Vancouver School Board

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Vancouver School Board
Location
1580 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia
British Columbia
Canada
District information
SuperintendentHelen McGregor
Schools119
Budget$735 million
Students and staff
Students48,600
Teachers~4,000
Other information
Websitewww.vsb.bc.ca

The Vancouver School Board (VSB), officially the Board of Education of School District No. 39 (Vancouver), is a school district based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A board of nine elected trustees governs this school district that serves the city of Vancouver and the University Endowment Lands.

Board of education[edit]

Vancouver Board of Education
Type
Type
Leadership
Chair
Victoria Jung, ABC Vancouver
since November 2022
Vice Chair
Preeti Faridkot, ABC Vancouver
since November 2022
Structure
Seats9 trustees
1 non-voting student trustee
Political groups
  •   Green (2)
      COPE (1)
      Independent (1)
      OneCity (1)
Elections
Plurality at-large voting
Last election
October 15, 2022
Next election
October 17, 2026
Meeting place
1580 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia
Website
www.vsb.bc.ca/District/Board-of-Education/Pages/default.aspx
Constitution
School Act

The Vancouver Board of Education is composed of nine elected trustees and a student trustee.[1] Trustees of the Vancouver School Board are elected under an at-large system.

Since 2022[edit]

As of November 2022, the trustees of the Vancouver School Board, listed by number of votes received during the 2022 Vancouver municipal election, are:

Name Party
Victoria Jung ABC Vancouver
Alfred Chien ABC Vancouver
Josh Zhang ABC Vancouver
Christopher JK Richardson Independent[a]
Preeti Faridkot ABC Vancouver
Jennifer Reddy OneCity
Suzie Mah COPE
Lois Chan-Pedley Green
Janet Fraser Green

2018–2022[edit]

As of November 2018, the trustees of the Vancouver School Board, listed by number of votes received during the 2018 Vancouver municipal election, are:

Name Party
Janet Fraser Green
Estrellita Gonzalez Green
Jennifer Reddy OneCity
Oliver Hanson Independent[b]
Fraser Ballantyne Independent[b]
Carmen Cho Independent[b]
Lois Chan-Pedley Green
Barb Parrott COPE
Allan Wong Vision

2017–2018[edit]

All positions on the school board were vacated on October 17, 2016, when the elected board was removed by provincial Education Minister Mike Bernier for failing to pass a balanced budget.[4] A by-election was held on October 14, 2017, for all trustee seats. The trustees elected during that by-election, listed by number of votes received, were:

Name Party
Janet Fraser Green
Judy Zaichkowsky Green
Estrellita Gonzalez Green
Joy Alexander Vision
Allan Wong Vision
Lisa Dominato NPA
Fraser Ballantyne NPA
Carrie Bercic OneCity
Ken Clement Vision

2014–2016[edit]

The trustees elected during the 2014 Vancouver municipal election served until they were removed by Education Minister Mike Bernier on October 17, 2016, for failing to pass a balanced budget.[4] Listed by number of votes received, they were:

Name Party
Patti Bacchus Vision
Joy Alexander Vision
Fraser Ballantyne NPA
Allan Wong Vision
Mike Lombardi Vision
Penny Noble NPA
Janet Fraser Green
Stacy Robertson NPA
Christopher Richardson NPA

Demographics[edit]

The Vancouver school district is a large, urban and multicultural school district. As of 2019, the district provides programs to 54,000 students in kindergarten to grade 12, as well as over 2,000 adults in adult education programs.[5]

In 2014, there were 1,473 international students in Vancouver public schools.[6]

Seismic upgrading[edit]

The Ministry of Education launched a seismic upgrading program in March 2005 to upgrade schools all over British Columbia. The program is quoted to cost a total of $1.5 billion. The following schools in the Vancouver School Board are supported to proceed with seismic mitigation in 2015: Killarney Secondary, David Thompson Secondary, Maple Grove Elementary, Lord Tennyson Elementary, Dr. Annie B. Jamieson Elementary, Eric Hamber Secondary, Point Grey Secondary, Renfrew Community Elementary, Sir Alexander Mackenzie Elementary, Waverley Elementary, Edith Cavell Elementary, Prince of Wales Secondary, Templeton Secondary, General Wolf Elementary, David Lloyd George Elementary, and Bayview Community Elementary.[7]

Elementary schools[edit]

