Logsdon Seminary

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Logsdon Seminary
Motto Humility, Compassion, and Courage.
Type Private
Affiliation Baptist General Convention of Texas
Cooperative Baptist Fellowship
Academic affiliation
ATS
SACS
Dean Donald D. Williford, PhD
Campus Abilene, TX
Corpus Christi, TX
DFW, TX
Lubbock, TX
McAllen, TX
San Antonio, TX
Website logsdonseminary.org

Logsdon Seminary of Hardin-Simmons University is a Baptist theological seminary in Abilene, Texas. The school offers the Master of Divinity degree, the Master of Arts (Religion) degree, the Master of Arts in Family Ministry, and the Doctor of Ministry degree.[1]

Founding[edit]

Logsdon Seminary’s founding was largely shaped by the purpose of Hardin-Simmons University "To bring young men and women to Christ; to teach them of Christ; to train them for Christ.” The Logsdon School of Theology, was named for Charles and Koreen Logsdon of Abilene. Mrs. Logsdon made the largest gift in the university’s history to that date to establish the Logsdon School of Theology in memory of her husband. Construction for the school was completed in 1989 and it is located on the southeastern corner of Hardin-Simmons University’s campus. The complex features classrooms, a distance learning and preaching facilities, and the Logsdon Chapel. In 1995, Logsdon School of Theology began offering seminary programs and by 2004 the HSU trustees officially established Logsdon Seminary.[2]

Logsdon Chapel[edit]

The focal point of the school is the Logsdon Chapel. Construction for the Logsdon School of Theology began in 1988. It is located on the southeastern corner of Hardin-Simmons University’s campus, just seconds from Interstate 20. The 350-seat chapel space is illuminated by a breathtaking stained-glass window at the front and at the back, a musical treasure: a Vissar-Rowland Opus 93 pipe organ inscribed with the words: 'Soli Deo Gloria.'

Dr. H.K. Neely, Logsdon’s first dean, consulted with the Byrd Glass Company of Lubbock, Texas to design and construct the Logsdon Chapel stained-glass window. Constructed of 60 individual panels, the 30-by-41 foot wall creates a magnificent kaleidoscope of light. A magnificent piece of Christian art, the window symbolizes the purpose, mission, and vision of Logsdon School of Theology: a cross, an open Bible, and a dove. Centered in the window, the cross signifies the centrality of the living Christ. The open Bible represents the authority of the Bible as the essential and trustworthy guide for life and faith. The dove represents the Holy Spirit’s presence in the global mission of the church. These elements are encircled, representing the students call to serve the world.

The Grace Katherine White Organ, named for Mrs. Katherine Logsdon White, sister of Mr. Charles Logsdon, was constructed in 1992 and likewise warrants a sense of grandiosity. The Vissar-Rowland Opus 93 pipe organ was based on a conventional North German-Dutch design.[3]

Distinctives[edit]

The purpose of Logsdon Seminary is to prepare servant leaders for Christian ministry through an academically challenging theological education centered on the Lordship of Christ, guided by the authority of Scripture, and focused on the global mission of the church.[4]

Spiritual Formation[edit]

Spiritual Formation is an integral part of the Logsdon Seminary degrees. In addition to curriculum focused on spiritual formation, students also participate in activities designed for soul development. Logsdon is dedicated to the holistic spiritual growth of seminary students for transformative ministry. Students participate in weekly worship corporately or in small groups, followed by a community lunch and table talk. Each spring a spiritual formation retreat provides students with an opportunity for soulful reflection at the mid-point of their programs. Students participate in a variety of conferences for spiritual and ministerial growth, including annual conferences at Logsdon on scripture, ethics, and faith and culture.[5]

Pedagogy[edit]

Classes at Logsdon are intentionally small to facilitate an environment that is dialogical and participatory, not merely lecture oriented. Following a seminar model to allow students and faculty to mature and grow together. The environment is one of critical thinking and varied perspectives, allowing students to engage biblical and theological issues creatively rather than merely reinforce presuppositions. As a result, Logsdon Seminary is a thoughtful and hospitable community for study, interpretation and con¬versation. This provides an environment in which persons may safely explore ideas in the journey toward a faith seeking understanding.

Students[edit]

Logsdon fully affirms both men and women to all positions of vocation ministry in and through the Church. Though a Baptist seminary, Logsdon has a rich diversity and welcomes persons from all Christian denominations. Logsdon Seminary has a diverse student community who come from all over the world. Approximately 35% of the master’s-level students at Logsdon are female, and just over 30% of the total student body are of non-Caucasian descent. Some of our extension campuses reflect an even greater ethnic diversity. For example, about 50% of the students at the DFW campus are non- Caucasian, and over 70% of the students in San Antonio are of black, African, Hispanic, or Asian ethnicity. This robust diversity enriches the learning experience of the entire seminary family.

Deans of Logsdon School of Theology and Logsdon Seminary[edit]

  • H.K. Neely, Jr., first dean (1983-1998)
  • M. Vernon Davis, second dean (1998-2003)
  • Thomas V. Brisco, third dean (2003-2011)
  • Donald D. Williford, fourth and current dean (2011–present)[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°28′30″N 99°43′57″W / 32.4751°N 99.7326°W / 32.4751; -99.7326