Lodi, New Jersey

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Lodi, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Lodi
Map highlighting Lodi's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Lodi's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lodi, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lodi, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′40″N 74°04′57″W / 40.877915°N 74.0825°W / 40.877915; -74.0825Coordinates: 40°52′40″N 74°04′57″W / 40.877915°N 74.0825°W / 40.877915; -74.0825[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated December 22, 1894
Named for Lodi, Lombardy, Italy
Government[8]
 • Type 1923 Municipal Manager Law
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor Emil Carafa Jr. (term ends June 30, 2017)[3][4]
 • Manager Bruce T. Masopust[5][6]
 • Municipal clerk Debra A. Ciliento[7]
Area[1]
 • Total 2.285 sq mi (5.918 km2)
 • Land 2.265 sq mi (5.865 km2)
 • Water 0.020 sq mi (0.053 km2)  0.89%
Area rank 390th of 566 in state
44th of 70 in county[1]
Elevation[9] 30 ft (9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 24,136
 • Estimate (2016)[13] 24,778
 • Rank 101st of 566 in state
11th of 70 in county[14]
 • Density 10,657.6/sq mi (4,114.9/km2)
 • Density rank 33rd of 566 in state
9th of 70 in county[14]
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−4 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code 07644[15][16]
Area code(s) 201 and 973[17]
FIPS code 3400341100[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 885284[1][20]
Website lodi-nj.org

Lodi (/ˈld/ LOH-dy) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 24,136,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 165 (+0.7%) from the 23,971 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,616 (+7.2%) from the 22,355 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Lodi owes its name to the Italian city of Lodi, Lombardy.[22][23][24] It was incorporated as a borough on December 22, 1894, from portions of the now-defunct municipalities of Lodi Township (now South Hackensack) and Saddle River Township (now Saddle Brook), at the height of Bergen County's "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, based on the results of a referendum held on the previous day.[25][26]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 2.285 square miles (5.918 km2), including 2.265 square miles (5.865 km2) of land and 0.020 square miles (0.053 km2) of water (0.89%)was water.[1][2] Areas of the borough are prone to flooding during heavy rain.

The borough borders Garfield, Hackensack, Hasbrouck Heights, Maywood, Rochelle Park, Saddle Brook, South Hackensack, Hackensack and Wood-Ridge.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880986
18909981.2%
19001,91792.1%
19104,138115.9%
19208,17597.6%
193011,54941.3%
194011,5520.0%
195015,39233.2%
196023,50252.7%
197025,1637.1%
198023,956−4.8%
199022,355−6.7%
200023,9717.2%
201024,1360.7%
Est. 201624,778[13][28]2.7%
Population sources: 1880–1890[29]
1890–1920[30] 1890–1910[31]
1910–1930[32] 1900–2010[33][34][35]
2000[36][37] 2010[10][11][12]

2010 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 24,136 people, 9,471 households, and 6,109 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,657.6 per square mile (4,114.9/km2). There were 10,127 housing units at an average density of 4,471.7 per square mile (1,726.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 68.19% (16,459) White, 7.52% (1,816) Black or African American, 0.42% (101) Native American, 8.57% (2,069) Asian, 0.06% (15) Pacific Islander, 11.49% (2,774) from other races, and 3.74% (902) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 30.49% (7,360) of the population.[10]

There were 9,471 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.18.[10]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.7 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 86.7 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $55,541 (with a margin of error of ±$3,430) and the median family income was $65,494 (±$4,924). Males had a median income of $49,002 (±$4,353) versus $37,108 (±$5,243) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,910 (±$1,786). About 10.1% of families and 12.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.[38]

Same-sex couples headed 64 households in 2010, an increase from the 44 counted a decade earlier.[39]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 23,971 people, 9,528 households, and 6,097 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,590.6 people per square mile (4,095.2/km2). There were 9,908 housing units at an average density of 4,377.4 per square mile (1,692.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.16% White, 3.55% African American, 0.17% Native American, 8.86% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.25% from other races, and 2.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.98% of the population.[36][37]

