Lonnie Shelton

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Lonnie Shellton
Personal information
Born (1955-10-19) October 19, 1955 (age 59)
Bakersfield, California
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight 240 lb (109 kg)
Career information
High school Foothill (Bakersfield, California)
College Oregon State (1973–1976)
NBA draft 1976 / Round: 2 / Pick: 25th overall
Selected by the New York Knicks
Pro career 1976–1986
Position Power forward / Center
Number 8
Career history
19761978 New York Knicks
19781983 Seattle SuperSonics
19831986 Cleveland Cavaliers
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points 8,049 (12.0 ppg)
Rebounds 4,136 (6.1 rpg)
Assists 1,459 (2.2 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Lonnie Jewel Shelton (born October 19, 1955) is a retired American National Basketball Association player who played in 1976–1985. He played college basketball for Oregon State University. Shelton was drafted by the Memphis Sounds (soon to become the Baltimore Claws) of the American Basketball Association in 1975 but elected to stay in college. He was then selected by the New York Knicks in the second round of the 1976 NBA Draft.

Professional career[edit]

Shelton stayed with the Knicks for 2 seasons, later playing 5 seasons with the Seattle SuperSonics and finishing his career playing for the Cleveland Cavaliers for 3 seasons. Shelton led the NBA in personal fouls in his first two seasons with New York. In 1979, his first season with the SuperSonics, Shelton was the team's starting power forward and helped the SuperSonics win the NBA Finals. Shelton was one of three SuperSonics represented in the 1982 NBA All-Star Game (along with Jack Sikma and Gus Williams) and was named to the NBA's 1982 2nd All-Defense Team.

Personal[edit]

Shelton's sons include L. J.,[1][2][3] who played offensive tackle in the NFL, Tim Shelton, who plays for the San Diego State Aztecs basketball team, Titus Shelton, who played for the Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Mustangs basketball team from 2005–2009, and Marlon, who played for the Washington Huskies from 1998 to 2003.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b SONICS: Lonnie Shelton: Unfair Compensation. National Basketball Association
  2. ^ SONICS: Sonics History Top Ten: Sonics Sons. National Basketball Association
  3. ^ Dan Raley (February 12, 2003) "Body art covers eight Huskies". Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

External links[edit]