Long Walk Home

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"Long Walk Home"
Song by Bruce Springsteen
from the album Magic
Released United States September 25, 2007 (vinyl record)
October 2, 2007 (CD)
United Kingdom October 1, 2007
Australia October 8, 2007
Thailand October 11, 2007[1]
Recorded March - April/May 2007
Southern Tracks Recording Studio, Atlanta, Georgia
Genre Rock, alternative rock, heartland rock
Length 4:35
Label Columbia Records
Songwriter(s) Bruce Springsteen
Producer(s) Brendan O'Brien

"Long Walk Home" is a 2006 song written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. It first appeared on his Sessions Band Tour of that year, in folk guise in the European leg of the tour in London for one performance only. Reworked with different and shorter lyrics, it was recorded by Springsteen and the E Street Band as a mid-tempo rocker and released on the 2007 Springsteen album Magic. This song was #8 on Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Best Songs of 2007.[2]

Springsteen had said that it was a song about how he felt in the times of George W. Bush. "In that particular song a guy comes back to his town and recognizes nothing and is recognized by nothing," Springsteen told The New York Times' A. O. Scott. "The singer in 'Long Walk Home,' that's his experience. His world has changed. The things that he thought he knew, the people who he thought he knew, whose ideals he had something in common with, are like strangers. The world that he knew feels totally alien. I think that's what's happened in this country in the past six years." [3]

Although not released as a single, the song was highlighted when a music video was made and released on 25 September 2007, the same day as the video for Magic first single "Radio Nowhere". The video featured real-life scenes from Springsteen's Jersey Shore interspersed with shots of Springsteen at Asbury Park Convention Hall and at Tony's diner on Main Street in Freehold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bruce Springsteen - Magic" (in Thai). Sony Music. Retrieved 2007-11-03. 
  2. ^ No byline (December 11, 2007). "The 100 Best Songs of 2007" Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2007-12-21
  3. ^ Scott, A. O. (30 September 2007). "In Love With Pop, Uneasy With the World". New York Times. New York. Retrieved 8 May 2007. 

External links[edit]