Loch Lomond and Cowal Way

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Loch Lomond & Cowal Way
Cowal Way marker post above the Donich Water (geograph 5477451).jpg
Cowal Way marker post above Donich Water
Length92 km (57 mi)
LocationCowal, Argyll and Bute, Scotland
Established2000
DesignationScotland’s Great Trails
Trailheads
UseHiking, Biking
Elevation
Elevation gain/loss1,810 metres (5,940 ft) gain[1]
Highest point520 m (1,710 ft)
Lowest pointSea Level
Hiking details
SeasonAll Year
WaymarkYes
Websitehttp://www.lochlomondandcowalway.org

The Loch Lomond and Cowal Way is a waymarked footpath through the Cowal peninsula, in Argyll and Bute, between Portavadie on Cowal and Inveruglas on Loch Lomond side.[2] It was formerly known as the Cowal Way, but was renamed in December 2018 to reflect the fact that half of the route lies with the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park.[3] The way is 92 kilometres (57 mi) long,[4][5][6][7] and is suitable for both walkers and mountain bikers.[4] Much of the route is also suitable for experienced horseriders, although in some places steps, narrow footbridges and gates may restrict access for horses. A review to identify these obstacles and suggest alternative routes and/or remedial measures was undertaken in 2016.[8]

The route was first established in 2000,[4] and is managed by the Colintraive and Glendaruel Development Trust.[9] It was renamed in 2018 to in order to increase usage of the trail, as the Trust considered that Loch Lomond had higher brand recognition in the target markets.[3]

Since 2016 the trail has been listed as one of Scotland's Great Trails by Scottish Natural Heritage.[10] The route is fully waymarked with the Loch Lomond and Cowal Way logo, which depicts a stylised image of a path in a landscape of hills and lochs.[11][12] The trail links directly to another of the Great Trails, the Three Lochs Way, which shares the section between Arrochar and Inveruglas.[13][14][15] There are also indirect links to three further Great Trails at both end points of the Loch Lomond and Cowal Way: at Portavadie there is a Caledonian MacBrayne ferry service to Tarbert, which is one of termini of the Kintyre Way, whilst at Inveruglas there is a passenger ferry across Loch Lomond to Inversnaid, which is one of the termini of the Great Trossachs Path, and lies on the West Highland Way.[16][17][15]

As of 2018 around 45,000 people use the way each year, of whom over 3,000 walk, cycle or run the complete route. The top five markets for users are Scotland, England, the Netherlands, Germany, and North America.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Trails". Scotland's Great Trails. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  2. ^ "Loch Lomond and Cowal Way". Scotland's Great Trails. Retrieved 2018-12-22.
  3. ^ a b c "Cowal Way becomes Loch Lomond & Cowal Way" (PDF). Loch Lomond and Cowal Way. 2018-11-01. Retrieved 2019-01-03.
  4. ^ a b c "The Cowal Way". Cowal Way. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  5. ^ "The Cowal Way". WalkHighlands. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Cowal Way". Long Distance Walkers Association. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Cowal Way". GPS Cycle and Walking Routes. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  8. ^ Vyv Wood-Gee (May 2016). "Cowal Way Multi-use Access Notes" (PDF). Cowal Way. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  9. ^ "Who We Are". Cowal Way. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  10. ^ "The Cowal Way joins the SGT family". Scotland's Great Trails. 2016-10-20. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  11. ^ "Cowal Way News" (PDF). Cowal Way. Autumn 2015. Retrieved 2018-08-22.
  12. ^ "FAQs". Cowal Way. Retrieved 2018-08-22.
  13. ^ "Arrochar to Inveruglas". Three Lochs Way. Retrieved 2018-08-20.
  14. ^ "Lochgoilhead to Inveruglas". Cowal Way. Retrieved 2018-08-20.
  15. ^ a b "The Cowal Way". Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Retrieved 2018-08-21.
  16. ^ Ordnance Survey. 1:50000 Landranger Sheet 56. Lomond & Inveraray.
  17. ^ Ordnance Survey. 1:50000 Landranger Sheet 62. North Kintyre & Tarbert.

External links[edit]