Llanddwyn Island Lighthouse

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Tŵr Mawr Lighthouse
LlanddwynLB14.JPG
Tŵr Mawr lighthouse
Llanddwyn Island Lighthouse is located in Wales
Llanddwyn Island Lighthouse
Wales
LocationYnys Llanddwyn
Anglesey
Wales
United Kingdom
Coordinates53°08′07″N 4°24′56″W / 53.135165°N 4.415574°W / 53.135165; -4.415574
Year first constructed1845
Automated1975 Edit this on Wikidata
Deactivated1975
Constructionstone tower
Tower shapemassive conical tower and roof
Markings / patternwhite tower
Tower height11 metres (36 ft)
Focal height25 metres (82 ft)
Range7 nautical miles (13 km; 8.1 mi)
CharacteristicFl WR 2.5s Edit this on Wikidata
Admiralty numberA5210.1
ARLHS numberWAL-057
Managing agentLlanddwyn Island National Nature Reserve [1] [2]
HeritageGrade II listed building Edit this on Wikidata
Tŵr Bach Lighthouse
Twr Bach - geograph.org.uk - 858115.jpg
This beacon is older than Tŵr Mawr lighthouse
LocationYnys Llanddwyn
Anglesey
Wales
United Kingdom
Coordinates53°08′03″N 4°24′46″W / 53.134238°N 4.412894°W / 53.134238; -4.412894
Year first constructedearly 1800s
Year first lit1975
Automated1975
Deactivated1975 Edit this on Wikidata
Constructionstone tower
Tower shapeconical tower with light on the top
Markings / patternwhite tower
Tower height5 metres (16 ft)
Focal height12 metres (39 ft)
Light sourcesolar power
Range7 nautical mile, 4 nautical mile Edit this on Wikidata
CharacteristicFl WR 2.5s.
Admiralty numberA5210
NGA number5528
ARLHS numberWAL-046
Managing agentLlanddwyn Island National Nature Reserve [3][4]
HeritageGrade II listed building Edit this on Wikidata

Tŵr Mawr lighthouse (meaning "great tower" in Welsh), on Ynys Llanddwyn on Anglesey, Wales, marks the western entrance to the Menai Strait.

History[edit]

The 1873 tower is tapered in a style characteristic of Anglesey windmills. It is 33 feet (10 m) high and 18 feet (5.5 m) in diameter. It may have been constructed by an Anglesey stone mason, and it is possible that the tower itself was originally used as a windmill.

The lantern and fittings cost £250 7s 6d, including the adaptation of an "earlier tower". The north-east door is flanked by small windows, and the two floors above also have small windows, but the top does not. The conical roof is slated and has a flagpole. The present lantern window is about 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) by 2 feet (0.61 m). The optic, silver-plated reflector and Fresnel lens are dated 1861 and were used into the 1970s. The lantern was originally lit by six Argand lamps with reflectors.

A smaller, conical tower, with a domed top, can be found to the south-east, and may be an earlier structure. The walls are 6 feet 8 inches (2.03 m) in radius and 3 feet (0.91 m) thick, with a door to the north-west, and show signs of cracking to the rubble-filled walls on the west.

Neither tower is shown on the chart of Lewis Morris, dated 1800, but they both appear on the Ordnance Survey 1818-1823 2 inches/mile map. They both probably originated as unlit markers. The cottages nearby have been used as craft workshops, and the local community here once serviced pilot-boats and lifeboats.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Twr Mawr The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 1 June 2016
  2. ^ Twr Mawr Light Lighthouse Explorer. Retrieved 1 June 2016
  3. ^ Twr Bach The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 1 June 2016
  4. ^ Twr Bach Light Lighthouse Explorer. Retrieved 1 June 2016

External links[edit]