Long Jeanne Silver

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Long Jeanne Silver
Born
Tempe, Arizona, United States
Other namesLong Jeanie Silvers, Joan Beattie, Jean Silver, Long Jean Silver, Jean Fulda

Long Jeanne Silver is an American former pornographic actress, known for using the stump of her amputated leg to penetrate her sexual partner in her movies during the 1970s and 1980s.[1]

Silver was born in Tempe, Arizona. She was born with a missing fibula in one leg which required the bottom half of it to be amputated.[2] She ran away from home at age 16 in 1976 to go to New York City, where she would soon begin to pose for adult magazines and perform in porn films.[3]

Prior to pornography, she also had worked as a stripper.[1][4] She was also featured in the self-titled movie, Long Jeanne Silver.[1][5][6] She also was a centerfold for Cheri magazine.[2]

Annie Sprinkle and Silver were once arrested in Rhode Island for producing a magazine that featured a shoot in which Silver penetrated Sprinkle with her stump. The typesetter the magazine hired turned out to be an undercover police officer. The police surveilled them for a month before arresting the group. Multiple obscenity and sodomy-related felony charges were brought against Silver and Sprinkle, all of which were eventually dropped.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 'Jeanne Silver: Real Wild Child', The Rialto Report: Audio interview with Jeanne Silver
  2. ^ a b Friedman, Josh Alan (2012). Tales of Times Square: Expanded Edition. Feral House. p. 24. ISBN 9781936239696. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  3. ^ Zarum, Lara (12 September 2017). "How "The Deuce" Recreated the Naughty, Bawdy, Gaudy World of Old Times Square". The Village Voice. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Long Jeanne Silver". The Cultural Gutter. 2006-04-06. Retrieved 2013-09-05.
  5. ^ Jerry Butler; Robert H. Rimmer; Catherine Tavel (1990). Raw talent: the adult film industry as seen by its most popular male star. Prometheus Books. p. 62. ISBN 9780879756253.
  6. ^ Richard W. Haines (2003). The moviegoing experience, 1968-2001. McFarland. p. 52. ISBN 9780786413614.
  7. ^ Alan Kaufman; Neil Ortenberg; Barney Rosset (2004). The outlaw bible of American literature. Thunder's Mouth Press. p. 555. ISBN 9781560255505.

External links[edit]