Lomatia hirsuta

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Lomatia hirsuta
Lomatia hirsuta.jpg
Radal
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
Order: Proteales
Family: Proteaceae
Genus: Lomatia
Species: L. hirsuta
Binomial name
Lomatia hirsuta
Diels ex J.F.Macbr.

Lomatia hirsuta, known as Radal is a tree native to Chile. It grows from Coquimbo to Chiloe (36 to 42°S). It grows on a variety of soils and humidity. It grows on poor soils near ravines.

Description[edit]

It is an evergreen tree that measures up to 15 m (50 ft) tall and 80 cm (31 in) in diameter. Light-grey bark with longitudinal fissures. The leaves are alternate, ovate, heart-shaped base, the petioles are about 2–3 cm long, the leaves are 5-20 long and 4–12 cm wide, toothed edge, dark glossy green above and dull below, the nervation is distinct underneath, The flowers are hermaphrodite, greenish-yellow color, covered in a rusty red, the flowers are arranged in axillary clustered inflorescences . Every flower is formed by four linear tepals, 4 sessile stamens and a shorter style. The fruit is a greyish-black follicle almost woody and oval-oblong shaped 2–4 cm long, made up by two valves. Brown winged seeds arranged in imbricate form about 15 mm wide and 5.6 mm long.

Etymology[edit]

Lomatia; from the Greek lomas ('fringe'), because of the seeds' edge, hirsuta from the Latin 'hairy'; the Spanish name is 'radal', which in turn comes from Mapudungun radal, the Mapuche name of this plant.

Uses[edit]

The wood has beautiful marks, it is similar to Chilean hazel but less elegant. The leaves are used for dyeing wood brown color. It has been planted in Spain[1] and in the British Isles as far north as Scotland.[2]

References[edit]

External links[edit]