Lithium molybdate

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Lithium molybdate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.033.601
Properties
Li2MoO4
Molar mass 173.82 g/mol
Appearance white odorless powder
hygroscopic or transparent crystal
Density 3.07 g/cm3 (pure crystal), 2.66 g/cm3 (hydrated crystal)
Melting point 705 °C (1,301 °F; 978 K)
very soluble
Hazards
not listed
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g., chlorine gas Reactivity code 1: Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures. E.g., calcium Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Related compounds
Other cations
sodium molybdate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Lithium molybdate (Li2MoO4) is a chemical compound. It is mainly used as an inhibitor in some types of industrial air conditioning.

Uses[edit]

Lithium molybdate is used as corrosion inhibitor in LiBr (Lithium bromide) absorption chiller for industrial central air conditioning. It is manufactured and shipped as either a colorless, transparent fluid or a white crystal powder. In either state it not classified as a hazardous material.

Li2MoO4 crystals have been found applicable for cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors, which are used to investigate some rare nuclear processes.[1] The use of Li2MoO4 ceramics for antennas has been studied due to their low loss dielectric properties and the possibility to fabricate them by a room-temperature densification method instead of conventional sintering.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barinova, O. P.; Danevich, F. A.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Kirsanova, S. V.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Pirro, S.; Tretyak, V. I. (2010-01-21). "First test of Li2MoO4 crystal as a cryogenic scintillating bolometer". Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 613 (1): 54–57. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2009.11.059. 
  2. ^ Kähäri, Hanna; Ramachandran, Prasadh; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli. "Room-Temperature Densified Li2MoO4 Ceramic Patch Antenna and the Effect of Humidity". International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology: n/a–n/a. doi:10.1111/ijac.12615. ISSN 1744-7402.