There were 9,528 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.6% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.0% were non-families. Of all households 30.1% were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.16.[36][37]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the borough was $43,421, and the median income for a family was $51,959. Males had a median income of $38,781 versus $31,253 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,667. About 5.3% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.9% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lodi operates under the 1923 Municipal Manager Law form of New Jersey municipal government. The voters elect five members to a council who are elected at-large in non-partisan elections held as part of the May municipal election to serve four-year terms of office on a concurrent basis.[8] A mayor and deputy mayor are selected by the council from among its members. The council is an exclusively legislative body with responsibility for day-to-day operation of the borough assigned to a manager who acts as the municipal chief executive and executes laws and policies, prepares the budget for council consideration and attends and participates at meetings with a voice, but no vote. The manager recommends improvements and implements those approved, as well as oversees contracts and franchises and reports violations. It is the responsibility of the manager to appoint and remove department heads and make all additional appointments not made by the council.[40]

As of 2017, members of the Lodi Township Council are Mayor Emil Carafa Jr. (term as mayor ends June 30, 2017), Deputy Mayor Laura E. Cima (term as deputy mayor ends June 30, 2017), Albert DiChiara (appointed to serve an unexpired term), Patricia Ann Licata and Vincent Martin, all of whom were elected in May 2015 and serve terms of office that expire on June 30, 2019.[3][41][42][43]

In January 2016, the Township Council appointed Albert DiChiara to fill the seat vacated by Bruce Masopust when he took office as Borough Manager; DiChiara will serve until a special vote held as part of the November 2016 general election.[44]

In February 2015, the township council selected Emil Carafa Jr., to fill the vacant council seat of Mayor Marc Schrieks, who left office to take a position in the administration of County Executive James J. Tedesco III, while Bruce Masopust was chosen to succeed Schrieks in his role as mayor.[45]

Schrieks was elected by the council as mayor on July 1, 2008, and served until June 30, 2009, making him the youngest person to ever serve as its Mayor.[46] Karen Viscana was the first woman in Lodi history to serve as mayor when she was sworn into office in 2008.[47]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lodi is located in the 5th Congressional District[48] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[11][49][50] Prior to the 2010 Census, Lodi had been part of the 9th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[51]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[53] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[54][55]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 38th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus) and in the General Assembly by Lisa Swain (D, Fair Lawn) and Chris Tully (D, Bergenfield).[56][57] In May 2018, Lagana took the Senate seat after Robert M. Gordon left office, while Swain and Tully took the seats vacated by Tim Eustace and Lagana.[58] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[59] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[60]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. The freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year; a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore are selected from among its seven members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[61][62] As of 2018, the County Executive is Democratic James J. Tedesco III of Paramus, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[63] Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman ends 2018),[64] Freeholder Vice-Chairwoman Germaine M. Ortiz (D, Emerson, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder vice-chairwoman ends 2018),[65] Freeholder Chairman Pro-Tempore Mary J. Amoroso (D, Mahwah, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as freeholder chairman pro-tempore ends 2018),[66] David L. Ganz (D, Fair Lawn, 2020),[67] Steve Tanelli (D, North Arlington, 2018),[68] Joan Voss (D, Fort Lee, 2020)[69] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, Franklin Lakes, 2018),[70][71][72][61] Bergen County's constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale, 2021),[73][74] Sheriff Michael Saudino (D, Emerson, 2019)[75][76] and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill, 2021).[77][78][61][79]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 11,177 registered voters in Lodi, of which 4,043 (36.2% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,324 (11.8% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 5,805 (51.9% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[80] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 46.3% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 58.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[80][81]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 5,420 votes (67.2% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,508 votes (31.1% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 56 votes (0.7% vs. 0.9%), among the 8,070 ballots cast by the borough's 12,305 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.6% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[82][83] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 5,174 votes (59.7% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,358 votes (38.7% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 70 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 8,667 ballots cast by the borough's 11,983 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.3% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[84][85] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 4,696 votes (57.9% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 3,344 votes (41.2% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 52 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 8,115 ballots cast by the borough's 11,598 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.0% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[86]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.0% of the vote (2,135 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 46.9% (1,924 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (46 votes), among the 4,256 ballots cast by the borough's 11,672 registered voters (151 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.5%.[87][88] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 2,651 ballots cast (56.2% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 1,834 votes (38.9% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 173 votes (3.7% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 33 votes (0.7% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,720 ballots cast by the borough's 11,546 registered voters, yielding a 40.9% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[89][90]

