Lloyd Cook

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Lloyd Cook
Lloyd Cook.jpg
Born (1890-03-21)March 21, 1890
Lynden, ON, CAN
Died October 9, 1964(1964-10-09) (aged 74)
Taber, AB, CAN
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Defenceman
Shot Left
Played for Vancouver Millionaires
Spokane Canaries
Vancouver Maroons
Boston Bruins
Playing career 1912–1931

Lloyd "Farmer" Cook (March 21, 1890 – October 9, 1964) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman. He played for the Vancouver Millionaires/Maroons and Spokane Canaries of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association and for the Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League. He won the Stanley Cup in 1915 with the Millionaires and was named to the PCHA first all-star team three times.

Early career[edit]

Cook was born in Lynden, Ontario, in 1890. In 1912–13, he played for the Fernie Ghostriders of the BHL and the Taber Chiefs of the ASHL. The following season, he played for the ASHL's Edmonton Dominions, scoring eight goals in four regular season games and four goals in seven playoff games. He was named to the league's first all-star team.[1]

Pacific Coast Hockey Association[edit]

From 1914 to 1924, Cook played in the PCHA. He joined the Vancouver Millionaires in 1914–15 and had 17 points in 17 regular season games. In the 1915 Stanley Cup Finals, he scored three goals in three games to help Vancouver win the Stanley Cup.[1][2] The following season, Cook scored 18 goals in 18 games. He then played for the Spokane Canaries in 1916-17, where he was teammates with his younger brother, Leo.[1][3]

In 1917–18, Cook returned to Vancouver, where he would play until 1924. He managed the team in 1919–20, and that season, he had 14 points in 21 games and was named to the PCHA first all-star team.[1][4] The following season, he had 21 points in 24 games and was again named to the first all-star team. In 1922–23, Cook had a career-high 30 points in 30 games and was named to the first all-star team for the last time.[1]

Later career[edit]

In 1924, Cook was traded to the NHL's Boston Bruins. He played four games for Boston in 1924–25, scoring one goal. Cook then played in the California Professional League from 1925 to 1931. He played for teams in Culver City, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.[1] In 1931–32, he was the head coach of the San Francisco Rangers, leading the team to a 12-12-6 record.[5] Cook died in 1964.[6]

Statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1912–13 Taber Chiefs ASHL 2 1 0 1 4
1913–14 Edmonton Dominions ASHL 4 8 0 8 13
1914–15 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 17 11 6 17 15
Stanley Cup 3 3 0 3 9
1915–16 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 18 18 3 21 24
1916–17 Spokane Canaries PCHA 23 13 9 22 32
1917–18 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 18 6 4 10 11 2 0 0 0 0
Stanley Cup 5 2 0 2 12
1919 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 20 8 6 14 22 2 1 0 1 0
1919–20 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 21 10 4 14 15 2 1 0 1 0
1920–21 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 12 9 21 18 2 1 1 2 0
Stanley Cup 5 2 0 2 20
1921–22 Vancouver Millionaires PCHA 24 2 3 5 9 2 1 0 1 0
West-P 2 1 0 1 2
Stanley Cup 5 1 0 1 6
1922–23 Vancouver Maroons PCHA 30 19 11 30 33 2 0 0 0 6
Stanley Cup 4 0 1 1 4
1923–24 Vancouver Maroons PCHA 28 7 5 12 18 2 0 1 1 0
West-P 3 2 1 3 2
Stanley Cup 2 0 0 0 4
1924–25 Boston Bruins NHL 4 1 0 1 0
1925–26 Culver City Pros Cal-Pro 30 8 3 11 18
1926–27 LA Globe Ice Cream Cal-Pro 30
1927–28 Los Angeles Richfields Cal-Pro 22 13 2 15 18
1928–29 San Francisco Tigers Cal-Pro 36 8 4 12 14
1929–30 San Francisco Tigers Cal-Pro 36 4 3 7
1930–31 San Francisco Tigers Cal-Pro 27 8 6 14
PCHA totals 223 106 60 166 197 14 4 2 6 6
Stanley Cup totals 24 8 1 9 55

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Lloyd Cook". legendsofhockey.net. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  2. ^ "Vancouver Arena Destroyed by Fire". The Montreal Gazette. August 21, 1936.
  3. ^ "Seattle Hockey Team Gets Cook". Spokane Daily Chronicle. January 8, 1918.
  4. ^ "Pacific Coast Hockey Race Promises to be a Thriller; Can Seattle Champs Repeat?". Ottawa Citizen. December 18, 1920.
  5. ^ "Lloyd Cook". hockeydb.com. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  6. ^ "Lloyd Cook". hockey-reference.com. Retrieved February 26, 2014.

External links[edit]