Loa Ho

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Loa Ho.

Loa Ho (Chinese: 賴和; pinyin: Lai He; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Loā Hô) (28 May 1894 – 31 January 1943) was a Taiwanese poet who was born in Changhua Hsien, Taiwan Prefecture, Fujian-Taiwan-Province, Qing Taiwan (modern-day Changhua, Taiwan). He was a medical doctor but had enormous fame in literature. His poetry works were especially praised, and Lai was commonly known as one of Taiwan's most representative poets. He is also hailed as the "Father of Modern Taiwanese Literature".

Early life[edit]

Loa's work can broadly be divided into three phases. During his early career, he wrote primarily classical Chinese poetry. On a sojourn as a doctor in a Japanese hospital in Amoy (now called Xiamen), a treaty port in China, he became acquainted with the work of Chinese May Fourth writers such as Lu Hsun. Although his stay in China seems to have been depressing, he returned to Taiwan with the intention to contribute to Taiwan's cultural scene. He opened a reading room in his clinic where he provided Chinese vernacular fiction as well as Japanese periodicals. This reading room allowed him to mentor several important writers of the late Japanese colonial period. Most of his writing during this second period was nativist in his choice of themes and satirical in form. Through several short stories written during the 1920s and early 1930s, Loa satirized the brutality of colonial policemen, the indifference of the populace, and the impotence of native intellectuals. During the third period, Loa became more nativist in orientation and actively experimented with writing in Taiwanese Hokkien. Although these experiments were not entirely successful, they expressed an emerging Taiwanese national consciousness upon which later Taiwanese writers would build.

Political activity and legacy[edit]

In addition to his writing, Loa participated in the Taiwanese Cultural Association and other activist groups. His political activity led to his arrest and a subsequent illness contracted in jail, which caused his early demise. Japanese wartime strictures on writing in languages other than the national language forced him to stop his literary output slightly before his death. He was an influence on his younger contemporaries Yang Kui and Wu Chuo-liu. His rediscovery during the late 1970s and early 1980s also contributed to Taiwan's new nativist literature.

Literature works[edit]

Source:[1]

Fiction[edit]

  • Loa, Ho (1996). "The Advocate". Oxcart : nativist stories from Taiwan 1934 - 1977. Tr. by Rosemary Haddon. Dortmund: Projekt-Verl. pp. 59–72. ISBN 9783928861571.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by Llyod Sciban and Shu-ning Sciban. 獄中日記 [A Diary in Jail]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 155–64. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by John Balcom. 不如意的過年 [A Dissatisfying New Year]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 41–48. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2006). Tr. by Sylvia Li-chun Lin. 鬥鬧熱 [Festival High Jinks]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (19): 19–26. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by Yingtsih Hwang. 歸家 [The Homecoming]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 49–54. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by John Balcolm. 惹事 [Making Trouble]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 25–40. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by Llyod and Shu-ning Sciban. 前進 [Progress]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 149–54. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by Yingtsih Hwang. 赴了春宴回來 [Returning from a Spring Banquet]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 55–58. OCLC 607653193.
  • Loa, Ho (2004). Tr. by Howard Goldblatt. 一桿稱仔 [The Steelyard]. Taiwan literature, English translation series. University of California, Santa Barbara (15): 15–24. OCLC 607653193. also Loa, Ho (1983). "The Steelyard". In Lau, Joseph S.M. (ed.). The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Fiction from Taiwan fiction since 1926. Tr. Jane Parish Yang. Bloomington: Indiana Univ. Pr. pp. 3–11. ISBN 9780253361622.

Poetry[edit]

  • Poems in: Taiwan Literature, English Translation Series 15 (2004): 165-76.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Translations by Author K – L". MCLC Resource Center. Ohio State University. Retrieved 1 January 2015.