Long Island Jewish Medical Center

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Long Island Jewish Medical Center
Northwell Health
Long Island Jewish Medical Center logo.png
LIJ Zuckerberg pavilion fr eastern lawn jeh.jpg
The Zucker Hillside Hospital at LIJM
Geography
LocationGlen Oaks, New York City, New York, United States
Coordinates40°45′15″N 73°42′32″W / 40.75417°N 73.70889°W / 40.75417; -73.70889Coordinates: 40°45′15″N 73°42′32″W / 40.75417°N 73.70889°W / 40.75417; -73.70889
Organization
TypeTeaching
Affiliated universityDonald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
Services
Beds583
History
Opened1954
Links
Websitewww.northwell.edu
ListsHospitals in New York
Other linksHospitals in Queens

Long Island Jewish Medical Center (LIJMC or LIJ) is a clinical and academic hospital within the Northwell Health system. It is a 583-bed, non-profit tertiary care teaching hospital serving the greater New York metropolitan area. The 48-acre (19 ha) campus is 15 miles (24 km) east of Manhattan, on the border of Queens and Nassau Counties, in Glen Oaks, Queens and Lake Success, New York, respectively.

LIJMC has three components: Long Island Jewish Hospital, Steven & Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, and The Zucker Hillside Hospital. Long Island Jewish Hospital is a 452-bed tertiary adult care hospital with advanced diagnostic and treatment technology, and modern facilities for medical, surgical, dental and obstetrical care. As the primary teaching hospital for the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and the Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, LIJMC's graduate medical education program is one of the largest in New York State, and programs are in divisions headed by full-time faculty.

The Zucker Hillside Hospital, previously known as Hillside Hospital, is an in-patient and out-patient psychiatric hospital and clinic in the borough of Queens in New York City.

LIJ's full-time staff includes more than 500 physicians, who supervise care in all major specialties and participate in the medical center's teaching and research programs.

The medical center is located on the southeast side of North Shore Towers.

The center was founded in 1954 by a group of nine philanthropists, including Jacob H. Horwitz.[1]

Children born at Long Island Jewish Medical Center are typically born at Katz Women's Hospital, on the Queens side of the complex, thus those children are born within New York City, not Nassau County's Lake Success.

Notable people[edit]

Notable births[edit]

Notable deaths[edit]

Notable employees[edit]

Transportation[edit]

The MTA's Q46 bus stops inside the hospital. In addition, the QM5, QM6, QM8, QM35 and QM36 express buses to Manhattan all stop near LIJ.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff writer (October 14, 1992). "Obituary: Jacob H. Horwitz, 100, Innovator In Fashion and Hospital Founder". The New York Times. Retrieved July 5, 2015.
  2. ^ Ross, Andrew; Rose, Tricia (1994). Microphone Friends: Youth Music & Youth Culture. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 163–175. ISBN 0-415-90907-4.
  3. ^ Detman, Gary (June 16, 2016). "Omar Mateen had behavioral issues in school, records show". WPEC. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  4. ^ McFadden, Robert D. (September 15, 1992). "Leon Davis, 85, Head of Health-Care Union, Dies". The New York Times. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
  5. ^ Sack, Kevin (February 12, 1994). "Saul Weprin Is Dead at 66; Sought Assembly Harmony". New York Times. p. 10; Column 1.
  6. ^ Berkow, Ira (November 15, 1998). "Red Holzman, Hall of Fame Coach, Dies at 78". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  7. ^ Mosconi, Angela (June 26, 1999). "Fred Trump, Dad of Donald, Dies at 93". New York Post. Retrieved January 29, 2017.
  8. ^ "Sean". Survivor: Borneo site at CBS.com. Archived from the original on January 3, 2014.
  9. ^ Tagliaferro, Linda (June 16, 1996). "Long Island Q & A: Dr. Harold S. Koplewicz;Helping to Combat Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders". The New York Times.
  10. ^ Otterman, Sharon (December 14, 2020). "'I Trust Science,' Says Nurse Who Is First to Get Vaccine in U.S." The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 15, 2020.

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