Lokaksema (Hindu prayer)

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Lokaksema or Lokakshema is a Sanskrit word meaning Global Wellbeing. Loka means world and Kshema means welfare in Sanskrit.

It is normally used in the context of various prayers and rituals performed in Hinduism. For example, there could be a big ritual yagna conducted for some common good such as a blessing for rains. It could also be used in the context of public prayers or mass chanting of mantras for a social cause.

Many Hindu rituals and ceremonies end with a generic prayers such as Lokāḥ Samastāḥ Sukhino Bhavantu, or alternatively, "lokas-samastah sukhino bhavamtu", meaning " Let the entire world be happy."

Sarve Jana sukhino Bhavantu - Let the People of the world be happy

The full version of this prayer is stated as follows:

स्वस्तिप्रजाभ्यः परिपालयंतां न्यायेन मार्गेण महीं महीशाः ।

गोब्राह्मणेभ्यः शुभमस्तु नित्यं लोकाः समस्ताः सुखिनोभवंतु ॥

ॐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः |

This phrase is from one of the Mangala Mantra often recited after a pooja or religious ceremony. Meaning: May the well-being of all people be protected By the powerful and mighty leaders be with law and justice.

May good success be with all divinity and scholars, May all (samastāḥ) the worlds (lokāḥ) become (bhavantu) happy (sukhino).

Oṁ peace, peace, peace.

The origin of the Lokaskema, often called the Mangala Mantra, is obscure. While some yoga practitioners and Hindu scholars erroneously point to the Rig Veda or the invocation of the Katha Upanishad, the only written attribution or textual source of "lokah samastah sukhino bhavantu" seems to be stone inscriptions from the Rulers of the Sangama Dynasty (1336 A.D.-1485 A.D.).[1]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Gopal, Balakrishnan Raja; Ritti, Shrinivas (2004). Inscriptions of the Rulers of the Sangama Dynasty (1336 A.D.-1485 A.D.). Indian Council of Historical Research and Northern Book Centre. ISBN 9788172111687.
  • Balakrishnan Raja Gopal, Shrinivas Ritti. Inscriptions of the Rulers of the Sangama Dynasty (1336 A.D.-1485 A.D.). Indian Council of Historical Research and Northern Book Centre, 2004 - Inscriptions, Kannada, p. 1022.