Liza (All the Clouds'll Roll Away)

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"Liza (All the Clouds'll Roll Away)" is a song composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Gus Kahn. It was introduced in 1929 by Ruby Keeler (as Dixie Dugan) in Florenz Ziegfeld's musical Show Girl.[1] The stage performances were accompanied by the Duke Ellington Orchestra.[2] On the show's opening night in Boston on June 25, 1929, Keeler's husband and popular singer Al Jolson suddenly stood up from his seat in the third row and sang a chorus of the song, much to the surprise of the audience and Gershwin himself.[3] Jolson recorded the song a few days later on July 6, 1929, and his rendition rose to number nine on the charts of the day.[4]

Other notable recordings[edit]

A popular jazz standard, the song has been recorded by:

Film appearances[edit]

In popular culture[edit]

Liza Minnelli performed the number at her 2008-9 concert Liza's at The Palace...!. It is also included in the 2015 Broadway musical An American in Paris, a joke on the mispronunciation of "Lise" - the female lead's name - by the American Jerry Mulligan.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Jazz Standards Songs and Instrumentals (Liza (All the Clouds'll Roll Away))". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 2009-09-06. 
  2. ^ Jasen, David A. (2002). A Century of American Popular Music: 2000 Best-Loved and Remembered Songs (1899–1999). Taylor & Francis. p. 121. ISBN 0-415-93700-0. 
  3. ^ Goldman, Herbert G. (1988). Jolson : The Legend Comes To Life. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 191–192. ISBN 0-19-506329-5. 
  4. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 235. ISBN 0-89820-083-0. 
  5. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 2, 2017. 
  6. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 2, 2017. 
  7. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  8. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  9. ^ "45worlds.com". 45worlds.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  10. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 2, 2017. 
  11. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  12. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  13. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 2, 2017. 
  14. ^ "The Online Discographical Project". 78discography.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Django Reinhardt Discography". djangopedia.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 
  16. ^ Goldman, Herbert G. (1988). Jolson : The Legend Comes To Life. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 390. ISBN 0-19-506329-5. 
  17. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved September 30, 2017. 
  18. ^ "allmusic.com". allmusic.com. Retrieved October 1, 2017. 

See also[edit]