  • Admiral Seymour
  • Bayview
  • Britannia Elementary
  • Captain James Cook Elementary
  • Carnarvon
  • Champlain Heights
  • Charles Dickens
  • Chief Maquinna
  • David Livingstone
  • David Lloyd George
  • David Oppenheimer
  • Dr. A.R. Lord
  • Dr. Annie B. Jamieson
  • Dr. George M. Weir
  • Dr. H.N. MacCorkindale
  • Dr. R.E. McKechnie
  • Edith Cavell
  • Elsie Roy
  • Emily Carr
  • False Creek
  • Florence Nightingale
  • General Brock
  • General Gordon Elementary School
  • General Wolfe
  • George T. Cunningham
  • Graham D Bruce
  • Grandview ʔuuqinak’uuh
  • Grenfell
  • Hastings
  • Henry Hudson
  • J.W. Sexsmith
  • John Henderson
  • John Norquay
  • Jules Quesnel
  • Kerrisdale Elementary School
  • L'Ecole Bilingue
  • Laura Secord
  • Lord Beaconsfield
  • Lord Kitchener
  • Lord Nelson
  • Lord Roberts
  • Lord Selkirk
  • Lord Strathcona
  • Lord Tennyson
  • Maple Grove
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Nootka
  • Norma Rose Point School
  • Pierre Elliott Trudeau Elementary School
  • Queen Alexandra
  • Queen Elizabeth
  • Queen Mary
  • Queen Victoria Annex
  • Quilchena
  • Renfrew
  • Shaughnessy
  • Simon Fraser
  • Sir Alexander Mackenzie
  • Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith
  • Sir Guy Carleton
  • Sir James Douglas
  • Sir John Franklin Elementary School
  • wek̓ʷan̓əs tə syaqʷəm (formerly named Sir Matthew Begbie)
  • Sir Richard McBride
  • Sir Sandford Fleming Elementary School
  • Sir Wilfred Grenfell
  • Sir Wilfrid Laurier
  • Sir William Osler
  • Sir William Van Horne
  • Southlands
  • šxʷwəq̓ʷəθət Crosstown Elementary
  • Tecumseh
  • Thunderbird šxʷəxʷaʔəs
  • Trafalgar
  • Tyee
  • University Hill Elementary
  • Vancouver Learning Network Elementary
  • Walter Moberly
  • Waverley
  • χpey̓ Elementary (formerly named Sir William MacDonald from 1906–2017)

David Lloyd George Elementary School[edit]

David Lloyd George Elementary School is an elementary school in the Marpole neighbourhood.[8] It holds approximately 427 students in grades K through 7.[9] The school opened in 1921 and was named after David Lloyd George, the British prime minister from 1916 to 1922. The sports teams are called the DLG Hornets and wear purple.

David Oppenheimer Elementary School[edit]

David Oppenheimer Elementary School opened in 1959 and was named after one of the early mayors of the city, David Oppenheimer.[10] It is located at 2421 Scarboro Avenue, in the Victoria-Fraserview neighbourhood. As of 2016, the school principal is Rosie Finch; the school's sports teams are called the Orcas.[11]

General Gordon Elementary School[edit]

General Gordon Elementary School is an elementary school that opened in 1912. It was named for British general Charles George Gordon, who was killed at Khartoum in January 1885. It is located at 2268 Bayswater Street. In September 2008, it was selected as one of three schools in a pilot provincially supported "Neighbourhoods of Learning" program.[12]

Lord Tennyson Elementary School[edit]

Lord Tennyson Elementary School is a French immersion school opened in 1912, named after 19th-century British poet Alfred Tennyson, The 1st Baron Tennyson. It is located at 1936 West 10th Avenue. As of 2022, the school principal is Bruce Salle. Lord Tennyson is a feeder school for Kitsilano Secondary School, where graduates can continue their education in French Immersion.

Nootka Elementary School[edit]

Nootka Elementary School opened in 1959 as Lord Beaconsfield Annex, but a growing student population led to school status being granted in 1963.[13][14] It is located at 3375 Nootka Street. As of 2016, the current school principal is Monika Sanft and the vice-principal is Megan Davies.[15]

Queen Alexandra Elementary School[edit]

Queen Alexandra Elementary School opened in 1909 and was named for Alexandra of Denmark. It is located at 1300 East Broadway, at the intersection with Clark Drive.[16] It is near Vancouver Community College's Broadway campus, and is easily accessible from VCC–Clark station and Commercial–Broadway station on the SkyTrain. As of 2018, the school principal is John MacCormack.

