Long March 4B

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Long March 4B
CZ-4B.svg
Long March 4B
Function Carrier rocket
Manufacturer CALT
Country of origin  People's Republic of China
Size
Height 45.8 metres (150 ft)[1]
Diameter 3.35 metres (11.0 ft)[1]
Mass 249,200 kilograms (549,400 lb)[1]
Stages 3
Capacity
Payload to LEO 4,200 kilograms (9,300 lb)[2]
Payload to SSO 2,800 kilograms (6,200 lb)[2]
Payload to GTO 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb)[2]
Associated rockets
Family Long March
Derivatives Long March 4C
Launch history
Status Active
Launch sites LA-7 & LA-9, TSLC
LA-4/SLS-2, JSLC
Total launches 28
Successes 27
Failures 1
First flight 10 May 1999
First stage
Length 27.91 m
Diameter 3.35 m
Propellant mass 182,000 kg (401,000 lb)
Engines 4 YF-21C
Thrust 2,961.6 kN (665,800 lbf)
Specific impulse 2,550 m/s (260 s)
Fuel N2O4/UDMH
Second stage
Length 10.9 m
Diameter 3.35 m
Propellant mass 52,700 kg (116,200 lb)
Engines 1 YF-24C
(1 x YF-22C (Main))
(4 x YF-23C (Vernier))
Thrust 742.04 kN (166,820 lbf) (Main)
47.1 kN (10,600 lbf) (Vernier)
Specific impulse 2,942 m/s (300.0 s) (Main)
2,834 m/s (289.0 s) (Vernier)
Fuel N2O4/UDMH
Third stage
Length 14.79 m
Diameter 2.9 m
Propellant mass 14,000 kg (31,000 lb)
Engines 2 YF-40
Thrust 100.85 kN (22,670 lbf)
Specific impulse 2,971 m/s (303.0 s)
Fuel N2O4/UDMH

The Long March 4B (Chinese: 长征四号乙火箭), also known as the Chang Zheng 4B, CZ-4B and LM-4B is a Chinese orbital carrier rocket. Launched from Launch Complex 1 at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, it is a 3-stage rocket, used mostly to place satellites into low Earth and sun synchronous orbits. It was first launched on 10 May 1999, with the FY-1C weather satellite, which would later be used in the 2007 Chinese anti-satellite missile test.

The Chang Zheng 4B experienced its first launch failure on 9 December 2013, with the loss of the CBERS-3 satellite.[3]

List of launches[edit]

Flight number Date (UTC) Launch site Payload Orbit Result
1 May 10, 1999
01:33
LA-7, TSLC Fengyun 1C
Shijian 5
SSO Success
2 October 14, 1999
03:15
LA-7, TSLC CBERS-1
SACI-1
SSO Success
3 September 1, 2000
03:25
LA-7, TSLC Ziyuan II-01 SSO Success
4 May 15, 2002
01:50
LA-7, TSLC Fengyun 1D
Haiyang-1A
SSO Success
5 October 27, 2002
03:17
LA-7, TSLC Ziyuan II-02 SSO Success
6 October 21, 2003
03:16
LA-7, TSLC CBERS-2
Chuangxin-1-01
SSO Success
7 September 8, 2004
23:14
LA-7, TSLC Shijian 6A
Shijian 6B
SSO Success
8 November 6, 2004
03:10
LA-7, TSLC Ziyuan II-03 SSO Success
9 October 23, 2006
23:34
LA-7, TSLC Shijian 6C
Shijian 6D
SSO Success
10 September 19, 2007
03:26
LA-7, TSLC CBERS-2B SSO Success
11 October 25, 2008
01:15
LA-9, TSLC Shijian 6E
Shijian 6F
SSO Success
12 December 15, 2008
03:22
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 5 SSO Success
13 October 6, 2010
00:49
LA-9, TSLC Shijian 6G
Shijian 6H
SSO Success
14 August 15, 2011
22:57
LA-9, TSLC Haiyang-2A SSO Success
15 November 9, 2011
03:21
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 12
Tianxun-1
SSO Success
16 December 22, 2011
03:26
LA-9, TSLC Ziyuan I-02C SSO Success
17 January 9, 2012
03:17
LA-9, TSLC Ziyuan III-01
VesselSat-2
SSO Success
18 May 10, 2012
07:06
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 14
Tiantuo-1
SSO Success
19 October 25, 2013
03:50
LA-4/SLS-2, JSLC Shijian 16 LEO Success
20 December 9, 2013
03:26
LA-9, TSLC CBERS-3 SSO Failure
21 August 19, 2014
03:15
LA-9, TSLC Gaofen 2
BRITE-PL2
SSO Success
22 September 8, 2014
03:22
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 21
Tiantuo-2
SSO Success
23 December 7, 2014
03:26
LA-9, TSLC CBERS-4 SSO Success
24 December 27, 2014
03:22
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 26 SSO Success
25 June 26, 2015
06:22
LA-9, TSLC Gaofen 8 SSO Success
26 November 8, 2015
07:06
LA-9, TSLC Yaogan 28 SSO Success
27 May 30, 2016
03:17
LA-9, TSLC Ziyuan III-02
ÑuSat-1/-2
SSO Success
28 June 29, 2016
03:21
LA-4/SLS-2, JSLC Shijian 16-02 LEO Success

Launch failures[edit]

CBERS-3 launch failure[edit]

On December 9, 2013, a Long March 4B rocket failed while launching the CBERS-3 satellite. During powered flight of the third stage, one of its two engines shut down prematurely and the satellite failed to reach orbit. The cause was traced to foreign debris that blocked the fuel intake of the engine.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Mark Wade. "CZ-4B". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  2. ^ a b c Gunter Krebs. "CZ-4B (Chang Zheng-4B)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2008-04-27. 
  3. ^ Boadle, Anthony. "China-Brazil satellite launch fails, likely fell back to Earth". Reuters. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  4. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (3 March 2014). "China Great Wall Pins December Long March Launch Failure on Fuel-line Clog". SpaceNews. Retrieved 10 August 2015.