Little grass frog

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Little grass frog
P ocularis USGS.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Hylidae
Genus: Pseudacris
Species:
P. ocularis
Binomial name
Pseudacris ocularis
Bosc & Daudin, 1801
Synonyms
  • Hyla ocularis Bosc & Daudin
    in Sonnini & Latreille, 1801
  • Hyla oculata Daudin, 1802
  • Calamita ocularis
    Merrem, 1820
  • Auletris ocularis Wagler, 1830
  • Hylodes ocularis
    Holbrook, 1838
  • Chorophilus angulatus
    Cope, 1875
  • Cystignathus ocularis
    — Cope, 1875
  • Chorophilus ocularis
    — Cope, 1875
  • Pseudacris ocularis
    Stejneger & Barbour, 1917
  • Hyla ocularis Noble, 1923
  • Acris ocularis Mittleman, 1946
  • Limnaoedus ocularis
    — Mittleman & List, 1953
  • Pseudacris ocularis
    Hedges, 1986

The little grass frog (Pseudacris ocularis) is a species of chorus frog endemic to the Southeastern United States.

Florida

Description[edit]

P. ocularis is the smallest frog in North America, only reaching a maximum head-body length of 19 mm (0.75 in). It is normally pale brown, but can have a green or pink tinge.

Habitat[edit]

This species is mostly found around marshy swamps.

References[edit]

  • Hammerson, Geoffrey A. (2004). "Pseudacris ocularis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2006. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 12 May 2006. Database entry includes a range map and justification for why this species is of least concern
  • "Species Profile: Little Grass Frog". Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Retrieved 2011-08-08.

Further reading[edit]

  • Behler JL, King FW. 1979. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Reptiles and Amphibians. New York: Knopf. 743 pp. ISBN 0-394-50824-6. (Limnaoedus ocularis, p. 410 + Plate 172).
  • Boulenger GA. 1882. Catalogue of the Batrachia Salientia s. Ecaudata in the Collection of the British Museum. Second Edition. London: Trustees of the British Museum. (Taylor and Francis, printers). xvi + 503 pp. + Plates I-XXX. (Chorophilus ocularis, pp. 333–334).
  • Collins, Henry Hill Jr. 1959. Complete Field Guide to American Wildlife: East, Central and North. New York, Evanston, and London: Harper & Row. xix + 683 pp. + Plates 1-48. (Hyla ocularis, p. 443 + Figure 114 and map on p. 444).
  • Conant R. 1975. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Second Edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. xviii + 429 pp. + Plates 1-48. ISBN 0-395-19979-4 (hardcover), ISBN 0-395-19977-8 (paperback). (Limnaoedus ocularis, pp. 326–327 + Plate 47 + Map 283).
  • Holbrook JE. 1842. North American Herpetology; or, A Description of the Reptiles Inhabiting The United States. Vol. IV. Philadelphia: J. Dobson. 138 pp. + Plates I-XXXV. (Hylodes ocularis, pp. 137–138 + Plate XXXV).
  • Wright AH, Wright AA. 1949. Handbook of Frogs and Toads of the United States and Canada. Third Edition. Ithaca, New York: Comstock. xxii + 640 pp. (Pseudacris ocularis, pp. 264–267, Plate LVI, map 18).