Queen Mary Elementary School[edit]

Queen Mary Elementary School opened in 1915. It is located at 2000 Trimble Street at 4th Avenue in the West Point Grey neighbourhood. As of 2020, the school principal is Megan Davies.[17] The school has a population of about 450 students from grade K-7. Queen Mary Elementary School is on a hill close to Locarno Beach. It has two buildings, a gravel field and two playgrounds. The main red building was a former town hall for the city of Vancouver. It is named for Queen Mary, the wife of George V.

Shaughnessy Elementary School[edit]

Shaughnessy Elementary School

Shaughnessy Elementary School opened in 1920 as Prince of Wales Elementary and Secondary School. In 1960, the current Prince of Wales Secondary School was opened nearby, and the school was renamed after the surrounding Shaughnessy neighbourhood. The school is located at 4250 Marguerite Street, near King Edward Avenue and Granville Street.

χpey̓ Elementary School[edit]

χpey̓ Elementary opened in 1906 as Sir William Macdonald Elementary School in honour of the Canadian tobacco manufacturer and major education philanthropist. Macdonald was unofficially rechristened "χpey̓" on October 24, 2017, following a 2-year VSB initiative to rename the school to better reflect "the Indigenous heritage and education history of the area" as well as "the District Aboriginal Focus School program".[18][19] The name, which means "cedar" in the henqeminem dialect of the Musqueam nation, was nominated by Chief Wayne Sparrow and Musqueam council members.[19] The change became official following a Musqueam renaming ceremony on June 1, 2018.[20] Because of its low enrolment and high seismic risk, χpey̓ was shortlisted for closure in 2015, but Vancouver City Council elected to keep it open until at least 2020.[21] χpey̓ is located at 1959 East Hastings Street in East Vancouver's Grandview-Woodland area, but since becoming a First Nations focus school in 2012, its catchment area has switched from local to district.[20]

List of elementary annexes[edit]

  • Champlain Heights Annex
  • Charles Dickens Annex
  • Collingwood Neighbourhood (Bruce Annex)
  • Garibaldi Annex (Nelson Annex)
  • Henderson Annex (not enrolling since September 2016.)
  • Kerrisdale Annex
  • Maquinna Annex (not enrolling since September 2015.)
  • McBride Annex
  • Queen Elizabeth Annex (Jules Quesnel Annex)
  • Queen Victoria (Secord Annex)
  • Roberts Annex
  • Selkirk Annex
  • Sir James Douglas Annex
  • Sir Wilfrid Laurier Annex (not enrolling since September 2016.)
  • Tecumseh Annex
  • Tillicum Annex (Hastings Annex)

Secondary schools[edit]

The VSB operates 18 secondary schools within Vancouver and the University Endowment Lands. Secondary schools in the district begin at Grade 8 and continue to Grade 12, where students graduate with their Dogwood Diploma.

List of secondary schools
School Name Capacity Enrolment (2007)[22] Notes
Britannia 1025 572
David Thompson 1550 1410
Eric Hamber 1700 1589
Gladstone 1600 965
John Oliver 1700 1106
Killarney 2200 1895
King George 375 485
Kitsilano 1500 1371
Lord Byng 1200 1284
Magee 1200 1089
Point Grey stəywəte:n̓ 1050 975
Prince of Wales 1100 1043
Sir Charles Tupper 1500 1013
Sir Winston Churchill 1850 2000
Templeton 1400 801
University Hill 950 757
Vancouver Learning Network – Secondary VLN is an online school
Vancouver Technical 1700 1641
Windermere 1500 1009

Alternative program education sites[edit]

  • 8J/9J Program
  • Aries Program
  • Byng Satellite Program (closed 2010)
  • Cedar Walk Program
  • East Side Program
  • Epic Program
  • Foundations program
  • Genesis Broadway
  • Genesis North East
  • Genesis South
  • Hamber House Adolescent Day Treatment program
  • Outreach Program
  • Pinnacle Program
  • Streetfront Program
  • Sunrise East Program
  • Take A Hike Program
  • The West Program
  • Total Education Program
  • Tupper Young Parents Alternative Program
  • Vinery Program
  • Waverley Annex Learning Hub – Spectrum
  • West Coast Alternative Program

