London mayoral elections

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The London mayoral election for the office of Mayor of London takes place every four years. The first election was in held May 2000, and four subsequent elections have taken place. The latest mayoral election took place in 2016.

Electoral system[edit]

The electoral system used for London mayor elections is the supplementary vote, where voters express a first and second choice of candidate, if no candidate receives an absolute majority of first choice votes, all but the two leading candidates are eliminated, and the votes of those eliminated redistributed according to their second choice votes to determine the winner.

As with most elected posts in the United Kingdom, a candidate must pay a deposit to run in the election. The current deposit a candidate must pay is £10,000, which is returned if the candidate's wins at least 5% of the first preference votes cast. The winner is elected for a fixed term of four years, there are no restrictions on the number of terms a Mayor may serve. Elections take place in May.

Results[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

2016[edit]

The 2016 London mayoral election was held on 5 May 2016.[1] The results were announced on 7 May at 00:30, despite British television news channel Sky News announcing Sadiq Khan as the winner hours earlier.

Incumbent Mayor Boris Johnson did not run for re election for a third term in office, as he was elected the Member of Parliament for the Conservative Party in Uxbridge and South Ruislip in the 2015 General Election.

Mayor of London election 5 May 2016 [2]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 


Labour Sadiq Khan 1,148,716 44.2% 161,427 1,310,143 56.8%
Conservative Zac Goldsmith 909,755 35.0% 84,859 994,614 43.2%
Green Siân Berry 150,673 5.8%
Liberal Democrat Caroline Pidgeon 120,005 4.6%
UKIP Peter Whittle 94,373 3.6%
Women's Equality Sophie Walker 53,055 2.0%
Respect George Galloway 37,007 1.4%
Britain First Paul Golding 31,372 1.2%
CISTA Lee Harris 20,537 0.8%
BNP David Furness 13,325 0.5%
Independent Prince Zylinski 13,202 0.5%
One Love Ankit Love 4,941 0.2%
Labour gain from Conservative

2012[edit]

Conservative Mayor Boris Johnson was reelected to a second term in office, defeating former Labour mayor Ken Livingstone. Livingstone announced his retirement from politics in his concession speech.

Mayor of London election 3 May 2012 [3]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Conservative Boris Johnson 971,931 44.0% 82,880 1,054,811 51.5%
Labour Ken Livingstone 889,918 40.3% 102,355 992,273 48.5%
Green Jenny Jones 98,913 4.5%
Liberal Democrat Brian Paddick 91,774 4.2%
Independent Siobhan Benita 83,914 3.8%
UKIP Lawrence Webb 43,274 2.0%
BNP Carlos Cortiglia 28,751 1.3%
Conservative hold

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

2008[edit]

The incumbent Labour Mayor, Ken Livingstone was defeated by Conservative candidate Boris Johnson, who became London's second Mayor.

Mayor of London election 1 May 2008 [4]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Conservative Boris Johnson 1,043,761 43.2% 124,977 1,168,738 53.2%
Labour Ken Livingstone 893,887 37.0% 134,089 1,027,976 46.8%
Liberal Democrat Brian Paddick 235,585 9.8%
Green Siân Berry 77,347 3.2%
BNP Richard Barnbrook 69,710 3.2%
Christian Peoples Alan Craig 39,249 1.6%
UKIP Gerard Batten 22,422 1.2%
Respect Lindsey German 16,796 0.7%
English Democrat Matt O'Connor 10,695 0.4%
Independent Winston McKenzie 5,389 0.2%
Conservative gain from Labour

2004[edit]

In June 2004, the second election was held. After being re admitted to the Labour Party, Ken Livingstone was their official candidate. He won re election after second preference votes were counted, with Steve Norris again coming second.

Mayor of London election 10 June 2004 [5]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Labour Ken Livingstone 685,548 36.8% 142,842 828,390 55.4%
Conservative Steven Norris 542,423 29.1% 124,757 667,180 44.6%
Liberal Democrat Simon Hughes 284,647 15.3%
UKIP Frank Maloney 115,666 6.2%
Respect Lindsey German 61,731 3.3%
BNP Julian Leppert 58,407 3.1%
Green Darren Johnson 57,332 3.1%
Christian Peoples Ram Gidoomal 31,698 2.2%
Independent Working Class Lorna Reid 9,452 0.5%
Independent Tammy Nagalingam 6,692 0.4%
Labour gain from Independent

2000[edit]

The 2000 campaign was incident filled. The eventual winner, Ken Livingstone, reneged on an earlier pledge not to run as an independent, after losing the Labour nomination to Frank Dobson. The Conservative Party candidate, Jeffrey Archer, was replaced by Steven Norris after Archer was charged with perjury.

Mayor of London election 4 May 2000 [6]
Party Candidate 1st Round  % Transfers 2nd Round  %  First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Independent Ken Livingstone 667,877 39.0% 108,540 776,417 {{{totalpercent}}}
Conservative Steven Norris 464,434 27.1% 99,703 564,137 {{{totalpercent}}}
Labour Frank Dobson 223,884 13.1%
Liberal Democrat Susan Kramer 203,452 11.9%
Christian Peoples Ram Gidoomal 43,060 2.4%
Green Darren Johnson 38,121 2.2%
BNP Michael Newland 33,569 2.0%
UKIP Damian Hockney 16,324 1.0%
Pro-Motorist Small Shop Geoffrey Ben-Nathan 9,956 0.6%
Independent Ashwin Tanna 9,015 0.5%
Natural Law Geoffrey Clements 5,470 0.3%
Independent win

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About London Elects". londonelects.org.uk. Retrieved 6 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "Official election result declaration, London Elects" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-07-01. 
  3. ^ "London Elects - Declared Results". Greater London Authority. 4 May 2012. Retrieved 17 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "2008 election results for the Mayor of London and the London Assembly". London Elects. 2 May 2008. Retrieved 17 February 2013. 
  5. ^ "2004 election results for the Mayor of London and the London Assembly". London Elects. 10 June 2004. Retrieved 17 February 2013. 
  6. ^ "2000 election results for the Mayor of London and the London Assembly". London Elects. 5 May 2000. Retrieved 17 February 2013. 

External links[edit]