Lonely Teardrops

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"Lonely Teardrops"
Single by Jackie Wilson
B-side In The Blue Of The Evening
Released November 17, 1958
Format 7" single
Recorded 1958
Genre Rock n Roll
Length 2:41
Label Brunswick
Writer(s) Berry Gordy
Roquel Billy Davis
Gwendolyn Gordy
Producer(s) Berry Gordy
Jackie Wilson singles chronology
"To Be Loved"
(1957)
"Lonely Teardrops"
(1958)
"That's Why I Love You So"
(1959)

"Lonely Teardrops" is a song recorded and released as a single in 1958 by R&B, Soul, and Rock n Roll singer Jackie Wilson[1] on the Brunswick label. It is a 1999 Grammy Hall of Fame Inductee. The song is ranked #308 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Song information[edit]

Written by Berry Gordy Jr.,[2] Gwendolyn Gordy (Berry's sister) and Roquel "Billy" Davis, going under the pseudonym Tyran Carlo, the single, alongside Wilson's debuting five consecutive singles between 1957–58, turned Wilson into an R&B superstar and influenced the later careers of Davis, who joined the staff of Chess Records while Gordy used the money from the song's success to form Motown Records within a year. The song raced up to number-one on the Billboard R&B chart and became Wilson's first top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100, eventually peaking at number seven. The hit's success helped land Wilson on American Bandstand and The Ed Sullivan Show performing to receptive audiences on the respective shows, as well as other shows such as Shindig and Hullabaloo.

This was the last song Jackie Wilson performed before his coma and later death, when he collapsed on-stage singing it while appearing as one of the feature acts in Dick Clark's Good Ol' Rock and Roll Revue in 1975.

Cover versions[edit]

The biggest hit cover version was recorded by country music singer Narvel Felts. His version was released in 1976 and reached #5 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart that June. Jay and the Americans covered the song on their 1970 album, Wax Museum, Vol. 1. Brian Hyland also recorded a version of the song that reached #54 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1971. Victor Wood covered this song on the album Mr. Lonely. The Los Angeles hair metal band White Sister recorded a hard rock version of the song on their 1986 album Fashion By Passion. Johnny Maestro & The Brooklyn Bridge recorded the song for their self-titled 1993 double CD and often sang it in concert. In 1975 John Fogerty released a version of it on his solo album John Fogerty. In 2010, Cee Lo Green covered the song on Later... with Jools Holland featuring Holland on piano.[3]

Covers of the song have also appeared in several films: Michael McDonald covered the song in the early 1990s and his version was used in a scene in the film Leaving Las Vegas. It was also covered by Howard Huntsberry for the 1987 biographical movie about Ritchie Valens, La Bamba, and Huey Lewis's performance of the song in the 2000 karaoke-themed film Duets was also released as part of the film's soundtrack. The jazz fusion/rock guitarist Robby Krieger (The Doors) performs an version of the song on his 1989 solo album, No Habla.

Charts[edit]

Chart Date Position
Billboard Hot 100 March 1958 7
R&B March 1958 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Video of the original Jackie Wilson version on Video on YouTube
  2. ^ "Show 17 - The Soul Reformation: More on the evolution of rhythm and blues. [Part 3] : UNT Digital Library". Digital.library.unt.edu. Retrieved 2010-09-18. 
  3. ^ Video on YouTube

External links[edit]