[23]

Special programs[edit]

Mini-schools[edit]

Mini-schools are enriched programs for highly motivated students. Mini-schools begin at grade 8, with approximately 500 total spots available. Each year over 1400 students apply for mini-schools, with admission based on district assessment results, grade 6 and 7 report cards, applications, and interviews.[25]

Mini-schools in the district include:[26]

  • Britannia Hockey Academy
  • Britannia Venture Program
  • Byng Arts Mini School
  • David Thompson Odyssey Program
  • Gladstone Mini School
  • Hamber Challenge Studio Program
  • Ideal Mini School
  • John Oliver Digital Immersion Mini School
  • Killarney Mini School
  • King George Mini School
  • Magee SPARTS
  • Point Grey Mini School
  • Prince of Wales Mini School
  • Synergy at Churchill
  • Templeton Mini School
  • Tupper Mini School
  • Vancouver Technical Flex Humanities Program
  • Vancouver Technical Summit Program
  • Windermere Leadership

Transgender policy[edit]

In June 2014, the Vancouver School Board adopted a new policy regarding transgender children. It intends to support transgender and LGBTQ in allowing them be called by the name they identify with. They will also be able to use whichever washroom they feel most comfortable in.[27]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Richardson was ejected from ABC Vancouver after the ballot deadline. The party has said he will not sit in their caucus.[2]
  2. ^ a b c Elected as part of the Non-Partisan Association but left the party to sit as an independent on April 23, 2021.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Board of Education". VSB website. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  2. ^ "ABC Vancouver drops school board candidate over involvement in failed charity". vancouversun. Retrieved February 12, 2023.
  3. ^ Crawford, Tiffany. "Three Vancouver school trustees resign membership with NPA to sit as independents". Canada.com. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  4. ^ a b Shaw, Rob; Sherlock, Tracy (October 17, 2016). "B.C. education minister Bernier fires Vancouver school board". Vancouver Sun. Archived from the original on October 19, 2016.
  5. ^ "Our District". vsb.bc.ca. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  6. ^ Sherlock, Tracy. "B.C. school shutdown has China 'concerned'." Vancouver Sun. September 12, 2014. Retrieved on December 25, 2014.
  7. ^ "School District Profile" (PDF).
  8. ^ "For School Data, Source: BC Schools Book Archived 12 July 2006 at the Wayback Machine." Province of British Columbia, Ministry of Education January 16, 2006.
  9. ^ "Ready Reference March 2008" (PDF). vsb.bc.ca.
  10. ^ "School Overview - School Profile". www.vsb.bc.ca. Archived from the original on March 11, 2007.
  11. ^ "Home". oppenheimer.vsb.bc.ca.
  12. ^ "Provincial government chose to upgrade school in premier's riding". Archived from the original on September 16, 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2008.
  13. ^ "School overview". vsb.bc.ca.
  14. ^ Teen swarmings [dead link] CTV.ca, (July 15, 2005)
  15. ^ "Home". nootka.vsb.bc.ca.
  16. ^ "Home". go.vsb.bc.ca.
  17. ^ "Queen Mary Elementary School". www.vsb.bc.ca.
  18. ^ Kurucz, John (October 24, 2017). "Macdonald elementary renamed χpey̓". Vancouver Courier. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  19. ^ a b CBC News (October 24, 2017). "Sir William Macdonald Elementary renamed χpey̓ Elementary". CBC News. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  20. ^ a b Kurucz, John (June 1, 2018). "χpey̓ Elementary becomes official with Indigenous naming ceremony". Vancouver Courier. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  21. ^ Sherlock, Tracy (October 27, 2015). "Vancouver school to stay open, get new name". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  22. ^ Long Range Facilities Plan 2019: Appendix G (PDF) (Report). May 29, 2019. p. 1. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  23. ^ "Schools – Vancouver School Board". www.vsb.bc.ca.
  24. ^ "Aboriginal Education". Vancouver School Board. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
  25. ^ "Mini School Application Process". vsb.bc.ca. Vancouver School Board. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  26. ^ "VSB Grade 8 Programs Brochure" (PDF). vsb.bc.ca. Vancouver School Board. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  27. ^ "Transgender Policy Adopted by Vancouver School Board". Retrieved January 29, 2015.

External links[edit]