Emergency services[edit]

The Lodi Police Department operates out of the Borough Hall. the police department has 47 sworn officers. The department is broken into several Dividion including; Patrol Division, Detective Division, Records, Traffic, and Operation/Community Policing. The current Department's Chief of Police is Acting Chief Donald Scorzetti.[91]

The Fire Department is manned by approximately 76 volunteer firefighters belonging to four different companies located at three different fire houses throughout the borough. Richard Dowson of Hose Company # 1 is Chief of the Department, Ronald Cannici of Fire Company # 1 is 1st Assistant Chief, Steven Cassiello of Hose Company # 2 is 2nd Assistant Chief, Moses Owen of Rescue Truck Company # 1 is 3rd Assistant Chief. The Lodi Fire Department is equipped with six pieces of apparatus (three engines, one ladder, one rescue, one foam truck) at the following locations:

  • Fire Company # 1, which is located on Westervelt Place, houses Engine 612 and Foam Unit 616
  • Fire Headquarters, which houses Hose Company #1 and Rescue Truck Co # 1, located on Graham Lane, houses Engine 615, Ladder 613, and Rescue 611
  • Hose Company # 2, which is located on Kennedy Drive, houses Engine 614

Each Firehouse is equipped with a rescue boat for flood and water rescue emergencies.

The Lodi Fire Department responds to about 500+ calls per year, including mutual aid to neighboring municipalities including Garfield, Saddle Brook, Hasbrouck Heights, Rochelle Park, Maywood, Elmwood Park, Wallington and other South Bergen towns when needed. [92]

The Lodi Volunteer Ambulance and Rescue Squad is located at 72 Kimmig. For 2018 Chris Perrelli is the captain and Kaetlynn Ayala is the president. LVARS renders aid with three Type III ambulances; EMS 1, 2, and 3, as well as a Fire Rehab Unit (Rehab 4). LVARS responds to roughly 2,000 requests for aid per year.

Education[edit]

The Lodi Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its seven schools had an enrollment of 3,486 students and 234.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.9:1.[93] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[94]) are Columbus Elementary School[95] (291 students; in grades K-5), Hilltop Elementary School[96] (385; PreK-5), Roosevelt Elementary School[97] (174; PreK-5), Washington Elementary School[98] (408; PreK-5), Wilson Elementary School[99] (347; PreK-5), Thomas Jefferson Middle School[100] (706) for grades 6-8 and Lodi High School[101] (939) for grades 9-12.[102]

Bergen Arts and Science Charter School serves public school students from Lodi, as well as those from Garfield and Hackensack.[103]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[104][105]

Immaculate Conception High School is an all-girls college-preparatory high school founded in 1915 by the Felician Sisters that operates under the jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[106][107]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 40.00 miles (64.37 km) of roadways, of which 32.24 miles (51.89 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.56 miles (7.34 km) by Bergen County and 3.20 miles (5.15 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[108]

Route 17, U.S. Route 46 and Interstate 80 pass through Lodi.[109]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit bus routes 144, 161 and 164 offer service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, while 709, 712 and 780 provide local service.[110][111]

In media and culture[edit]

Lodi is home to the transmitter and towers for New York radio station WABC.[109][112]

