2.76143°W / 54.16149; -2.76143 (6 Yealand Road)
Early 19th century The house is in limestone with sandstone dressings and a slate roof in two storeys.. It consists of a main block with three bays and a cross-wing to the right. The windows are sashes, and the doorway has a plain surround and a cornice hood on brackets.[18] II
Holmere Bank
54°09′56″N 2°45′15″W / 54.16567°N 2.75409°W / 54.16567; -2.75409 (Holmere Bank)
Early 19th century A limestone house with a slate roof in two storeys with an attic. It has a three-bay front with a single-bay extension to the left. The house has chamfered quoins, a parapet, and sash windows. The doorway has a plain surround and a moulded cornice hood. In the extension is a canted bay window.[19] II
New Inn
54°10′01″N 2°45′39″W / 54.16692°N 2.76093°W / 54.16692; -2.76093 (New Inn)
New Inn, Yealand Conyers - geograph.org.uk - 470417.jpg
Early 19th century The public house incorporates material from the 17th century. It is in pebbledashed stone with a slate roof, and has two storeys with an attic and three bays. Most of the windows are sashes, and the central doorway has a cornice hood. In the rear wall is a mullioned window, and there is a rear wing with external steps leading to a first floor doorway.[2][20] II
Peterhill House
54°09′46″N 2°45′44″W / 54.16265°N 2.76229°W / 54.16265; -2.76229 (Peterhill House)
Early 19th century The house is pebbledashed with a slate roof, and has two storeys with attics, and three bays. In the ground floor are a French window, a doorway with a plain surround and a fanlight containing intersecting tracery, and a canted bay window. Most of the windows are sashes. To the right is a lower two-storey wing, and at the rear is a lean-to extension and a gabled wing.[21] II
Stable block,
Yealand Manor
54°09′53″N 2°45′56″W / 54.16479°N 2.76555°W / 54.16479; -2.76555 (Stable block, Yealand Manor)
Early 19th century The former stables are in limestone with sandstone dressings and a hipped slate roof. There are two storeys. In the east wall are two wide entrances with segmental arches, one of which is blocked, doors, and windows. In the west wall are pitching holes.[22] II
53 Yealand Road
54°10′01″N 2°45′40″W / 54.16695°N 2.76123°W / 54.16695; -2.76123 (53 Yealand Road)
Early to mid 19th century A stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys with an attic and with two bays. The openings have plain surrounds, the windows being sashes. On the front is a wooden porch with fretwork and a finial.[23] II
The Elms and stable block
54°09′39″N 2°45′39″W / 54.16090°N 2.76091°W / 54.16090; -2.76091 (The Elms)
Early to mid 19th century The house and stable block are in limestone with slate roofs, and they contain sash windows. The house has two storeys and a west front of three bays. The entrance is in a north two-bay extension, and there is also a lean-to extension to the east. A wall links the house to a stable and coach house that contain a blocked wide entrance with a segmental arch and a pitching hole.[24] II
Yealand House
54°09′40″N 2°45′47″W / 54.16104°N 2.76317°W / 54.16104; -2.76317 (Yealand House)
Early to mid 19th century A pebbledashed house with a limestone porch, a slate roof, and sash windows. It has ​2 !2 storeys, and main front of six bays, the outer two bays on each side projecting under gables. In the central two bays is a porch that has octagonal piers with capitals and bases. The east wall has four bays, and there are extensions at the rear.[2][25] II
St John's Church
54°10′01″N 2°45′24″W / 54.16682°N 2.75654°W / 54.16682; -2.75654 (St John's Church)
St John's Church, Yealand Conyers.jpg
1836 The north aisle was added in 1861, and the chancel in 1882. The church is in limestone, with sandstone dressings in the chancel, and it has a slate roof. It consists of a nave, a north aisle, a chancel, and a west tower with a projecting battlemented parapet. Most of the windows are lancets.[5][26] II
10 Yealand Road
54°09′43″N 2°45′43″W / 54.16201°N 2.76184°W / 54.16201; -2.76184 (10 Yealand Road)
Mid 19th century A pebbledashed stone house with a slate roof, in two storeys and three bays. In the centre is a gabled porch with a modern door. The windows are modern in plain limestone surrounds.[27] II
Langdale
54°10′04″N 2°45′24″W / 54.16767°N 2.75656°W / 54.16767; -2.75656 (Langdale)
1851 Originally a vicarage, the house is in limestone with a hipped slate roof and sash windows. The east front has four bays, the central two bays projecting forward under a gable. The north front has three bays, and contains a single-storey porch and a doorway with a chamfered surround and a cornice hood. On the west side a s low gabled wing.[28] II
St Mary's Church
54°09′38″N 2°45′41″W / 54.16054°N 2.76139°W / 54.16054; -2.76139 (St Mary's Church)
St Mary's Church, Yealand Conyers.jpg
1852 A Roman Catholic church by E. G. Paley in limestone with a slate roof. It consists of a nave, a lower chancel , and a north porch. At the west end is a double gabled bellcote. The windows are lancets with plate tracery.[5][29] II
Wall and railings,
4 Yealand Road
54°09′39″N 2°45′40″W / 54.16089°N 2.76110°W / 54.16089; -2.76110 (Wall and railings, 4 Yealand Road)
Uncertain The low concave wall is in limestone, and it has iron railings with urn finials. There is a pair of square limestone gate piers with pointed caps.[30] II
Old Hall Cottage
54°10′02″N 2°45′40″W / 54.16725°N 2.76119°W / 54.16725; -2.76119 (Old Hall Cottage)
Uncertain Originally a barn, later converted into a house with a garage, it is in stone with a slate roof and has modern windows. In the south wall is a gabled porch, and in the east wall is a wide entrance with a pointed arched head. There are ball finials on the gables.[31] II
Mounting block,
Quaker Meeting House
54°09′48″N 2°45′42″W / 54.16346°N 2.76173°W / 54.16346; -2.76173 (Mounting block, Quaker Meeting House)
Uncertain The mounting block is in limestone, and consists of a central platform flanked by three steps.[32] II

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ Street View dated June 2009 shows that the barn has been converted for residential use.

Citations

Sources