Baron Eure

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Baron Eure was a title in the Peerage of England. It was granted to Sir William Eure by Henry VIII in 1544. The Baron was thereafter called Lord Eure. The title became extinct with the death of Ralph Eure in 1690. The family name is also spelt Evres, Ewer,[1] and Evers.[2][3]

Sir William Eure was created Lord Eure, by letters patent, on 24 February 1544 during the reign of Henry VIII.[4][5] He was succeeded by his grandson, William, 2nd Lord Eure (son of Ralph, heir of the 1st Baron, who was killed at the battle of Ancrum Moor), who died 1570 during the reign of Elizabeth I,[6][7] leaving his son, Ralph, 3rd Lord Eure, father of William, 4th Lord Eure, who was succeeded by his grandson, William, 5th Lord Eure (son of Ralph), who was succeeded by his uncle, William, 6th Lord Eure, slain at the battle of Marston-Moor, 1645, leaving only daughters. The honour then devolved on George, great grandson of the 2nd Peer (viz. son of Horace, son of Sir Francis, second son of the said Peer.) This George thus becoming 7th Lord Eure, died unmarried 1672. He was succeeded by his brother, Ralph, 8th Lord Eure; on whose death without issue, the honour became extinct.[8]

Arthur Collins in 1812 briefly described the baronage with eight barons,[8] as did John Preston Neale in 1823 and John Burke in 1831,[9][10] however The Gentleman's Magazine, for August 1817, includes two not three Williams between Ralph Eure and George Eure which makes George the 6th Baron Eure not the 7th as in Collins,[11] and some other sources also state that George and Ralf (the last Baron Eure), were the 6th and 7th barons.[12][13]

Lord Eure[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Noble, p. 381 NB, Ewer comes via the relationship Noble claims exists between this house and Isaac Ewer
  2. ^ Bindoff. p. 109
  3. ^ "It has been variously spelt, for besides Eure, we find Evre, Ever, Evere, Evers, Evars, Ivers, Ewer, Ewre, Ewry, Eury, Eurye, Ewrye, and, in the Roll of Arms temp. Edw. II., Oevre (which may be a transcriber's error); but the general pronunciation of it is believed to have been Eure; so at least it has been pronounced by the descendants of the family as far back as memory extends." (Walford p. 221).
  4. ^ Burk p. 190
  5. ^ Collins, p. 419, "35 Henry VIII" (not the same year as Burk)
  6. ^ Colins, p. 419, "36 Elizabeth"
  7. ^ Burk p. 109 "29th Elisabeth"
  8. ^ a b Collins, p. 419
  9. ^ Neale p.
  10. ^ Burke, pp. 190,191
  11. ^ The Gentleman's Magazine For August 1817 pp. 99,100 cites Hart. MSS. Brit. Mus. 5808:
  12. ^ Firth, p. 250
  13. ^ "Index of persons and Places: E", Calendar of Treasury Books, Volume 16: 1700-1701 (1938), pp. 481-483. Date accessed: 6 August 2009.
  14. ^ birth date from an unreliable source
  15. ^ R. W. Hoyle. the pilgrimage of grace and the politics of the 1530s p. 421
  16. ^ a b Person Page - 12536, thePeerage.com cites "G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume V, page 181. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage."
  17. ^ Person Page - 1298, thePeerage.com, cites "Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 685. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition." and G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume V, page 181. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage."
  18. ^ Colins, p. 419, died at the Battle of Marston Moor
  19. ^ a b Noble, p. 381. dod

References[edit]

  • Stanley Thomas Bindoff. The House of Commons, 1509-1558, Boydell & Brewer, 1982, ISBN 0-436-04282-7, ISBN 978-0-436-04282-9
  • John Burke A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England, Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley, 1831
  • Arthur Collins, Collins's peerage of England, Genealogical, Biographical, and Historical, greatly augmented and continued to the present time., Printed for F. C. and J. Rivington, 1812
  • Charles Harding Firth, The House of Lords during the Civil War,Taylor & Francis, 1974 ISBN 0-416-80960-X, 9780416809602.
  • John Preston Neale. Views of the seats of noblemen and gentlemen, in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, Volume II, Sherwood, Jones and Co., 1823
  • Mark Noble, G. G. J. and J. Robinson (Paternoster-Row, London, England) Memoirs of the protectoral-house of Cromwell;: deduced from an early period, and continued down to the present time ... collected chiefly from original papers and records ... together with an appendix ... Embellished with elegant engravings, Volume I, printed for G. G. J. and J. Robinson, 1787.
  • W. S. Walford "Notice of the Roll of Arms belonging to Wilkinson Mathews esq. Q.C.", British Archaeological Association. Volume 17, Central Committee, Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Central Committee, Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Council, Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, Royal Archaeological Institute (Great Britain), Longman, Rrown,(sic) Green, and Longman, 1860, pp. 218–223
Attribution

This article incorporates text from a work in the public domain: "Collins's peerage of England",Arthur Collins (1812)