The Satin Dolls go-go bar in Lodi was used as the filming location for the fictional Bada Bing bar in the HBO drama television series The Sopranos (1999-2007).[113][114] Lodi High School and various stores in the borough were also used as filming locations.[109]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Lodi include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Borough of Lodi. Accessed June 7, 2017.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. ^ Manager's Office, Borough of Lodi. Accessed June 19, 2016.
  6. ^ Jongsma, Joshua. "Former Lodi Mayor Transitions To New Role As Borough Manager", Garfield-Lodi Daily Voice, January 7, 2016. Accessed June 19, 2016. "Bruce T. Masopust brought his years of Lodi experience from the local council and school system into his new role as borough manager."
  7. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Lodi. Accessed December 19, 2011.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 160.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Lodi, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Lodi borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Lodi borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lodi, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 19, 2011.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Lodi, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  18. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  22. ^ Van Valen, James M. History of Bergen County, New Jersey, p. 354. New Jersey Publishing and Engraving Company, 1900. Accessed November 12, 2015. "Lodi was named from a flourishing town of Italy founded by the Bois and colonized by the father of Pompeii the Great."
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 3, 2015.
  24. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 189. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed September 3, 2015.
  25. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 80. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  26. ^ History of Bergen County, New Jersey, 1630–1923, p. 377 shows formation date of October 25, 1894, and only Lodi Township as parent municipality.
  27. ^ Areas touching Lodi, MapIt. Accessed January 7, 2015.
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  29. ^ Report on Population of the United States at the Eleventh Census: 1890. Part I, p. 238. United States Census Bureau, 1895. Accessed October 20, 2016.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726–1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  31. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed October 20, 2013.
  32. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed December 19, 2011.
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  35. ^ Historical Population Trends in bergen County (1900–2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  36. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Lodi borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Lodi borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 7, 2013.
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  39. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record, August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed September 27, 2014.
  40. ^ How Lodi's Government Works, Borough of Lodi. Accessed February 8, 2008.
  41. ^ 2016 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Lodi. Accessed June 19, 2016.
  42. ^ 2017 County and Municipal Directory, p. 49, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  43. ^ Seasly, John. "Lodi names Emil Carafa mayor at borough's reorganization meeting", The Record (Bergen County), July 1, 2015. Accessed July 2, 2015. "The borough council appointed Emil Carafa Jr. as mayor and swore in newcomer Vincent Martin at its reorganization meeting Wednesday.... The council unanimously approved of Carafa's one-year appointment as mayor.... Borough Clerk Debra Ciliento announced the council members' certified election results: Bruce Masopust had 1,414 votes; Carafa had 1,346; Martin had 1,305; Patricia Licata had 1,250; and Laura Cima had 1,178."
  44. ^ Clark, Susan Joy. "New councilman appointed in Lodi", Community News (Lodi Edition), January 28, 2016. Accessed June 19, 2016. "The Lodi Council has selected Albert DiChiara to fill a vacancy on the governing body.He will fill the seat of Bruce Masopust, who gave up his position when he was appointed as borough manager."
  45. ^ Clark, Susan Joy. "Former Lodi councilman joining the governing body", Community News (Lodi edition), February 19, 2015. Accessed July 2, 2015. "Emil Carafa was appointed to the Lodi Council.Former Mayor Marc Schrieks stepped down from his position as mayor and from the council to take a job in Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco's office. The council voted Bruce Masopust to replace Schrieks as mayor."
  46. ^ Clark, Susan Joy. "Nine looking to fill five seats on Lodi Council", Community News, May 5, 2011. Accessed December 19, 2011. "Schrieks has served three terms on the council. 'First and foremost, I'm humbled every year that the residents think enough of me to re-elect me three times. I think I'm the longest serving consecutive public servant in Lodi. I know I was the youngest serving mayor.'"
  47. ^ Maglionico, Artie. "One Life in Lodi: Mayor Karen Viscana", Lodi Memorial Library, July 2007. Accessed July 8, 2008. "As a child growing up on Garden Street in Lodi, Karen Viscana remembers a warm, family oriented community where neighbors looked out for one another and the sights and sounds of youngsters at play echoed in every household. Karen, who recently became her Borough's first woman Mayor, has carried this same warmth and caring into adulthood."
  48. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ 2017 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 30, 2017.
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  53. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  54. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  55. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  56. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 3, 2018.
  57. ^ District 38 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 3, 2018.
  58. ^ Johnson, Brent. "Meet your 3 new state lawmakers, New Jersey", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, May 25, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2018. "Swain, the former mayor of Fair Lawn, and Tully, the former council president in Bergenfield, will be district mates. They replace Joseph Lagana, who moved up to the state Senate last month when state Sen. Robert Gordon resigned to join the state Board of Public Utilities, and Tim Eustace, who resigned last month to take a job outside of state government."
  59. ^ Governor Phil Murphy, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018.
  60. ^ Lieutenant Governor Oliver, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018. "Assemblywoman Oliver has resided in the City of East Orange for over 40 years."
  61. ^ a b c 2018 County and Municipal Directory, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed June 5, 2018.
  62. ^ Freeholders, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed October 26, 2017.
  63. ^ County Executive, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
  64. ^ Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2018.
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