Lochluichart railway station

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Lochluichart National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Loch Laoicheart[1]
Lochluichart railway station in 2009.jpg
Location
PlaceLochluichart
Local authorityHighland
Coordinates57°37′18″N 4°48′33″W / 57.6218°N 4.8091°W / 57.6218; -4.8091Coordinates: 57°37′18″N 4°48′33″W / 57.6218°N 4.8091°W / 57.6218; -4.8091
Grid referenceNH323625
Operations
Station codeLCC
Managed byAbellio ScotRail
Number of platforms1
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2014/15Decrease 482
2015/16Increase 608
2016/17Decrease 532
2017/18Increase 632
2018/19Decrease 180
History
Original companyDingwall and Skye Railway
Pre-groupingHighland Railway
Post-groupingLMS
1 August 1871Opened as Lochluichart High[2]
3 May 1954Resited and renamed as 'Lochluichart[2]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Lochluichart from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Lochluichart railway station is a railway station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line, serving the village of Lochluichart in the north of Scotland. Lochluichart is located at the north edge of Loch Luichart.

The station is 17 miles 20 chains (27.8 km) from Dingwall, and has a single platform which is long enough for a three-coach train.[3]

History[edit]

The station was opened as Lochluichart High[2] by the Dingwall and Skye Railway on 1 August 1871 as a private station for Lady Ashburnton on the Lochluichart Estate. Became a public station by 1887.[4]

In 1949 Lochluichart was planned to be relocated to allow the flooding of the area by the Glascarnoch-Luichart-Torr Achilty hydroelectric scheme.[5] On 3 May 1954 a new station was opened as Lochluichart[2] as a result of a hydro electric scheme raising the level of Loch Luichart, constructed of red sandstone. The deviation required about 2-mile (3.2 km) on stone-pitched embankments and in rock cuttings, a 100-foot (30 m) bridge over the River Conon and a 36-foot (11 m) bridge.[6]

Services[edit]

Four trains each way call (on request) on weekdays/Saturdays and one each way all year on Sundays, plus a second from May to late September only.[7]


Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Garve   Abellio ScotRail
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Achanalt
  Historical railways  
Garve   Highland Railway
Dingwall and Skye Railway
  Achanalt

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brailsford 2017, Gaelic/English Station Index.
  2. ^ a b c d Butt (1995), page 147
  3. ^ Brailsford 2017, map 22F.
  4. ^ Private and Untimetabled Railway Stations by G.Croughton page 96
  5. ^ "A Station To Be Moved". Dundee Courier. Scotland. 6 May 1949. Retrieved 15 November 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ Cooke, B.W.C., ed. (June 1954). "Re-Siting of Lochluichart Station". The Railway Magazine. Vol. 100 no. 638. Westminster: Tothill Press. p. 432.
  7. ^ GB eNRT May 2016 Edition, Table 239

Sources[edit]

  • Brailsford, Martyn, ed. (December 2017) [1987]. Railway Track Diagrams 1: Scotland & Isle of Man (6th ed.). Frome: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-9-8.
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  • Jowett, Alan (2000). Jowett's Nationalised Railway Atlas (1st ed.). Penryn, Cornwall: Atlantic Transport Publishers. ISBN 978-0-906899-99-1. OCLC 228266687.
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137.

External links[edit]